Facebook Pixel English Faculty and Staff | Western Kentucky University Skip to main content
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    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Fabian
    [Last_Name] => Alvarez
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    [Email] => fabian.alvarez@wku.edu
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    [Title] => Instructor II
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 7c
    [Phone] => 270-745-2562
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Freshman Composition; Introduction to Literature; Writing in the Disciplines; Writing in the Disciplines (online course through Independent Learning)</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>I grew up on small cotton farm in rural West Texas.&nbsp; After high school, I set off to become a high school English teacher, earning my Bachelor&rsquo;s of English from Angelo State University.&nbsp; Life would take me to northern California, where I earned my Master&rsquo;s Degree in Rhetoric and Composition from CSU, Chico. &nbsp;In 2004, I made a new home in Bowling Green and have been teaching general education courses at WKU since Spring 2007.</p>
<p>Throughout my teaching career, I&rsquo;ve been focused upon understanding the role of language in the creation and transformation of realities.&nbsp; I find it my duty to help students participate in these investigations, believing that rhetorical analysis will be the most helpful skill they acquire.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p>I understand that students are not enthusiastic about taking general education courses, especially English, and for this reason, I try to make my courses relevant to students&rsquo; lives within the university and outside in the "real world."</p>
<p>In order to bring out the best in my students, I challenge them to exceed their self-expectations and attain a high level of excellence (while still enjoying the experience).<span style="font-size: small;"> It&rsquo;s not </span>my job to give good grades.&nbsp; My job is to help create well-informed, literate citizens who can have success within academia and out in the &ldquo;real world.&rdquo;</p>
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    [MemberID] => 1532
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => David
    [Last_Name] => Bell
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => david.j.bell@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 107
    [Phone] => 270-745-4406
    [Website] => http://www.davidbellnovels.com
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; Writing in the Disciplines; Creative Writing; Intermediate Fiction Writing; Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop; Creative Writing Capstone<br /><br /></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Creative writing, composition</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span style="font-size: small;"><span>David Bell's most recent novel is SOMEBODY'S DAUGHTER (Berkley/Penguin 2018). He is also the author of&nbsp;</span><span>BRING HER HOME (2017), SINCE SHE WENT AWAY (2016), SOMEBODY I USED TO KNOW (2015), THE</span><span>&nbsp;FORGOTTEN GIRL (2014), NEVER COME BACK (2013), THE HIDING PLACE (2012), CEMETERY GIRL (2011), THE GIRL IN THE WOODS (2009), and THE CONDEMNED (2008.) With Molly McCaffrey, he co-edited the short fiction anthologies STUCK IN THE MIDDLE and&nbsp; COMMUTABILITY: STORIES ABOUT THE JOURNEY FROM HERE TO THERE, which were both published by Main Street Rag Publishing. His novella, "Rides A Stranger," was published by Mysterious Press in 2013, and his short fiction has appeared in Cemetery Dance, Western Humanities Review, Backwards City Review and other journals. In 2013, CEMETERY GIRL was awarded the prestigious Le Prix Polar International de Cognac for the best crime novel of the year. His work has been translated into more than a dozen foreign languages.&nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> David received a B.A. in English from Indiana University, an M.A. in creative writing from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and a Ph.D in American literature and creative writing from the University of Cincinnati. He can be reached through his website: <a href="https://email.wku.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=HPlSoa5WY0Kd5ufp9ftHZD7b5j2djtEI8wY36DZ4t8adlyBm4UXeZRYTACTovuv9MzNLPXSPeO0.&amp;URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.davidbellnovels.com" target="_blank"> http://www.davidbellnovels.com</a>, through Twitter: <a href="https://email.wku.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=HPlSoa5WY0Kd5ufp9ftHZD7b5j2djtEI8wY36DZ4t8adlyBm4UXeZRYTACTovuv9MzNLPXSPeO0.&amp;URL=http%3a%2f%2ftwitter.com%2fDavidBellNovels" target="_blank"> http://twitter.com/DavidBellNovels</a>, and through Facebook: <a href="https://email.wku.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=HPlSoa5WY0Kd5ufp9ftHZD7b5j2djtEI8wY36DZ4t8adlyBm4UXeZRYTACTovuv9MzNLPXSPeO0.&amp;URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.facebook.com%2fDavidBellNovels" target="_blank"> http://www.facebook.com/DavidBellNovels</a><br /> </span></p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:05:25
    [Edited_By] => caroline.mason448
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-02-12 09:04:15
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    [MemberID] => 1534
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Wes
    [Last_Name] => Berry
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => wes.berry@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor and Graduate Advisor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 110b
    [Phone] => 270-745-5770
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; American Studies: Land, Nature, Wilderness; Survey of American Literature II; Contemporary Literature; Kentucky Literature; Southern Literature; Studies in Genre: Environmental Literature and Ecocriticism; Seminar in American Writers: Regionalism vs. Cosmopolitanism in Modern American Literature &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p>&nbsp;environmental literature / social justice / eco-literacy, Southern studies, regional foodways</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Wes Berry, aka The Hungry Professor, prefers first-person self-reportage, thus--</p>
<p>I&rsquo;m a Kentuckian teaching English to mostly Kentuckians. Before returning to my home region of southcentral KY in 2005, I got the PhD in American literature from the University of Mississippi, specializing in Southern writing and environmental humanities. I also got fiction writing mentoring from Darcey Steinke, Larry Brown, and Barry Hannah, whose novels and stories I now assign in the Southern Literature course I&rsquo;m fortunate to teach regularly. Other courses include Kentucky Literature (a wonderful opportunity to read and share our rich literary-cultural heritage), Survey of American Literature 1865-present, and Introduction to Graduate Studies. I&rsquo;m the Director of Graduate Studies for the English Department.</p>
<p>In addition to the mortgage-paying stuff of teaching and advising, I&rsquo;ve a few hobbies that connect with my primary field of scholarly expertise--American literature with the foci in Southern culture/literature and environmental studies. For instance, Kentucky writer Wendell Berry is one of my heroes and a big influence in my life. I assign his sage essays and good honest poems in various courses, and at home I cultivate with my wife Elisa a little homestead where we grow a goodly portion of our food in an effort to eat well and cut down that long transportation needed to ship veggies from the central valley of California. We also want to eat animal protein from critters that have lived good lives, and our sheep, rabbits, chickens, goats, and pigs (when we had them) live under the sun on grass with room to move around and burrow and do what animals normally do when given the freedom to do it. The gardening, fencing, feeding and butchering keep us plenty busy.</p>
<p>We also cook a lot, and I spend many waking and slumbering hours thinking and dreaming about food&mdash;about cultivation, harvest, preserving and cooking. We&rsquo;ve ventured into the art of fermentation with kraut, kimchee, and wine making; put up pickled okra, dilly beans, cukes, eggs, hot peppers, onions in malt vinegar, and fermented pepper pastes; dabbled in country ham making and charcuterie after raising and butchering pigs. Made haggis, with lamb sausages on the horizon.</p>
<p>So I study the literature of sustainability/ecology and then try to have a good measure of praxis. My favorite theoretical approaches to literature are those that connect well with the world--ecocriticism in its various forms, Marxist and feminist studies, and so forth. I assign a lot of environmental texts in my courses and attempt in a small way to practice &ldquo;right livelihood,&rdquo; as Wendell Berry puts it&mdash;a conscious daily living not terribly disconnected from the ideas presented in the books I study. But I also want to avoid dogma and the all-or-nothing mentality, which is why we choose raising and butchering animals to vegetarianism.</p>
<p>I&rsquo;m not striving for environmental sainthood, and thank goodness because then I couldn&rsquo;t have written <em>The Kentucky Barbecue Book </em>(2013), the first comprehensive exploration of Kentucky&rsquo;s distinct barbecue traditions and regional variations. I&rsquo;ve eaten at nearly 200 barbecue places in Kentucky, some of them multiple times, and you can&rsquo;t perform such gluttony and achieve environmental sainthood. I&rsquo;m mostly comfortable living with the contradictions. Cholesterol meds help as well.</p>
<p>Current and future projects include a series of interviews with Kentucky&rsquo;s environmental writers and probably some novel scribbling. And I&rsquo;d like to do more work in TV show production&mdash;like food/travel shows&mdash;as I was fortunate to do for a year recently.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Twitter: hungryprofessor</p>
<p>TV: Youtube.com/wbkogolocal</p>
<p>Facebook: Wes Berry&rsquo;s Kentucky Barbecue Adventures</p>
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:08:28
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    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Tim
    [Last_Name] => Brotherton
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    [Email] => tim.brotherton@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 3f
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
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    [Section_Value3] => <p>Professor Tim Brotherton served for twenty-fours years as a U.S. Army Infantry officer, including three tours in Asia. He taught at West Point and The University of Guam before WKU. Although he teaches full-time now, he has worked at different levels in four&nbsp;separate colleges at WKU. He and his wife, Susan, have two grown children and three grandchildren.</p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-11 08:25:46
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-08 07:46:20
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    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Bailey
    [Last_Name] => Cooke
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    [Email] => bailey.cooke610@topper.wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Student Office Assistant
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 135
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Unique_Department] => 0
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    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2017-09-25 15:24:29
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:09:43
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(
    [MemberID] => 1535
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Lloyd
    [Last_Name] => Davies
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => lloyd.davies@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 118
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="font-size: small;">Introduction to Literature</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Writing in the Disciplines</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Survey of English Literature I &amp; II;</span><span style="font-size: small;"> World Literature</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Topics in English: Switzerland in Literature</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Literary Criticism</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Romantic Movement</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Seminar in British Writers</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Special Topics</span><span style="font-size: small;">; Faculty-directed Summer Study Abroad Program in Switzerland</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span style="font-size: small;">Romanticism<br /></span><span style="font-size: small;">Literary Criticism<br /></span><span style="font-size: small;">Aesthetic Theory<br /></span><span style="font-size: small;">Jewish/Biblical Studies</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span style="font-size: small;">Ph.D. in Literature, 1993. Duke University, Program in Literature, Durham, North Carolina. Dissertation: &ldquo;On Reading Nature: Romanticism, Textuality, and the Alps.&rdquo;&nbsp; Supervisor: Robert Gleckner. Committee Members: Fredric Jameson, James Rolleston, Clyde de L. Ryals, Thomas Pfau.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size: small;">MA in Philosophical Aesthetics, 1986. Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto, Canada. Thesis: &ldquo;Owen Barfield's Aesthetics: Worldview and Poetic Consciousness.&rdquo;<em> </em>Director: Calvin Seerveld.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size: small;">BA in Comparative Literature (English and German), 1979. UC Riverside, Riverside, California.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size: small;">BFA in Music (piano performance), 1973. California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, California.</span></p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:17:57
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    [Edited_Date] => 2017-11-30 09:28:33
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    [MemberID] => 1538
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Terence
    [Last_Name] => Elliott
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => terry.elliott@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Instructor II
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 20b
    [Phone] => 270-745-5768
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; Writing in the Disciplines</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Biography
    [Section_Value2] => <p>I teach liberal education at WKU.&nbsp; Some people call it &lsquo;gen ed&rsquo;, but I call it liberal education.&nbsp; I teach&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&ldquo;Introduction to College Writing&rdquo;, &ldquo;Introduction to Literature&rdquo;, and &ldquo;Writing in the Disciplines&rdquo;.&nbsp; I am also fond of Oxford commas.</p>
<p>I have taught grades 8-12 for ten years before University and ran my own chimney repair business ten years before that.&nbsp; My wife and I own and operate a fifty acre sheep farm in Hart County, KY.&nbsp; We shear them ourselves.&nbsp; It is hard messy work just like writing and reading.&nbsp; Trust me on this.</p>
<p>I am fond of shiny tech, but I am also a fond user of old technologies like 3X5 cards and ink laden newspapers.&nbsp; Western is a place to connect with folks like me and a place for me to connect with folks like you, digitally or face-to-face or any other way that presents itself.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Teaching:
    [Section_Value3] => <p>WKU, Continuing Instructor,&nbsp; 2004-present</p>
<p><span>Hart County High School, Teacher,&nbsp; 1994-2004</span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => Research
