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July
Friday, July 1st
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


Saturday, July 2nd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


8:00am
  • Location: L.D. Brown Ag Expo Center Main Arena
  • Time: 8:00am

For more information: Bluegrass Miniatures

5:00pm
  • Location: Downing Student Union Auditorium
  • Time: 5:00pm

The Southern Kentucky Concert Band will present Happy Birthday America at 5 p.m. July 2 at Downing Student Union Auditorium. Admission is free.

Sunday, July 3rd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


8:00am
  • Location: L.D. Brown Ag Expo Center Main Arena
  • Time: 8:00am

For more information: Bluegrass Miniatures

Monday, July 4th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


Tuesday, July 5th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


Wednesday, July 6th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


Thursday, July 7th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


Friday, July 8th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


Saturday, July 9th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: WKU campus
  • Time: All Day

A three-week residential camp held in June and July, VAMPY offers high-ability students who have completed grades 7–10 the chance to focus on one course during six class hours each weekday plus a nightly hour-long study hall. Classes are taught by highly motivated WKU faculty and high school teachers who are thrilled to have equally highly motivated students.

Students arrive at the WKU campus from counties around Kentucky, states across the nation, and countries all over the world to form a community of diverse backgrounds and interests. For gifted and talented students who crave knowledge, academic challenge, and peers who accept them as they are, VAMPY offers a life-changing world of both learning and friendship.

The primary emphasis of VAMPY is academics. When not in class, campers participate in a wide range of activities that bring them together as a community. Ask students what the other campers are like, and they’ll respond with answers like, “family,” “accepting,” and “universally kind.” Says camper Phoebe Wagoner (VAMPY 2016-19) "Not only am I the best person I can be here, but everyone else is too. Being around people who are all being their best selves and trying to make the community as positive and as welcoming as they possibly can for everyone else is such a breath of fresh air." Many camp activities are created by their counselors, most of whom are college students who attended VAMPY themselves. While they compete in Capture the Flag or make chalk art during evening Optionals; attend cookouts, baseball games, or dances on the weekends; or play endless card games with their hallmates, campers make friendships that can last a lifetime.


Website: https://www.wku.edu/gifted/vampy/


All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

Sunday, July 10th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Monday, July 11th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Tuesday, July 12th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

8:45am - 10:30am
  • Location: Hardin Planetarium
  • Time: 8:45am - 10:30am

Hardin Planetarium will host a free, public watch party at 9:30 a.m. July 12 for NASA’s release of the first science images from the James Webb Space Telescope.

The planetarium’s Star Chamber doors will open at 8:45 a.m. with the NASA livestream beginning at 9:30. The one-hour livestream will include many full-color images, along with some interpretation from NASA subject matter experts.

For more about the planetarium, visit https://www.wku.edu/hardinplanetarium/.

Hardin Planetarium is located at 1501 State St. on the WKU campus.

6:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Location: Warren County Public Library, 1225 State St.
  • Time: 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Author David Bell will discuss his new thriller, The Finalists, at the Warren County Public Library, 1225 State St., at 6 p.m. July 12.

Bell is the USA Today bestselling author of 12 novels, including Kill All Your Darlings, Bring Her Home, Since She Went Away, Somebody I Used to Know, The Forgotten Girl, Never Come Back, The Hiding Place, and Cemetery Girl. His work has been translated into numerous foreign languages, and in 2013, he won the prestigious Prix Polar International de Cognac for best crime novel by an international author.

He is a professor of English at WKU where he co-founded and directs the MFA program in creative writing.

Wednesday, July 13th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Thursday, July 14th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

Friday, July 15th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: L.D. Brown Ag Expo Center Main Arena
  • Time: All Day

For more information: National Mountain Horse Association

Friday, July 15th: Show starts at 2:00 p.m.

Saturday, July 16th: Show starts at 11:00 a.m.

Saturday, July 16th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: L.D. Brown Ag Expo Center Main Arena
  • Time: All Day

For more information: National Mountain Horse Association

Friday, July 15th: Show starts at 2:00 p.m.

Saturday, July 16th: Show starts at 11:00 a.m.

Sunday, July 17th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Monday, July 18th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Tuesday, July 19th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Wednesday, July 20th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Thursday, July 21st
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

7:00pm - 9:00pm
  • Location: The Capitol, downtown Bowling Green
  • Time: 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Lost River Sessions LIVE! returns to the Capitol Arts Center at 7 p.m. July 21 with songwriter Brennen Leigh and a special performance by Mark Whitley. Admission is $12.50; $10 with student ID. Tickets are on sale now. This performance will be recorded for a later broadcast on WKU Public Radio.

More information

All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

Friday, July 22nd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: L.D. Brown Ag Expo Center Main Arena
  • Time: All Day

For more information: KY Junior Livestock Expo

Saturday, July 23rd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: L.D. Brown Ag Expo Center Main Arena
  • Time: All Day

For more information: KY Junior Livestock Expo

Sunday, July 24th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

5:00pm
  • Location: Downing Student Union Auditorium
  • Time: 5:00pm

The Southern Kentucky Concert Band will present "That's Entertainment" at 5 p.m. July 24 at Downing Student Union Auditorium. The concert will feature music from television, movies, theater, opera, and sports. Admission is free.

Monday, July 25th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Tuesday, July 26th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Wednesday, July 27th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

Thursday, July 28th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Friday, July 29th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Saturday, July 30th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Sunday, July 31st
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

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