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Smoking and Tobacco


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Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States

  • Cigarette smoking causes more than 480,000 deaths each year in the United States. This is nearly one in five deaths.
  • Smoking causes more deaths each year than the following causes combined:
    • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
    • Illegal drug use
    • Alcohol use
    • Motor vehicle injuries
    • Firearm-related incidents
  • More than 10 times as many U.S. citizens have died prematurely from cigarette smoking than have died in all the wars fought by the United States.
  • Smoking causes about 90% (or 9 out of 10) of all lung cancer deaths.
  • More women die from lung cancer each year than from breast cancer.
  • Smoking causes about 80% (or 8 out of 10) of all deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
  • Cigarette smoking increases risk for death from all causes in men and women.
  • The risk of dying from cigarette smoking has increased over the last 50 years in the U.S.

 

E-cigarettes: Resources for Schools - Tobacco Prevention and ...

 

Electronic Cigarettes and Overall Health: Get the Facts

  • E-cigarettes have the potential to benefit adult smokers who are not pregnant if used as a complete substitute for regular cigarettes and other smoked tobacco products.
  • E-cigarettes are not safe for youth, young adults, pregnant women, as well as adults who do not currently use tobacco products.
  • While e-cigarettes have the potential to benefit some people and harm others, scientists still have a lot to learn about whether e-cigarettes are effective in helping adults quit smoking.
  • If you’ve never smoked or used other tobacco products or e-cigarettes, don’t start.
  • Learn more here.

 

The e-cigarette aerosol that users breathe from the device and exhale can contain harmful and potentially harmful substances, including:

  • Nicotine
  • Ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deep into the lungs
  • Flavoring such as diacetyl, a chemical linked to a serious lung disease
  • Volatile organic compounds
  • Cancer-causing chemicals
  • Heavy metals such as nickel, tin, and lead

It is difficult for consumers to know what e-cigarette products contain. For example, some e-cigarettes marketed as containing zero percent nicotine have been found to contain nicotine.

 

E-cigarettes are still fairly new, and scientists are still learning about their long-term health effects. Here is what we know:

Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which has known health effects.

  • Nicotine is highly addictive.
  • Nicotine is toxic to developing fetuses.
  • Nicotine can harm adolescent and young adult brain development, which continues into the early to mid-20s.
  • Nicotine is a health danger for pregnant women and their developing babies.
 

Besides nicotine, e-cigarette aerosol can contain substances that harm the body.

  • This includes cancer-causing chemicals and tiny particles that reachdeep into lungs. However, e-cigarette aerosol generally contains fewer harmful chemicals than smoke from burned tobacco products.
 

E-cigarettes can cause unintended injuries.

  • Defective e-cigarette batteries have caused fires and explosions, some of which have resulted in serious injuries. Most explosions happened when the e-cigarette batteries were being charged.
    • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collects data to help address this issue. You can report an e-cigarette explosion, or any other unexpected health or safety issue with an e-cigarette, hereexternal icon.
  • In addition, acute nicotine exposure can be toxic. Children and adults have been poisoned by swallowing, breathing, or absorbing e-cigarette liquid through their skin or eyes.

 

Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body: Mouth and throat (oral cavity and pharynx); Esophagus, voice box (larynx); Lung, bronchus, and trachea; Acute myeloid leukemia; Liver; Kidney and renal pelvis; Stomach; Uterine cervix; Pancreas; Urinary bladder; Colon and rectum

oke and want to learn more about quitting, click her

If you use tobacco products and want to learn more about quitting, click here.

 

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References: 

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/about/osh/index.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/quit_smoking/index.htm?s_cid=osh-stu-home-nav-002

 


 

 

 

 


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 Last Modified 8/14/20