    [Section_Value4] => <p>Weblog Self-Efficacy in First Year College Writing Environments</p>
<p>Toni Morrison&rsquo;s Beloved:&nbsp; A Cognitive Linguistic Analysis</p>
<p>Hashtag Chats and Rhetorical Facilitation</p>
<p>Social Capital in Professional Educational Groups:The WKU Writing Project</p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:26:25
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-09-12 09:21:05
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Nikolai
    [Last_Name] => Endres
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => nikolai.endres@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 133a
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/pdf_files/endres_cv_2018.pdf
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>World Literature; <span>British Literature; Mythology; Gay and Lesbian Literature; Literary Criticism (graduate); International Cinema; London in Literature; Writing Across the Disciplines</span></span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Nikolai Endres received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2000. As professor at Western Kentucky University, he teaches Great Books, British literature, classics, mythology, critical theory, film, and gay and lesbian studies. He has published on Plato, Ovid, Petronius, Gustave Flaubert, Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, E. M. Forster, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Mary Renault, Gore Vidal, and others. He is currently on sabbatical and writing a literary biography of American novelist Patricia Nell Warren, author of the famous gay novel&nbsp;</span><em>The Front Runner</em><span>. His next projects are pornographic representations of canonical gay texts and a queer reading of the myth and music of Richard Wagner.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
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    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:29:46
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:10:06
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    [MemberID] => 1541
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Jane
    [Last_Name] => Fife
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jane.fife@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 129
    [Phone] => 270-745-3634
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/full_time-curriculum_vitae/fife_cv.pdf
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to Composition; Writing in the Disciplines; Argument and Analysis; Advanced Composition; Practicum in One-to-One Writing Instruction</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research Interests:
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Dr. Fife&rsquo;s research interests include composition pedagogy, composing practices, attention processes of writing and reading, emotional aspects of composing, digital literacies, social media activism, rhetorical strategies of&nbsp;contemporary satire, multimodal composing, responding to student writing, and the circulation of writing within and beyond the academy.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>Jane Fife earned degrees at Indiana University and University of Louisville.&nbsp; When not reading or talking/writing about recent reading, she likes to visit historic sites with her family or spot bugs for her husband to photograph on hikes in the woods. Snape is her favorite Harry Potter character, although she thinks she is most like Hermione Granger and could stand to be a bit more like Minerva MacGonagall.</span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p><span>Dr. Fife believes that the most important components of learning are motivation and curiosity. These elements have to be supplied by the learner, but they can often be activated by the teacher, so that&rsquo;s what good teachers have to learn to do.</span></p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:32:27
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    [Edited_Date] => 2017-07-10 10:12:08
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    [MemberID] => 4895
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Jessica
    [Last_Name] => Folk
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jessica.folk@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 20d
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/pdf_files/folk_cv_2018.pdf
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    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Creative Works
    [Section_Value2] => <div style="margin: 0;">
<p>Jessica has performed and subsequently published two spoken word poems, &ldquo;I See You&rdquo; and &ldquo;Once is Enough&rdquo;, as well as a short nonfiction piece, &ldquo;Sing Us a Song&rdquo;, with Ghost City Press in 2016. She wrote a short film titled &ldquo;Five&rdquo;, which was featured in the African American Short Film Series in 2015-16. She wrote and produced a music video for the song &ldquo;Home Forever&rdquo; on behalf of Beautiful Mess Productions. Her graduate thesis script &ldquo;Poster Girl&rdquo; has placed in numerous national screenwriting competitions, including the California Women&rsquo;s Film Festival (2016), the Write Room Screenplay Competition (2016), the West Field Screenwriting Awards (2014), and the New York Screenplay Contest (2014). She wrote for Pocket Gems&rsquo; Episode app &ndash; a create-your-own adventure story, creating a series of episodes for their platform in 2014-15.</p>
<span style="font-family: Calibri;"><span style="font-family: Times;"><br /></span></span></div>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>I grew up watching countless movies, but it wasn&rsquo;t just about watching them for entertainment. I&rsquo;d study them, analyze them, watch them over and over again until I understood how they worked, how they functioned as pieces of storytelling. I wanted to know how I hoped beyond all reason that the Titanic would miss the iceberg despite the historical record. I wanted to test whether I could hold my breath as long as Buttercup when she falls into the lightning sand in <em>The Princess Bride</em>. I sought to create that feeling of empowerment I got every time I watched <em>Norma Rae</em> stand up on that factory workbench. I turned to screenwriting &ndash; tearing apart the films to their barest elements, so I could recreate their emotional power, their narrative flair, in my own way. This is what I seek to teach my students.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Everyone has a story to tell. The idea that every story that can be told <em>has </em>been told is nonsense. Sure, the main story trends and themes have been conquered &ndash; we&rsquo;ve seen them, we recognize them &ndash; but you haven&rsquo;t told <em>your </em>version of the story yet. Every writer has their own unique spin on any narrative &ndash; like witnesses to a crime, you have gone through life, gathering different perspectives. When students dig deep and find that unique perspective, that&rsquo;s when their true storytelling abilities shine.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>My writing interests also go beyond screenwriting. I have an avid interest in the Young Adult fiction genre. I seek to focus on the representation of women in all genres of writing, bringing strong female characters to the center of my stories. I also make sure to focus on representing the LGBTQ+ community as often as possible, telling stories that go beyond the typical &ldquo;coming out&rdquo; stories we often see in mainstream media, showcasing instead, stories I wish existed when I was growing up.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I will continue to challenge my students to push beyond what they expect stories to be, to seek a truth in their writing in the safety of the classroom setting.</p>
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Robert C.
    [Last_Name] => Hale
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    [Title] => Department Head
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 135b
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<p>My primary teaching area is 19th-century British literature.&nbsp; Professors Ed Bratton and R. B. Miller sparked my passion for the poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats when I was an undergraduate at the University of Tennessee.&nbsp; At Louisiana State University where I earned my MA and PhD, I also became interested in Victorian literature, particularly fiction, and turn-of-the-century literature of Britain and the United States, under the tutelage of Elsie Michie and J. Gerald Kennedy.&nbsp; With mentoring from my major professor Michelle Mass&eacute; at LSU, I also expanded my interest in women&rsquo;s literature, feminist criticism, and psychoanalytic approaches to literature.&nbsp;&nbsp;In all my classes, I strive to help my students become better readers, writers, and thinkers and to encourage them to reach across disciplines into areas such as history, visual art, performing arts, religious studies, and popular culture to integrate their learning and make meaning of literature, culture, and their places in the world.</p>
<p>My main research area is the poetry of William Wordsworth.&nbsp; Often noted as a poet who writes about childhood and children, Wordsworth also wrote about mothers and fathers.&nbsp; Much of my research centers on Wordsworth's representation of mothers, how and why he depicts them, and what his treatments teach us about his poetry. I&rsquo;ve also published on Scottish poet and playwright Joanna Baillie and African American poet Langston Hughes.&nbsp;</p>
<p>After spending thirteen fulfilling years teaching at Monmouth College in Illinois, I am happy to return to the South to live, work, write, and think. I am fortunate to have colleagues who make student learning their priority and who strive to challenge and nurture students to do their very best work.&nbsp; Most of my time outside of school is spent with my wife raising our two children--the most challenging and gratifying job of my life.</p>
</div>
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Dawn
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    [Office] => Cherry Hall 109e
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    [Section_Value3] => <p>Dr. Dawn Hall is finishing her seventeenth year at WKU, ranging from a pedagogical consultant at the CITL to teaching English in Academic Support/SUS with two directorships (GWS/SUS). In 2007, she received the University Faculty Award for student advising.&nbsp;She teaches film, English, popular culture studies, and gender at WKU and has co-created/taught Sundance Study Away and Gender and Media Study Abroad courses.</p>
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    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Debra
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    [Office] => Cherry Hall 13
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span><span>Introduction to College Writing</span></span>; Introduction to Literature<span><span>; Writing in the Disciplines</span></span></p>
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    [Section_Value3] => <p>I earned my B.A and M.A. right here at Western Kentucky University and after teaching part time for several years, I worked on my doctorate at the University of Mississippi (1997-2004), focusing on dramatic literature.&nbsp; Having completed my coursework and beginning the written exams, I discovered that Western was hiring full-time instructors, so I returned to WKU, returned to what I love doing the most&mdash;being in the classroom, being with the students, in other words, teaching.</p>
<p>I have been back at WKU for the past several years and at times feel as if I have never left. &nbsp;However, I did bring back to Kentucky a new husband, an adult son, and a new appreciation for the area that I left.&nbsp; I hope to finish out my career teaching right where it all began so many years ago:&nbsp; in Cherry Hall at Western Kentucky University.</p>
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Jerod
    [Last_Name] => Hollyfield
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    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 114
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; Introduction to English Studies; Documentary Film; Film Adaptation; Film Genres; Studies in World Literature; Introduction to the Cinema; Introduction to World Cinema; <span class="st">Topics in World Cinema</span>; <span class="st">Film Studies Capstone</span></p>
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    [Section_Value3] => <p>Dr. Jerod Ra&rsquo;Del Hollyfield earned his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University and his&nbsp;Master&rsquo;s in English and B.S. in Journalism and Electronic Media from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. His research led him to pursue his current book project, &ldquo;Adapting Empires: The Victorian Novel and the Postcolonial Filmmaker in Hollywood,&rdquo; which combines his interests in literature, film, and postcolonial theory.&nbsp; Previously,&nbsp;Dr. Hollyfield&nbsp;taught English and digital media at LSU and UT. His work has been published in<em> Settler Colonial Studies, Atlantikos</em>, <em>CineAction</em>, <em>Film International</em>, and several edited collections, including&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/World-Cinema-Visual-Arts-Perspectives/dp/085728438X" target="_blank"><em>World Cinema and the Visual Arts</em></a>&nbsp;(2012) and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Postcolonial-Film-Resistance-Routledge-Advances/dp/0415716144" target="_blank"><em>Postcolonial Film: History, Empire, Resistance</em></a>&nbsp;(2014).&nbsp;</p>
<p>Dr. Hollyfield is also an award-winning filmmaker whose work has played at numerous international and Oscar-qualifying film festivals.&nbsp; His most recent film, "Goodfriends," was endorsed by several national disability advocacy groups and is currently available to rent or own through <a href="http://www.zamoxis.com" target="_blank">www.zamoxis.com</a>. He is the creator of <em>The Assisted Stories Project</em>, a collection of video essays&nbsp;that aims to preserve and promote the narratives of the American South's elder population, which is available through <a href="http://www.wku.edu/english/assisted-stories.php">WKU English&rsquo;s website</a>.</p>
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    [First_Name] => Ted
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    [Section_Value2] => <p>Dr. Hovet&rsquo;s research interests are in early cinema, 19<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;century popular entertainment, and pedagogy.&nbsp; He has published in several journals including&nbsp;<em>The Quarterly Review of Film and Video</em>;&nbsp;<em>Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition and Culture; American Studies; Literary London,&nbsp;</em>and<em>&nbsp;19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century</em>.&nbsp; He has received grants to conduct research at the Getty Museum, the British Film Institute, and the British Library</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Ted Hovet earned his B.A. from Macalester College (1987) and his M.A. and PhD in English from Duke University (1990, 1995).&nbsp; He has taught at WKU since 1995.&nbsp; Shortly after arriving at WKU he worked with several colleagues in Potter College to develop a film studies minor, which began in 2000.&nbsp; In 2010, thanks to coordinated efforts in English, the School of Journalism and Broadcasting, and Potter College, WKU now has a film major.&nbsp; Dr. Hovet regularly teaches courses in the film minor/major, especially Film Theory, World Cinema, and History of Narrative Film.&nbsp; He also teaches composition and Introduction to English Studies.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p><span><span>One of my greatest passions as a teacher and scholar is the world of early cinema.&nbsp; During this period a film exhibitor would stitch together a program of short movies from a wide variety of choices, perhaps combining a serious adaptation of a literary classic with a "trick" film that made people and objects disappear in a smoky explosion. &nbsp;The exhibitor would often stand beside the screen to enlighten and entertain the audience with a running commentary.&nbsp; I find that early film exhibition serves as an inspiring metaphor for classroom teaching and for student learning.&nbsp; The instructor must creatively combine a variety of materials from a number of different sources, presenting them to a class in a coherent and engaging &ldquo;program.&rdquo; In turn, the student must &ldquo;exhibit&rdquo; what he or she learns in the classroom by presenting this knowledge through writing, speaking, and other kinds of creative/intellectual work.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></p>
<p><span>&nbsp;</span><span><span>Though student &ldquo;exhibitions&rdquo; may begin in the classroom, I also direct students to engagement opportunities outside of the classroom, where student clubs and organizations, conferences, and publications provide a means to exhibit learning in new and challenging ways.&nbsp;</span></span></p>
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    [First_Name] => Sandra
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; American Studies [Topics: Utopias/Dystopias, Justice in America, Dissent]; Survey of American Literature to 1865; Special Topics [American Short Story, American Gothic Literature]; Honors Special Topics [Transatlantic Gothic Literature]; Studies in 19<sup>th</sup>-Century American Literature; Studies in American Literature [Responses to Poe: Bicentennial Reflections]; American Short Story; American Romanticism; American Realism and Naturalism; Seminar in American Authors [Poe and Melville, Hawthorne and James in Italy]; Introduction to Japanese Culture [study abroad course]; The Warrior and the Poet: Japanese Literature in Translation [study abroad course]; Gothic Literature in Italy [study abroad course]; Responses to Italian Art and Architecture: Hawthorne and James [study abroad course]</p>
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    [Section_Value2] => <p>American Romanticism, Gothic literature, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, the short story</p>
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    [Section_Value3] => <p>Sandra Hughes, a native of western Kentucky, earned her B.A. in English, Spanish, and psychology at Kentucky Wesleyan College.&nbsp; After completing an M.A. in English at Marquette University in Milwaukee, she taught English for three years in Chiba, Japan.&nbsp; Upon returning to the U.S., she obtained her Ph.D. in American literature from the University of Georgia, where she was also a Robert E. Park Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow.&nbsp; For the past eight years, she has taught at WKU, where she won the Potter College and University Teaching Awards.&nbsp; She has taken students on month-long study abroad trips to Japan in 2008 and Italy in 2011.&nbsp; She has published work on Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry James, and Louisa May Alcott, and has delivered conference papers in Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, the U.K., and the U.S.&nbsp; She co-founded the Faculty Social Organization at WKU, co-advises the English Club, and currently serves on the editorial board of <em>The Edgar Allan Poe Review</em>.&nbsp; An avid traveler, she has visited 17 countries or territories, and hopes to add more soon.&nbsp; Her Labrador retriever mix, Sophia Pawthorne, is the English Club mascot.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p>As a teacher of first-year writing, I all too often hear students say something like &ldquo;I know I&rsquo;m a terrible writer,&rdquo; or &ldquo;I'm just not good at English.&rdquo;&nbsp; If left unchallenged, such comments can become self-fulfilling prophecies.&nbsp; Because I hold a firm belief that every student can do something well, I try to vary classroom activities so each student has a chance to realize his or her potential.&nbsp; Some students contribute meaningfully to discussions, some write strong journal entries they can share with the class, others prove to be skillful at peer editing, and still others excel in class debates about current events.&nbsp; I want my classroom to be a place where students cooperate rather than compete, so I ask students who are good at a certain task to help those who are having trouble, with the understanding that tutor-learner roles will shift based on the activity in which the class is engaged.</p>
<p>Teaching general education classes is an important part of an English Department faculty member's job since close reading, critical thinking, and effective writing are at the very heart of what we do in English.&nbsp; I ask my general education students to do several types of writing for different purposes or groups of intended readers in order to enhance their awareness of their rhetorical situation.&nbsp; Since I view writing as a process, I ask my students to prepare multiple drafts of each essay they submit.&nbsp; Near the end of the semester, I require that they revise an earlier paper for a grade because I want them to realize that writing, like thinking, is never finished.&nbsp;</p>
<p>Whether I am teaching first-year writing, a literature survey, or a literary topics course for English majors or graduate students, I seek to communicate my enthusiasm for the material to the class and to encourage a high level of student involvement.&nbsp; I see myself as responsible for creating a positive learning environment that makes students feel comfortable, yet intellectually challenged.&nbsp; I want my students to question and analyze what they read, not to settle for a facile interpretation of the text.&nbsp; Indeed, while I am dedicated to giving my students a detailed introduction to major periods and movements in American literature, I am less interested in teaching them a single, definitive interpretation of each text we study than in teaching them how to read and interpret literature for themselves.</p>
<p>I have spent over three years of my life teaching in Japan, most recently with KIIS in 2008.&nbsp; As a teacher, I have learned a great deal from <em>kyudo</em>, or Japanese archery.&nbsp; When novices begin to study <em>kyudo</em>, they are given neither a bow nor arrows.&nbsp; They practice the proper form for drawing the bow with a flexible cord, sometimes for as long as a year, until they earn the teacher&rsquo;s permission to proceed to the bow.&nbsp; Then they learn the proper stance and balance for drawing the bow itself, still without an arrow.&nbsp; Eventually, they proceed to firing arrows without trying to hit the target.&nbsp; It is only after a great length of time that a student begins to aim at the center of the target.&nbsp; Watching my Japanese high school students practice <em>kyudo</em> showed me the importance of patience, of process, and of high expectations.&nbsp; I am deeply dedicated to the process of becoming a better teacher, of pushing myself and my students toward higher levels of achievement.&nbsp; As Thoreau writes in <em>Walden</em>, &ldquo;In the long run men hit only what they aim at.&nbsp; Therefore, though they should fail immediately, they had better aim at something high.&rdquo;</p>
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Tom C.
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    [Email] => tom.hunley@wku.edu
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    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 131a
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    [Section_Value2] => <p>Poetry Writing, Creative Writing Pedagogy, Literary Editing, American Poetry, and World Poetry<br />Potter College Faculty Research/Creativity Award winner, 2008</p>
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    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>Tom C. Hunley holds degrees from University of Washington, Eastern Washington University, and Florida State University.&nbsp; He is the author of four full-length poetry collections, most recently <em>PLUNK</em> (Wayne State College Press, 2004); six chapbooks, most recently <em>Scotch Tape World </em>(Accents Publishing, 2014); and two textbooks, most recently <em>The Poetry Gymnasium: 94 Proven Exercises to Shape Your Best Verse</em> (McFarland &amp; Co., Inc., 2012).&nbsp; He is the co-editor, with Alexandria Peary, of <em>Creative Writing Pedagogies for the Twenty-First Century</em> (Southern Illinois University Press, 2015). He has also written for a variety of literary publications such as <em>TriQuarterly</em>, <em>New York Quarterly</em>, <em>Five Points</em>, <em>The Writer</em>, <em>North American Review</em>, <em>New Orleans Review</em>, <em>Rattle</em>, <em>Crab Orchard Review</em>, <em>Verse Daily</em>,&nbsp;<em>The Writer&rsquo;s Chronicle, Atlanta Review</em> and<em> Poetry Daily</em>.&nbsp; His poems have been featured several times on Garrison Keillor&rsquo;s NPR program, The Writer&rsquo;s Almanac.&nbsp; In addition to writing his own poetry and prose, he is the book review editor for <em>Poemeleon</em> and the director/founder of Steel Toe Books.&nbsp; He and his wife, Ralaina, have been married since 1996, and they have three sons.&nbsp; In his spare time he enjoys playing guitar and bass guitar.</span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p>Fundamental to my teaching is the fact that I enjoy my students.&nbsp; After all, without them, I wouldn&rsquo;t be a teacher.&nbsp; I try to have an impact on them, but I know for a fact that they have an impact on me.&nbsp; As Peter Elbow wrote in <em>Writing Without Teachers</em>, &ldquo;students can learn without teachers, even though teachers cannot teach without students.&rdquo;&nbsp; I view my role as that of a guide, a facilitator, and a more experienced member of the class.&nbsp; I&rsquo;m not a judge, an advocate for any particular social agenda, or a dispenser of knowledge.&nbsp; I have been an outspoken critic of the &ldquo;workshop&rdquo; approach to teaching creative writing.&nbsp; In my book, <em>Teaching Poetry Writing: A Five-Canon Approach</em> (Multilingual Matters LTD., 2007, New Writing Viewpoints Series), I contend that the workshop model is a grossly inefficient method that has achieved widespread acceptance more because of its convenience for instructors than because of any measurable pedagogical value.&nbsp; Critique is one valuable aspect of creative writing instruction, but it is not so important that it ought to take up the bulk of class time.&nbsp; In my creative writing classes, the majority of class time is spent on a rigorous battery of writing exercises based on the five canons of rhetoric: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery.&nbsp; In &ldquo;Diving In: An Introduction to Basic Writing,&rdquo; Mina Shaughnassy quotes Leo Strauss&rsquo;s advice to &ldquo;always assume that there is one silent student in your class who is far superior to you in head and in heart.&rdquo;&nbsp; How different this attitude is from the ones I sometimes hear expressed by writing instructors!&nbsp; I believe that if I respect my students enough to have high expectations for them, they will meet and surpass those expectations.&nbsp; As far as that silent student with the superior head and heart is concerned, I want to draw her out of her silence.&nbsp; I want him to lead class discussions, actively critique the writing of other students, and share his own writings with the class. I want my class to be a safe but challenging place where she can discover herself and explore the world around her.</p>
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Office Management</span><br /><span>Student Worker Manager</span><br /><span>Supply Manager</span><br /><span>Web Maintenance</span><br /><span>Budget Management</span><br /><span>Procurement Card Management</span><br /><span>Travel Management</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => collin.massie898
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-02 08:01:11
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:11:42
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1550
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Angela
    [Last_Name] => Jones
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => angela.jones@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor and Coordinator, Internship Program
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 115
    [Phone] => 270-745-5771
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/documents/jones_cv_2018.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to College Writing; Bu</span><span>siness Writing;</span><span> Technical Writing;</span><span> Co-Op Education in English I and II (internship courses);</span><span> Editing and Publishing;</span><span> Advanced Professional Writing Workshop (professional writing capstone course)</span></p>
<p><span>&nbsp;</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Angela Jones earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from Eastern Illinois University and her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas.&nbsp; Before coming to WKU, she held a faculty position at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pennsylvania, and gained additional teaching experience in several diverse settings, including a medium-security correctional center in Illinois and a technical college in Indiana.</p>
<p>Dr. Jones enjoys working with students to improve both their writing processes and products, including a variety of academic and workplace genres. &nbsp;She also coordinates the English department&rsquo;s internship program, where she collaborates with community members to generate internship placements for English majors, collects applications for those placements, and teaches the internship course that accompanies each student&rsquo;s experience. &nbsp;For the WKU community, she regularly conducts workshops on creating effective job-application materials and advised <em>Aret&eacute;</em>, the student-produced newsletter of the Honors College, for five years (2006&ndash;2011).</p>
<p>In addition to her work at WKU, Dr. Jones participates actively in the Bowling Green community. &nbsp;In 2006, she joined the board of directors of the Bowling Green International Festival, and she has served as the president of that nonprofit board since 2011.&nbsp; Her regular yoga practice led her to complete a teacher training; in 2011, she became a Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT-200) and co-founded a community yoga studio.&nbsp; She volunteers for border collie rescues and the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:45:24
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-23 13:26:14
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)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5270
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Christopher
    [Last_Name] => Keller
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => christopher.keller@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Director of Honors College; Associate Professor, Honors College
    [Office] => HCIC 1034
    [Phone] => 270-745-3171
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => 
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Christopher Keller is the Associate Director of the Honors College at WKU and Head of the Honors Academy. Originally from Houston, Texas, he comes to WKU by way of previous faculty and administrative roles in Connecticut, Hawaii, and Texas. He earned a B.A. in English from the University of Texas at Austin and a PhD in English from the University of Florida. His research focuses on twentieth and twenty-first century multiethnic literatures and writers in the United States, especially Gloria Anzald&uacute;a and Toni Morrison. He regularly teaches courses in American literature, composition and rhetoric, and technical communication, and when possible, he incorporates service-learning and community-engagement activities into his courses. In particular, he likes developing partnerships with local animal shelters and doing volunteer work with them. Having previously taught honors study abroad courses in Ireland and in Italy, he hopes to do additional study abroad and study away teaching at WKU in the future. Outside of work, he enjoys watching college football, running, hiking, mountain biking, scuba diving, and exploring new cities and natural landscapes. One of his life-long goals is to become a decent tennis player. He has a long way to go on that.&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => denis.mujic
    [Added_Date] => 2018-02-01 09:06:53
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-08 07:42:09
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 3996
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Gillian
    [Last_Name] => Knoll
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => gillian.knoll@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 111
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/pdf_files/knoll_cv_2018.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
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    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses:
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to Literature; Survey of English Literature I; Early Modern British Literature</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Education:
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Maryland, College Park, 2012.</p>
<p>M.A. in English Literature from the University of Maryland, College Park, 2003.</p>
<p>B.A. English Literature (with Honors) from the University of Michigan, 2001.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Research Interests:
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Early modern literature; Shakespeare; Drama; Cognitive linguistics; Gender and sexuality; Literature and philosophy</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Bio:
    [Section_Value4] => <p>Gillian Knoll studies and teaches literature from early modern England, specializing in drama by Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Her focus, in the classroom and in her research, is on how language shapes and represents inner life in early modern texts. Currently she is working on a book that uses tools from cognitive linguistics to explore sensory and spatial metaphors that dramatize erotic desire in Renaissance plays. Her article, &ldquo;How to Make Love to the Moon: The Erotics of Distance in John Lyly&rsquo;s <em>Endymion</em>,&rdquo; was published in the Summer 2014 issue of <em>Shakespeare Quarterly</em>. Dr. Knoll&rsquo;s latest essay, &ldquo;Binding the Void: The Erotics of Place in <em>Antony and Cleopatra</em>,&rdquo; will appear in <em>Criticism</em> in 2016.</p>
<p>Before coming to WKU, Dr. Knoll taught courses on early modern literature, drama, and composition at the University of Maryland, where she received her Ph.D. in 2012. She spent two years as Director of Educational Mentoring at Thinking Organized, an educational coaching organization based in Washington, DC, which helps students develop strategies for organization and time management, as well as language and cognitive processing skills. Here at WKU, Dr. Knoll teaches courses on early modern literature and is co-sponsor of the English Club. She enjoys taking students to the theater, especially to see productions of Shakespeare&rsquo;s plays.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => benjamin.nally211
    [Added_Date] => 2015-07-27 14:56:32
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-28 08:22:16
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1551
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Alison
    [Last_Name] => Langdon
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => alison.langdon@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor of English and Advisor in English, PCAL Faculty Fellow
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 116
    [Phone] => 270-745-5708
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/documents/langdon_cv_2018.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; Introduction to the Major; Writing in the Disciplines; Medieval Literature; Survey of British Literature; Special Topics: Arthurian Traditions; Chaucer; Dante; Senior Seminar; Colloquium: Creation as Re-Creation: Adapting Literary Texts and Beyond; Literature of Medieval and Renaissance Europe (Honors)</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Dr. Langdon is the editor of&nbsp;<em>Animal Languages in the Middle Ages: Representations of Interspecies Communication&nbsp;</em></span><span>(Palgrave, 2018) and&nbsp;<em>Postscript to the Middle Ages: Teaching Medieval Studies through Umberto Eco&rsquo;s</em></span><span>&nbsp;</span><em><span>The Name of the Rose&nbsp;</span></em><span>(Syracuse University Press, 2009). She has published articles</span><em><span>&nbsp;</span></em><span>in journals such as&nbsp;</span><em><span>Medieval Feminist Forum, The Chaucer Review,</span></em><span>&nbsp;</span><em><span>Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching,</span></em><span>&nbsp;</span><em><span>The Old English Newsletter,</span></em><span>&nbsp;and</span><em><span>&nbsp;Romance Notes.</span></em><span>&nbsp;She has received grants to conduct research at the Huntington Library, the Library of Congress, and the British Library. Her current research projects center on the liminality of human/animal identity in the medieval imagination.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Alison (Ganze) Langdon hails originally from the San Francisco Bay Area. She earned Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees in English from Arizona State University and a PhD in medieval literature from the University of Oregon.&nbsp; Before coming to WKU in 2007, she held a position as Assistant Professor of English at Valparaiso University in Indiana.&nbsp; She is a member of the Medieval Academy, the New Chaucer Society, the Society of Medieval Feminist Scholars, and the Medieval Association of the Midwest, serving for the latter as a member of the Executive Council and as Convener of Conferences. In 2014 she was appointed co-editor of <em>Enarratio</em>, a journal of medieval studies. In addition to teaching at WKU she also serves as undergraduate literature advisor and as the managing editor of <em>The Ashen Egg,</em> the English department&rsquo;s annual journal of analytical essays on literature, rhetoric, linguistics, film, and popular culture, which she founded in 2012.</p>
<p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><br /></span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p>Dr. Langdon&rsquo;s teaching encompasses a wide range, from general education courses to specialized seminars in medieval literature.&nbsp; Her goals as a teacher of English are fourfold: to cultivate students&rsquo; awareness of the power and beauty of language, to develop their intellectual awareness of being a part of the human experience while recognizing the diversity of that experience, to help them develop critical thinking skills and the ability to express their ideas clearly and effectively, and to foster independent learning. In 2015 Dr. Langdon was the recipient of the Potter College and Western Kentucky University teaching awards.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><span style="font-family: Palatino Linotype;"><br /></span></p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:46:31
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-23 14:02:45
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1552
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => David
    [Last_Name] => LeNoir
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => david.lenoir@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor, Director of Composition, and Advisor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 100b
    [Phone] => 270-745-5712
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Rhetoric and Writing; Introduction to College Writing; Advanced Directed Study; Critical Approaches to Literature in Secondary Curriculum</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:47:44
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:12:28
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4894
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Daniel
    [Last_Name] => Liddle
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => daniel.liddle@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 7k
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
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    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span>Dr. Liddle is a native of the Chicago-land area. He received his B.A. in English from Illinois State University, his M.A. in Professional Communication from Clemson University, and his PhD in Rhetoric and Composition from Purdue University. His research focuses on the intersection of visual design and technical communication, with a special interest in the growth of video and animation. His dissertation, "Beyond Animation: Toward A Rhetoric of Motion Design for Technical and Professional Writing," proposed a set of rhetorically grounded design principles for animation.&nbsp;His most recent article, &ldquo;Emerging Guidelines for Communicating with Animation in Mobile User Interfaces,&rdquo; published in&nbsp;</span></span><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><em>Proceedings of the International Conference on the Design of Communication</em></span><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span><em>,</em></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span>&nbsp;compares the animation design guidelines provided by Microsoft, Apple, and Google. Before coming to WKU in 2017, he worked with the Purdue Online Writing Lab, managing the production of videos on rhetoric and writing.</span></span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => collin.massie898
    [Added_Date] => 2017-07-10 10:20:39
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-09-04 08:15:49
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1553
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Deborah
    [Last_Name] => Logan
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => deborah.logan@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 106
    [Phone] => 270-745-3342
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to Literature; British Survey II; World Literature; Victorian Literature; Victorian Literature and Culture</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>A native of Scranton, Pennsylvania, I am a graduate of Hamilton College, Clinton NY (Summa cum Laude, English and Asian Studies, 1988). Following graduate work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (English MA 1991; Victorian Literature PhD 1997), I began teaching at WKU in 1997 and, since 2007, serve as Senior Editor and General Manager of&nbsp;<em>Victorians Journal of Literature and Culture&nbsp;</em>(formerly&nbsp;<em>Victorian Newsletter</em>). Professional affiliations include MLA, NAVSA, Victorians Institute, RSVP, Martineau Society, and Harriet Martineau Sociological Society. In addition to both a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend (2002) and an NEH Fellowship (2004-05), I have been selected for a Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship in the Senior Research category. I&rsquo;ll be pursuing my project, &ldquo;Indian Women Writing in English during the Colonial Period,&rdquo; in Kolkata, India (2012). Publications include:</span></p>
<p><strong><span>Monographs:</span></strong></p>
<p><span><em>Harriet Martineau, Victorian Imperialism, and the Civilizing Mission.</em>&nbsp;Ashgate, 2010.</span></p>
<p><span><em>The Hour and the Woman. Harriet Martineau's "somewhat remarkable" Life</em>. N. Illinois UP, 2002.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Fallenness in Victorian Women's Writing. 'Marry, stitch, die, or do worse.'</em>&nbsp;U Missouri P, 1998.</span></p>
<p><strong><span>Editions:</span></strong></p>
<p><span><em>Harriet Martineau and Ireland: Post-famine Reconstruction</em>. Lehigh UP, 2012.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Harriet Martineau. Unpublished Letters</em>.<em>&nbsp;</em>Lehigh UP, 2011.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Lives of Victorian Political Figures: Florence Nightingale,&nbsp;</em>Pickering &amp; Chatto, 2008.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Collected Letters of Harriet Martineau,&nbsp;</em>5 vols. Pickering &amp; Chatto, 2007.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Harriet Martineau: History of England and Military Reform</em>, 6 vols. Pickering &amp; Chatto, 2005.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Harriet Martineau's Writing on the British Empire</em>, 5 vols. Pickering &amp; Chatto, 2004.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Harriet Martineau's</em>&nbsp;<em><span>Illustrations of Political Economy</span></em>.&nbsp;<em>Selected Tales.</em>&nbsp;Broadview Press, 2004.</span></p>
<p><span><em>Writings on Slavery and the American Civil War by Harriet Martineau</em>. N. Illinois UP, 2002.</span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p>My teaching philosophy is simple and direct. The goal of teaching, in my view, is to help students learn how to think for themselves, and to that end, I encourage original thinking that can be demonstrably based on such primary tools as critical reading, critical thinking, and critical writing. Literary analyses are only partially subjective, requiring awareness of the socio-cultural, rhetorical, and literary contexts in which texts are written and to which they respond. While establishing those contexts is central to my literature classes, my approach is to offer minimal lecturing in favor of class discussion, facilitating an environment in which the risks associated with original thinking and its articulation are encouraged and fostered.</p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 09:49:37
    [Edited_By] => page.harrison324
    [Edited_Date] => 2017-04-13 09:08:36
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)
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(
    [MemberID] => 5097
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Collin
    [Last_Name] => Massie
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => collin.massie898@topper.wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Student Office Assistant
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 135
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
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    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2017-09-25 15:20:28
    [Edited_By] => caroline.mason448
    [Edited_Date] => 2017-12-08 14:16:01
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)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5533
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Megan
    [Last_Name] => Miller
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => megan.miller@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 132
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Megan Miller earned both her bachelor&rsquo;s and master&rsquo;s degrees at Southern Illinois University.&nbsp; Her favorite class to teach is Introduction to Literature, and when she doesn&rsquo;t have her nose in a book, She enjoys spending time with her two dogs and two cats &ndash; and occasionally, she enjoys the company of human friends.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => collin.massie898
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-11 08:23:48
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-08 13:15:50
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1517
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Kimberly
    [Last_Name] => Nessler
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => kimberly.nessler@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Office Associate
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 135a
    [Phone] => 270-745-3046
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Administrative Duties
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Student Registration Assistance<br />Course Scheduling <br />Faculty Hiring Coordination<br />Classroom Technology Assistance<br />Physical Space &amp; Event Management<br />Administrative Support<br /><br /></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-03 10:41:38
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:13:24
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1584
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Peggy D.
    [Last_Name] => Otto
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => peggy.otto@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 109f
    [Phone] => 270-745-5710
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/full_time-curriculum_vitae/otto_cv.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; Writing in the Disciplines; Argument and Analysis; Language and Communication; Composition Theory and Practice in Writing Instruction</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>I earned my B.A. in Secondary Education and M.A. in English at Western Kentucky University and my Ph.D. in Rhetoric &amp; Composition at the University of Louisville.&nbsp; I have been a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Writing Project, the Bread Loaf Rural Teachers Network, and the Apple Corporation Computer-Assisted Learning initiative.&nbsp; My research field is literacy studies with a special interest in non-traditional and working-class literacies.&nbsp; My presentations at state, national, and international conferences have included topics as diverse as H.G. Wells, American women journalists of the Progressive Era, the Federal Writers&rsquo; Project, and oral histories of southern shirt factory workers.&nbsp; Currently, I am engaged in research on the online literacy practices of readers of young adult literature.&nbsp; I am also engaged in ongoing ethnographic research on the effects of home demonstration clubs on the literacy practices of mid-twentieth century rural women.&nbsp; In addition to directing the WKU Writing Project, I am a member of the&nbsp; Literacy in the Common Core Collaborative of the National Writing Project, engaged in designing and testing professional development models for Writing Across the Curriculum.&nbsp;</span></p>
<p><span>Before completing my Ph.D., I taught high school English and French in Kentucky and Tennessee. I taught in the English Education program at Western Illinois University from 2008-2011.&nbsp; Although I taught part-time for WKU for a number of years in the 1980s and 90s before earning my doctorate, I will be beginning my first year of full-time teaching for WKU in fall 2011.&nbsp; I am pleased to be returning to the hill and eager to work with English students and department faculty in Cherry Hall as well as public school teachers in the surrounding areas.</span></p>
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(
    [MemberID] => 1557
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Alexander
    [Last_Name] => Poole
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => alex.poole@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 6a
    [Phone] => 270-745-5780
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>English as a Second Language English; Introduction to College Writing English; Writing in the Disciplines English; Language and Communication English; English Language English; History of the English Language English; Theories of Second Language Acquisition English; TESL Methods and Materials English; TESL Internship English; Internship in TESL English; Integrated TESL English; Teaching and Testing ESL Grammar</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>Alex Poole (PhD, Oklahoma State University, 2003) is an applied linguist whose interests include focus on form instruction, Spanish-English bilingualism, and reading strategies. He regularly publishes articles on these topics and presents at national and international conferences. Dr. Poole directs the ESL Endorsement/TESOL Graduate Certificate programs at WKU. He also teaches courses in composition, TESOL methodology, and pedagogical grammar, among others. When not teaching, advising students, or researching, Dr. Poole lectures on issues related to English language learners and reviews scholarly submissions to peer-reviewed journals.</span></p>
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:13:48
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    [MemberID] => 5530
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Merrall
    [Last_Name] => Price
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => merall.price@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor of English
    [Office] => WAB 225
    [Phone] => 270-745-8985
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value3] => <p>Dr. Merrall Price is originally from west Wales. She has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Rochester with an emphasis in medieval literature. She was associate dean of University College for seven years; before that she was in the English Department at&nbsp;Oklahoma State in Stillwater. She has two dogs who are spoiled rotten, and she is a member of Fountain Square Players.</p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-11 08:12:09
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-08 13:16:11
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1558
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Kelly
    [Last_Name] => Reames
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => kelly.reames@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 112
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/full_time-curriculum_vitae/reames_cv.pdf
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    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to Literature; American Literature Survey II; American Novel; Writing in the Disciplines; Contemporary Literature</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Kelly Reames received her B.A. at Vanderbilt University and her M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina.&nbsp; Before coming to WKU in 2002, she taught for two years at Oklahoma State University.&nbsp;Courses she regularly teaches include Survey in American Literature II, The American Novel, and Contemporary Literature.&nbsp; Her interests include life writing and&nbsp;African American literature. She is&nbsp; interested in how authors represent the relationship between physical bodies, perception, and identity, including how people interpret others' bodies.&nbsp;She is the founder of the Lillian Hellman Society and editor of its newsletter.&nbsp;Her publications include <em>Toni Morrison's </em>Paradise: <em>A Reader's Guide</em> and <em>Women and Race in Contemporary U.S. Writing: From Faulkner to Morrison</em>.&nbsp; She is currently&nbsp;working on a book on Lillian Hellman and is also under contract with the University of South Carolina press to write&nbsp;a book on Dorothy Allison for their Understanding Contemporary American Literature series.</p>
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1560
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Jeffrey
    [Last_Name] => Rice
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jeffrey.rice@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor and Advisor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 16c
    [Phone] => 270-745-5998
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to College Writing; Writing in the Disciplines; Business Writing; Technical Writing; Special Topics in Professional Writing; Theory and Practice of Rhetoric; Technology and Writing</span></p>
<p><span><br /><strong>Study Abroad Courses:</strong></span></p>
<p><em>Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS) Study Abroad Program In Greece</em>; &ldquo;The Road To Athens&rdquo;: Travel Writing and the Greece Experience; Ancient Greek Rhetoric: Past and Future; Professional Writing for Transnational and Transcultural Purposes</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p><strong></strong>Professional and Technical Writing, Rhetorical Theory, Digital Media Studies, Pedagogical Theory, Writing Theory</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Jeffrey (J. A.) Rice earned a BA degree from The Ohio State University, an MA degree from the University of Vermont, and a PhD in Rhetoric and Composition Studies from the University of Florida (UF). Prior to coming to WKU, he was the Writing Coordinator for First-Year Writing at UF. Dr. Rice&rsquo;s research focuses on the philosophic and applied relationships between rhetorical theory, digital media technology, and writing, and appears in numerous journals and edited collections, such as <em>Composition Forum, Business Communication Quarterly, Educational Theory and Philosophy, IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, </em>and <em>Writing Posthumanism, Posthuman Writing. </em>His most recent book, <em>Beyond Postprocess</em> (Utah State University Press, 2011), is a co-edited collection that reevaluates what it means to write and to study writing in the digital age. Dr. Rice regularly teaches in WKU&rsquo;s Professional Writing program and especially enjoys teaching expository, argumentative, technical/professional, and study abroad writing courses. In addition to his research and teaching, he has worked as Case Study Developer for <em>Technical Communication in the Twenty-First Century </em>(Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2009), as well as an organizational communication consultant for several businesses in the greater Nashville area.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p><span>My philosophy of teaching derives from one central theoretical premise: writing is a technology of change.</span><strong>&nbsp;</strong><span>While such an assertion certainly points to the rhetorical changes writing can produce in the world-at-large, it also suggests how every act of writing is both a distinct and original rhetorical moment. Given these assumptions, I believe teaching writing means mentoring students to productively engage with the inventive opportunities new writing technologies, knowledges, and problems present to the contemporary classroom. I therefore encourage students to experiment with a variety of writing opportunities and then use those experiences to develop their own rhetorical approaches to ever-changing intellectual, informational, and professional contexts. In this way, then, I consider teaching writing a philosophic endeavor, where student writers should depart from the known in an effort to write the new.</span></p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 10:04:15
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:14:12
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1561
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Dale
    [Last_Name] => Rigby
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => dale.rigby@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 110a
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/full_time-curriculum_vitae/rigby_cv.pdf
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to College Writing; Documentary Film; Creative Nonfiction Writing; Advanced Composition; Writing Memoir and Autobiography; Advanced Writing Workshop; Graduate Writing Workshop</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Creative Nonfiction.&nbsp; Manhole covers.&nbsp; American Studies.&nbsp; Dr. John Brinkley, &ldquo;the Goat Gland Doctor&rdquo;.&nbsp; Social Construction of Sport. &nbsp;The Iconography of Chess. &nbsp;Rhetoric of the Body.&nbsp; Male circumcision.&nbsp; Gender Studies. &nbsp;Mappa Tassie.&nbsp; Montaigne.&nbsp; The Education of Children.&nbsp; Documentary Film.&nbsp; &ldquo;The Year of the Pig&rdquo;.&nbsp; Composition Studies. &nbsp;Social-expressivism.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Born in Los Angeles, Dale Rigby was visited myriad summer nights by his seminal literary influence, the succubi that were (and remain) the play-by-play radio essays of the Dodgers&rsquo; Vin Scully.&nbsp; His first creative success, &ldquo;The Secret of the Stolen Jewels,&rdquo; an unabashed homage to the Hardy Boys, won first prize in Collingwood Elementary School&rsquo;s literary contest (published, he now cringes to confess, under the <em>nom de plume</em> of Irving Rutherford).</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; His family skedaddled to Bowling Green, Ohio, when he was twelve. Come high school, beyond his role as a backup point guard on the hardwood (a role significantly reduced when his coach discovered that he called in sick (sic) to push wood in the Ohio High School Chess Championship), he took league medalist honors on the golf course, while co-writing and co-starring in two independent school productions, the holocaust drama &ldquo;Frank Ann&rsquo;s Log&rdquo; and a three-act Monty Pythonesque play, &ldquo;Gay Boys in Bondage.&rdquo; &nbsp;He would also co-star in Edward Albee&rsquo;s bittersweet &ldquo;The Zoo Story.&rdquo;&nbsp; His father, a professor of political science, visited his high school class to lecture on the constitutional right of any student who so desired to sew the moniker of &ldquo;M&hellip;F&hellip;K&hellip;R&rdquo; onto the hand-me-downs that were their tattered U.S. Army jackets.&nbsp; There was laughter and literacy to be modeled in an American high school zeitgeist as deliciously light on standardized testing and union-busting as it was reverently rich in lagniappe and freedom of speech.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Driving while reading to California for college, he and his girlfriend imbibed aloud Tom Robbins&rsquo; &ldquo;Even Cowgirls Get the Blues&rdquo; and John Irving&rsquo;s &ldquo;The World According to Garp.&rdquo; He went on to earn an undergraduate degree in English at U.C. Berkeley while working in the Mechanic&rsquo;s Institute Library and as a journeyman crumpet baker in San Francisco&rsquo;s Inner Sunset; he paid his tuition--$300.00 a quarter--from his tip jar (he, gently, asks today&rsquo;s students whether that figure sounds anachronistic to them because, well, perhaps, the election of Ronald Reagan begat the ideological &ldquo;starving of the beast&rdquo; manifest in their generation&rsquo;s numbing level of student loan debt?). &nbsp;Said same lover and he spent weekends trying to visit every single nude beach in Northern California whilst reading Joan Didion and Larry McMurtry and sipping Asti Spumante.</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; That career goal checked off, he boarded the Greyhound to Iowa City, where he would be granted an M.A. in American Studies and an M.F.A. in Nonfiction Writing, during which time he won the 1990 Annual Hames Prize from the United States Chess Federation for the most artful Master-level postal chess game.&nbsp; &ldquo;The Dead Skin Scrolls,&rdquo; an essay occasioned by his circumcision at age twenty received a Notable Mention in Robert Atwan&rsquo;s <em>Best American Essays</em> series. &nbsp;His mentor at the University of Iowa was and will forever remain the irrepressible scholar and writer and teacher and gardener and rascal Carl Klaus.</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Dale earned his doctorate in 2000 at the University of Missouri-Columbia, whereupon he was hired to teach nonfiction writing at Western Kentucky University.&nbsp; Here he remains, directing graduate theses, advising the WKU Knights chess club, mentoring first-year graduate student teachers, exposing first-year writing students to the habits of mind of the fair dinkum <em>essay</em>, nonfiction writers to the likes of Lauren Slater and Richard Rodriguez and Eula Biss and &ldquo;the fatal slantindicular futility of fact,&rdquo; documentary film students to Emile de Antonio and Barbara Kopple and Guy Madden, chairing the creative writing committee, presenting AWP and CCCC panels with previous WKU students, sallying forth with essays seeking to tell it slant, to write of the me to get at the not-me.&nbsp; His most recent piece, &ldquo;My Playing Weight,&rdquo; appeared this Spring in the 15<sup>th</sup> Anniversary issue of <em>SportLiterate</em>, and was later chosen for the 2011 first prize in the category of &ldquo;Best Chess Writing: mainstream media&rdquo; by the Chess Journalists of America. &nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This slumbering summer, listening on MLB.com to Vin Scully&rsquo;s inimitable essays, visiting his artist mother at her pristine log cabin outside of Frankfort, Michigan, he began dreaming of a year-long sabbatical living near the garden of Sir George Somers in Bermuda and finding the finishes touches for a memoir in the form of an annotated chess game he played against Jude Acers in the French Quarter of pre-Katrina New Orleans.&nbsp; Wish him luck, ok?</p>
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 10:06:39
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1563
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Walker
    [Last_Name] => Rutledge
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => walker.rutledge@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor and Honors Advisor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 9
    [Phone] => 270-745-5762
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Beginning his university-level teaching career in Oklahoma when he was twenty years old, Assistant Professor Rutledge has taught innumerable correspondence courses, off-campus courses, study-abroad course, television courses, and campus courses. The following may not be his complete list, but it is pretty close:</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;1.&nbsp;&nbsp; English for Upward-Bound Students</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2.&nbsp;&nbsp; English for High-School Junior Scholars</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 3.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Grammar &amp; Composition I&mdash;for ninth grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Literature I&mdash;Introduction to Literature for ninth grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 5.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Grammar &amp; Composition II&mdash;for tenth grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 6.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Literature II&mdash;World Literature for tenth grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 7.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Grammar &amp; Composition III-- for eleventh grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Literature III&mdash;American Literature for eleventh grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 9.&nbsp; &nbsp;High-School Grammar &amp; Composition IV&mdash;for twelfth grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 10. High-School Literature IV&mdash;British Literature for twelfth grade&mdash;by correspondence at WKU</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11. English 049&mdash;a pilot course in Remedial English that later evolved into English 055</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 12. English 055&mdash;Remedial English</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 13. English 101, later 100&mdash;Freshman Composition</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 14. English 102&mdash;Freshman Composition II</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 15. English 102 Honors Combined with Psychology 100 Honors</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 16. English 102 Honors Combined with English 283 Honors</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 17. English 102H combined with History 120H, Psychology 100H, and Biology 148H</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 18. English 104 Honors&mdash;Introduction to Linguistics</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19. English 104 Honors Combined with Psychology 100 Honors</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 20. English 183, later 283, and still later 200--Introduction to Literature</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 21. English 199 Honors&mdash;Special Topic in Advanced Freshman Composition</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 22. English 200 Honors Combined with Psychology 199 Honors</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>English 202 English Honors Forum&mdash;The Registrar officially lists the following sub-topics as separate courses, just as PE 101 Activities are listed as separate courses.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 23. English 202-Sub-Topic #1 English Honors Forum&mdash;Literary Chronology &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 24. English 202-Sub-Topic #2 English Honors Forum&mdash;Literary Women&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 25. English 202-Sub-Topic #3 English Honors Forum&mdash;Fulbright Lectures</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 26. English 202 Sub-Topic #4 English Honors Forum&mdash;World Literature</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;27. English 202-Sub-Topic #5 English Honors Forum&mdash;The Short Story</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;28. English 202-Sub-Topic #6 English Honors Forum&mdash;Career Opportunities&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;29. English 202-Sub-Topic #7 English Honors Forum&mdash;The Contemporary&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;30. English 202-Sub-Topic #8 English Honors Forum&mdash;Southern Writers&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;31. English 202-Sub-Topic #9 English Honors Forum--Poetry&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;32. English 202-Sub-Topic #10 English Honors Forum--Drama</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;33. English 202-Sub-Topic #11 English Honors Forum--Language</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;34. English 202-Sub-Topic #12 English Honors Forum--Fiction</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;35. English 202-Sub-Topic #13 English Honors Forum--Writing&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;36. English 202-Sub-Topic #14 English Honors Forum&mdash;The Hero in Literature</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;37. English 290&mdash;English Topics Abroad (scheduled for summer 2016)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 38. English 300&mdash;Writing in the Disciplines</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 39. English 380&mdash;Masterpieces of British Literature (taught on-site in England)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 40. English 381&mdash;British Literature Before 1798</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 41. English 382&mdash;British Literature Since 1798</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 42. English 390&mdash;Masterpieces of American Literature</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 43. English 391&mdash;American Literature I (American Literature Before the Civil War)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 44. English 392&mdash;American Literature II (American Literature Since the Civil War)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 45. English 398&mdash;Honors Hemingway &amp; Faulkner</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 46. English 399 Honors Special Topic&mdash;American Literature of the Sixties</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 47. English 399 Honors Special Topic&mdash;American Literature of the Great Depression</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 48. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Literary Works of James Agee &amp; Thomas Wolfe</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 49. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Southern Gothic</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 50. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Small Town in American Literature: From Winesburg to Lake Wobegon</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 51. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Bible as Literature</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 52. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Dramas of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 53. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Dramas of Eugene O&rsquo;Neill</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 54. English 399 Honors Special Topic/ Honors 300&mdash;Literary New England</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site at various places in New England)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 55. English 399 Honors Special Topic/ Honors 300&mdash;The Life and Literature of New York City</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site in New York City)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 56. English 399 Honors Special Topic/ Honors 300&mdash;The Life and Literature of Chicago</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site in Chicago)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 57. English 399 Honors Special Topic/ Honors 300&mdash;Cuban Literature and Culture</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site in Cuba)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 58. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Humanistic Tradition in Britain</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site in England, Scotland, and Wales)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 59. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;Literary London</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site in London)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 60. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;The Literary World of Jane Austen: Fact, Fiction, &amp; Film</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(taught on-site in England)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 61. English 399 Special Topic&mdash;Robert Penn Warren</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 62. English 411&mdash;Directed Writing (travel writing, a mystery novel, etc.)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 63. English 455 Honors&mdash;American Drama</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 64. English 459&mdash;Modern Drama</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 65. English 482&mdash;Shakespeare&nbsp;(to be taught on-site in England in the fall of 2016)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 66. English 486&mdash;The Eighteenth Century (taught in Oklahoma)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 67. English 490&mdash;The American Novel (taught in Oklahoma)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 68. English 499&mdash;Directed Study (Alice Walker, James Dickey, Jesse Stuart, Garrison Keillor, James Fenimore Cooper, Flannery O&rsquo;Connor, &amp; various other writers)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 69. English 499 Honors&mdash;Alternative American Writers (team-taught)</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 70. Honors 100&mdash;Colloquium on the Sixties</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 71. Honors 303&mdash;Thesis Preparation</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 72. Honors 403&mdash;Thesis Research</p>
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 73. Honors 404&mdash;Senior Thesis</p>
<p>Of the hundreds of literary study-tours that Assistant Professor Rutledge has led&mdash;with multiple field trips often scheduled on the same day--favorite locales have included Oxford, Mississippi; Oak Park, Illinois; Nantucket Island, Massachusetts; New York City, New York; Chicago, Illinois; London, England; and Havana, Cuba.&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Assistant Professor Walker Rutledge has achieved several curious distinctions:&nbsp;&nbsp; he started the English Department&rsquo;s Honors Program over thirty years ago and has overseen it ever since; he has taught more <em>different </em>English courses than anyone else in the history of the Western Kentucky University; and believing that nothing brings literature to life more readily than appreciating its origins, he holds the dubious record for organizing and conducting the most field trips and study-tours for students.&nbsp;</p>
<p>When not teaching, grading essays, or researching his courses, Assistant Professor Rutledge plays the jazz piano. He invites you to email him at walker.rutledge@wku.edu.</p>
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    [Edited_Date] => 2016-04-11 12:36:54
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(
    [MemberID] => 1564
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Lee
    [Last_Name] => Spears
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => lee.spears@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 109b
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Business Writing; Technical Writing; Writing in the Disciplines</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Professional writing pedagogy, service learning, fundraising letters</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>Dr. Spears holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Kentucky. She has published articles on professional writing in the&nbsp;</span><span>Journal of Technical Writing and Communication</span><span>, Business Communication&nbsp;</span><span>Quarterly</span><span>, and the&nbsp;</span><span>Journal of Business and Technical Communication</span><span>. She has chaired the Scholarships and Awards (undergraduate) Committee in the English Department for over 10 years.</span></p>
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(
    [MemberID] => 3997
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Trini
    [Last_Name] => Stickle
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => trini.stickle@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 128
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Custom_Value1] => 
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    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Writing in the Disciplines; Language and Communication</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Biography
    [Section_Value2] => <p>I completed my PhD in fall of 2015. I also have an M.A. in Applied English Linguistics with a TESL certificate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; an M. A. in Humanities from California State University, Dominguez Hills; and a BA in English from Minot State University, Minot, North Dakota.</p>
<p>I have taught a variety of linguistics and writing courses as well as skill-based English as a Second Language courses. Having been involved in research the last several years, I am very happy to return to the classroom to teach within the general education program in the English department. Additionally, my favorite course to teach is introduction to syntax, or grammar, so teaching the Language Communication course (ENG 302) is the venue where I can really &ldquo;geek out&rdquo; and share some really complex aspects of language that we so often take for granted.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Pedagogical Interests
    [Section_Value3] => <p>I am interested in using the study of dialect as a way to address prejudice in society. I am involved in creating secondary and post-secondary curricula that uses the interview, print, and online materials of the <em>Dictionary of American Regional English</em> (<em>DARE</em>) to introduce students to linguistics, sociolinguistics, and language variation. The goal for the <em>Discovering Dare</em> curricula is to provide students the opportunity to better understand and value the languages of all speakers.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value4] => <p>My research focuses on interactions involving persons whose communication processes are affected by acquired or developmental cognitive issues (e.g., dementia, autism). I use conversation analysis and interactional linguistics (syntactic, phonetic, and prosodic analyses) to document how participants use verbal, vocal, and embodied resources to collaboratively produce meaningful social actions. Specifically, I rely on these methods to highlight the interactional resources and practices employed by the participants as they navigate their conversations. My hope is that this work will contribute to better communication practices for practitioners, caregivers, and family members as they share in conversations with their patients or loved ones.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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    [Active] => 1
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    [Added_Date] => 2015-07-27 14:57:23
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(
    [MemberID] => 1565
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Judith
    [Last_Name] => Szerdahelyi
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    [Email] => judith.szerdahelyi@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 16b
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Custom_Value3] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Introduction to College Writing; Writing in the Disciplines; Intermediate Composition; Business Writing; Technical Writing; Advanced Composition; Technology and Writing; Directed Writing</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Education
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph. D. &nbsp; English. Rhetoric and Composition. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro</p>
<p>M.A. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; English Language and Literature. E&ouml;tv&ouml;s Lor&aacute;nd University, Budapest, Hungary</p>
<p>B. A. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; English and Hungarian Languages and Literature. Ho Si Minh Teacher Training College, Budapest, Hungary</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Judith Szerdahelyi earned her Ph.D. from The University of North Carolina-Greensboro with an emphasis on Rhetoric and Composition. Her teaching and research interests include composition theory and pedagogy, computers and writing, multimodal technology in higher education, creative nonfiction, and non-native English-speaking writing instructors. In addition to a co-authored textbook on writing published in Hungary, her publications include book chapters and academic articles published by IGI Global, Cambria Press, and <em>Computers and Composition Online</em>. She is the editor of the <em>Kentucky English Bulletin.</em></p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 10:16:00
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5531
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Rick
    [Last_Name] => Thompson
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    [Email] => rick.thompson@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 7a
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Rick Thompson graduated from the MFA program from the University of Montana. This led him to teach developmental comp, intro comp, research writing, creative writing, and intro to lit. He is a native of Muhlenberg County, KY, and his personal interests&nbsp;include karaoke, travel, craft beer, concerts, Texas Hold&rsquo;em, grilling, sauteing, braising, roasting, searing, and frying.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
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    [Added_By] => collin.massie898
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-11 08:22:04
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-08 13:16:25
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1566
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Marya Davis
    [Last_Name] => Turley
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => maryadavis.turley@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Instructor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 20f
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
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    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to College Writing; Introduction to Literature; Writing Across the Disciplines</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => 
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span style="font-family: Cambria; font-size: small;">&nbsp; <br /></span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span><span>Professor Marya Davis Turley earned an Associate's Degree in General Studies (emphasis in health sciences), a Bachelor's Degree in English and Allied Language Arts and a Master's Degree in English from Western Kentucky University.</span></span></p>
<p><span><span>After working as an on-air radio personality, a business manager for a mental health practice, and as a full-time instructor for English as a Second Language International, Professor Turley joined WKU's Department of English in 2004.</span></span></p>
<p><span><span>Her interests include the oral and written histories of the South Central Kentucky region, particularly those of the South Union Shakers, and the use of bibliotherapy and writing in therapeutic practice.&nbsp;</span></span></p>
<p><span><span>In her spare time, Professor Turley enjoys spending time with family and friends, reading, and watching late-night reruns of&nbsp;<em>Frasier</em>.</span></span></p>
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    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
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    [Added_By] => tomitha.blair
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 10:16:46
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:15:17
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)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1569
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Elizabeth
    [Last_Name] => Winkler
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => elizabeth.winkler@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 113
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/english/pdf_files/winkler_cv_2017_aug.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>English as a Second Language; Introduction to Linguistics; Introduction to College Writing; Writing in the Disciplines; English Grammar; Linguistic Analysis; Sociolinguistics and Psycholinguistics; Theories of Second Language Acquisition; Teaching and Testing ESL Grammar</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Creole languages (specifically Limonese Creole), gender, and Kpelle vocabulary (Kpelle is a Mande language spoken in Liberia).</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>Elizabeth Grace Winkler earned degrees at Ohio University and Indiana University. Before coming to WKU, she held faculty positions at Columbus State University in Georgia and the University of Arizona, Tucson. In addition to her teaching experience, she has taught English as a second language at several universities in the US and in Monterrey, Mexico. She currently serves on the International Advisory board for the journal of Linguistics and Literature, a publication of the University of Costa Rica.&nbsp; She is also currently serving as a consultant to a group creating orthography of the Kpelle language, a language for which Winkler has authored the only existing dictionary. Winkler has authored an introductory linguistics text that is currently in its second edition as well as published scholarly journal articles and book chapters in edited volumes on creoles and gender.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span>Personal webpage:&nbsp;</span><a href="http://people.wku.edu/elizabeth.winkler/">http://people.wku.edu/elizabeth.winkler/</a></p>
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Philosophy
    [Section_Value4] => <p>I have two very different kinds of university teaching experiences each requiring different approaches to classroom learning. I have been teaching English as a second or foreign language for almost 20 years. The two approaches that most guide my teaching are student-centered learning and communicative language teaching.&nbsp; I believe that the students must be invested in the learning process before it becomes a meaningful experience for them. &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><span>Although my emphasis is on communicative language teaching, I use aspects of other methods in my day-to-day teaching. For example, I believe that students need a firm control of the grammar of a language to be able to successfully perform the communicative activities that I construct. In addition, I vary my teaching style and methods throughout each class in recognition of the fact that not all students have the same learning style. I have been able to help international students move from textbook-centered teaching practices in which they are passive receivers of information to student-focused learning in which they take responsibility for their learning. True acquisition of a language entails the ability to function in the day-to-day activities of the language community, which necessitates that students have the ability to analyze cultural events and act appropriately</span></p>
<p>The teaching of content courses in linguistics is somewhat different, though experiential learning is still my focus. The goal of any course is to make it both interesting and challenging and to show how the knowledge being gained by the students is of practical application or gives them insight into their lives, their work, or their cultural experiences. Another goal is to enhance their critical thinking skills and problem-solving abilities, skills necessary to any occupation they choose. I try to expose students to current and historical approaches and theories. It is important that they understand the base on which our current knowledge of the field of Linguistics is built. Ahistoristical approaches to any discipline only enable students to repeat the same process as all those who have gone before rather than building on what is already known.&nbsp;</p>
<p>Finally, I encourage the students in all my classes to be innovative and independent thinkers who are grounded in the core knowledge of the field and prepared to tackle the tasks they will encounter when they leave my classroom and enter their own classrooms as teachers or their own cultural communities as citizens with open and curious minds.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
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    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 10:20:43
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    [Edited_Date] => 2017-11-30 09:28:14
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(
    [MemberID] => 3439
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Alison
    [Last_Name] => Youngblood
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => alison.youngblood@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 6b
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Language and Communication; Linguistic Analysis&nbsp;</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <div>Second language vocabulary acquisition</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Corpus linguistics</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Teacher training</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Interdisciplinary applications of TESOL</div>
    [Section_Field3] => Education
    [Section_Value3] => <div>Ph.D. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from the University of Central Florida (2014)</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>M.A. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from the University of Central Florida (2007)</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>B.S. in Economics, Florida State University (2003)</div>
    [Section_Field4] => Biography
    [Section_Value4] => <p><span>Alison Youngblood has over 10 years of classroom experience in both the ESL and EFL markets. &nbsp;She began her teaching career as an Assistant Language Teacher with the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program. &nbsp;She also worked as a Corporate Language Trainer for Samsung Human Resources Development Center in South Korea. &nbsp;In the United States, Alison was an ESL instructor at the Intensive English Programs for the University of Central Florida and the University of North Florida. &nbsp;At the University of Central Florida, she worked as an ESL specialist on a Race to the Top initiative preparing STEM professionals for secondary math and science teaching positions. In addition, she ran&nbsp;</span><em>Soy Culto y Soy&nbsp;</em><em>Biling&uuml;e</em><span>, a grant-funded adult ESL program, that served over 2,000 second language learners in the central Florida community.&nbsp;</span></p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => ann.childers281
    [Added_Date] => 2014-07-08 12:59:10
    [Edited_By] => collin.massie898
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 08:15:49
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)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4896
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Marla
    [Last_Name] => Zubel
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => marla.zubel@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 20c
    [Phone] => 270-745-3043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => http://www.wku.edu/english/pdf_files/zubel_cv_2018.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Introduction to Literature; Introduction to World Cinema.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p>World literature and cinema, Eastern European literature and film, postcolonial studies, translation studies, critical theory.&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><strong>Marla Zubel </strong>studies and teaches twentieth century literature and film in a global context.<strong> </strong>Her current research examines a neglected archive of Eastern European cultural encounters with the Third World. She is particularly interested in the ways writers and filmmakers of the former Socialist Bloc turned to documentary, and other non-fiction genres and forms, in order to represent the relationship between the local and the global at the height of the Cold War.</p>
<p>Dr. Zubel&rsquo;s transnational and intermedial research interests greatly inform her work in the class room. In her courses students engage with theories of postcolonialism, diaspora, nationalism, and transnationalism, while carrying out close formal analysis of works of literature and film from all over the world. By examining the ways these works both shape and were shaped by the original contexts of their emergence, students are challenged to consider the ways different literary forms and forms of media make certain kinds of socio-political critique possible.</p>
<p>Dr. Zubel&rsquo;s work has&nbsp;appeared&nbsp;in the peer-reviewed journals&nbsp;<em>Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture</em>,<em>&nbsp;Postcolonial Studies</em>,<em>&nbsp;</em>and&nbsp;<em>Studies in Eastern European Cinema.&nbsp;</em>She is currently working on a book that examines the ways Eastern European&mdash;and especially Polish&mdash; literary and cinematic reportage was used to both document and&nbsp;facilitate&nbsp;Second World solidarity with the Third World in the era of decolonization.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Education
    [Section_Value4] => <p><span>Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 2017.</span></p>
<p><span>B.A. Literature; Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, 2006.</span></p>
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Faculty and Staff


Fabian Alvarez

Fabian Alvarez
- Instructor II

Dr. David Bell

Dr. David Bell
- Associate Professor

Dr. Wes Berry

Dr. Wes Berry
- Professor and Graduate Advisor

Tim Brotherton

Tim Brotherton
- Associate Professor

Bailey Cooke

Bailey Cooke
- Student Office Assistant

Dr. Lloyd Davies

Dr. Lloyd Davies
- Professor

Terence Elliott

Terence Elliott
- Instructor II

Dr. Nikolai Endres

Dr. Nikolai Endres
- Professor

Dr. Jane Fife

Dr. Jane Fife
- Professor

Jessica Folk

Jessica Folk
- Assistant Professor

Dr. Robert C. Hale

Dr. Robert C. Hale
- Department Head

Dr. Dawn Hall

Dr. Dawn Hall
- Professor

Debra Hays

Debra Hays
- Instructor II

Dr. Jerod Hollyfield

Dr. Jerod Hollyfield
- Associate Professor

Dr. Ted Hovet

Dr. Ted Hovet
- Professor

Dr. Sandra Hughes

Dr. Sandra Hughes
- Professor

Dr. Tom C. Hunley

Dr. Tom C. Hunley
- Professor

Trish Jaggers

Trish Jaggers
- Assistant Professor

Mary Johnson

Mary Johnson
- Office Associate

Dr. Angela Jones

Dr. Angela Jones
- Associate Professor and Coordinator, Internship Program

Dr. Christopher Keller

Dr. Christopher Keller
- Associate Director of Honors College; Associate Professor, Honors College

Dr. Gillian Knoll

Dr. Gillian Knoll
- Assistant Professor

Dr. Alison Langdon

Dr. Alison Langdon
- Professor of English and Advisor in English, PCAL Faculty Fellow

Dr. David LeNoir

Dr. David LeNoir
- Professor, Director of Composition, and Advisor

Dr. Daniel Liddle

Dr. Daniel Liddle
- Assistant Professor

Dr. Deborah Logan

Dr. Deborah Logan
- Professor

Collin Massie

Collin Massie
- Student Office Assistant

Megan Miller

Megan Miller
- Associate Professor

Kimberly Nessler

Kimberly Nessler
- Office Associate

Dr. Peggy D. Otto

Dr. Peggy D. Otto
- Associate Professor

Dr. Alexander Poole

Dr. Alexander Poole
- Professor

Dr. Merrall Price

Dr. Merrall Price
- Professor of English

Dr. Kelly Reames

Dr. Kelly Reames
- Associate Professor

Dr. Jeffrey Rice

Dr. Jeffrey Rice
- Associate Professor and Advisor

Dr. Dale Rigby

Dr. Dale Rigby
- Associate Professor

Walker Rutledge

Walker Rutledge
- Assistant Professor and Honors Advisor

Dr. Lee Spears

Dr. Lee Spears
- Associate Professor

Dr. Trini Stickle

Dr. Trini Stickle
- Assistant Professor

Dr. Judith Szerdahelyi

Dr. Judith Szerdahelyi
- Associate Professor

Rick Thompson

Rick Thompson
- Assistant Professor

Marya Davis Turley

Marya Davis Turley
- Instructor

Dr. Elizabeth Winkler

Dr. Elizabeth Winkler
- Professor

Dr. Alison Youngblood

Dr. Alison Youngblood
- Assistant Professor

Dr. Marla Zubel

Dr. Marla Zubel
- Assistant Professor

 


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 Last Modified 4/24/18