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    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => James
    [Last_Name] => Baker
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    [Email] => james.baker@wku.edu
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    [Title] => Professor Emeritus; University Distinguished Professor
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    [Phone] => 
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    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Florida State University, 1968
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    [Custom_Value2] => U.S., Britain
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    [MemberID] => 5595
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Nicole
    [Last_Name] => Bettendorf
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    [Email] => nicole.bettendorf@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Instructor
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-30 13:26:48
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    [Edited_Date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5682
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => William
    [Last_Name] => Black
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => william.black@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Visiting Instructor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 236
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => http://www.wrblack.com/
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/history/documents/william_black_cv.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Rice University, 2018
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => American Religious History, Nineteenth-Century America, Civil War & Reconstruction
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Biography
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Courses
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p class="p1"><span class="s1">William Black is a graduate of the history M.A. program at Western Kentucky University and recently completed a Ph.D. in history at Rice University. His work has appeared in the <em>Journal of the Civil War Era</em>&nbsp;and the <em>Journal of Popular Culture</em>, as well as public outlets like <em>Vox</em>, the<em> Atlantic</em>, and the <em>Washington Post</em>. He is currently preparing a manuscript on the Cumberland Presbyterians, the largest evangelical denomination not to split along North&ndash;South lines during the American Civil War era.</span></p>
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    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-09-10 13:24:22
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-09-10 13:26:27
    [Show_Images] => 1
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(
    [MemberID] => 1177
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Charles
    [Last_Name] => Borders
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => charles.borders@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => South Campus C171
    [Phone] => (270) 745-2549
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
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    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => linda.todd
    [Added_Date] => 2011-06-28 03:04:48
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:45:59
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1489
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Dorothea
    [Last_Name] => Browder
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => dorothea.browder@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => 237 Cherry Hall
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 2008
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => U.S. Women, Labor
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>I focus on U.S. women's history and gender history, and am especially interested in the history of working-class women, the intersection of religion and working-class activism, race relations, and the social construction of race. I am currently researching the history of the Young Women's Christian Association's Industrial Program, which ran from 1904 through the 1940s. I explore how YWCA industrial club participants reformed the middle-class women who sought to reform them, and how they forged a nation-wide movement of working women across differences such as race, religion, nation of origin, occupation, and unionized status. My recent publication, "'A 'Christian Solution of the Labor Situation': How Working Women Reshaped the YWCA's Religious Mission and Politics" (</span><em>Journal of Women's History</em><span>&nbsp;19:2, 2007), examines how working-class YWCA members persuaded the Association to endorse a platform of labor rights at the height of the 1919-1920 Red Scare. I am also working on a document project for SUNY Binghamton's Women and Social Movements website, drawing on the YWCA Industrial Program materials.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>I regularly teach courses on U.S. women's history and the U.S. history survey, as well as the second half of the Western Civ survey. In Spring 2008 I am teaching a Special Topics (490) course that explores changes in the role that work has played in women's lives in the United States. Women have always worked, but the conditions and meanings of labor--and workers' relationship to their work--has changed for both men and women wage-earners, as has the experience and image of unpaid household labor. This course will explore the various changes as they directly affected American women economically, socially, and politically and will open up discussions of the impact of race and class as well as gender.</p>
<p>I may also periodically teach the history of sexuality class, as well as special topics courses in labor history, the social construction of race, and the history of religion and working-class activism.</p>
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    [Section_Value3] => 
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    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
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    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2011-07-26 10:12:44
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:52:10
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(
    [MemberID] => 5638
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Kate
    [Last_Name] => Brown
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => kate.brown@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 230A
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2015
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => U.S. and British Legal History, Early U.S.
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    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
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    [Section_Field3] => Biography
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    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-08-21 12:09:25
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-09-06 21:33:46
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5553
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Charles
    [Last_Name] => Bussey
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => charles.bussey@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 1975
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => 19th-Century U.S.
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
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    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:00:27
    [Edited_By] => 
    [Edited_Date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5541
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Carol
    [Last_Name] => Crowe-Carraco
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => carol.crowecarraco@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => University Distinguished Professor
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => http://people.wku.edu/carol.crowecarraco/
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/history/faculty-staff/cccvita.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1978
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Kentucky, Tudor-Stuart England, Women
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Trained in English and American History, my fields are Kentucky History, State &amp; Local History, and Tudor-Stuart England.&nbsp; My research interests are in Southern history, women, material culture, and British history.&nbsp; At present, I am working on a biography of Harry Innes, an early&nbsp; Kentucky jurist, a study of a Georgia antebellum couple, Adam Leopold and Sarah Gilbert Alexander, overviews of various Kentucky houses, women's sketches for a forthcoming African American encyclopedia, and a literacy book for adults learning to read. I am a frequent speaker across the state for civic and professional organizations and conduct numerous workshops on a variety of topics.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>I teach world history, the English history surveys, Tudor-Stuart England, Kentucky history, and the senior seminar.&nbsp; I also regularly offer an occasional seminar in both Kentucky history and British history.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:50:15
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:52:27
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1488
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Robert
    [Last_Name] => Dietle
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => robert.dietle@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor; Interim Director, School of Journalism & Broadcasting
    [Office] => JRH 214
    [Phone] => (270) 745-4144
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Yale University, 1991
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => French Revolution, European Intellectual History
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>My research reflects my interest in the fields of intellectual and cultural history.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>I teach courses on the French Revolution and Napoleon (History 422) and on the Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment (History 322). I also occasionally teach our department's course on Ancient Greece (History 305) as well as the history of sexuality (History 420).</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2011-07-26 02:31:47
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:14:14
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5170
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Marko
    [Last_Name] => Dumančić
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => marko.dumancic@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 219
    [Phone] => (270) 745-4348
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/history/documents/marko_dumancic_cv_2018-19.docx
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2010
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Cold War, Modern Russia & Eastern Europe
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => kayla.dowdy
    [Added_Date] => 2017-12-01 13:33:51
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-20 15:38:30
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1487
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Marc
    [Last_Name] => Eagle
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => marc.eagle@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 238
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Tulane University, 2005
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Latin America, Early Modern Spain
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>My work focuses on the seventeenth-century Spanish Caribbean, especially on the administrative framework that connected the region with Spain and the monarch. My dissertation was on the Audiencia of Santo Domingo, an appellate court with jurisdiction over most of the Caribbean; in it I argue that even though this tribunal faced poverty, enemy attacks, and antagonistic leadership, it was a flexible and durable, if inefficient, component of colonial administration. I have also completed several article-length studies of other aspects of seventeenth-century Spanish Hispaniola, on such topics as conflict among royal officials and the illicit slave trade to the region, while my future project will be on the relations between the Spanish and non-Spanish populations in the Caribbean region during the colonial era.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>In conjunction with the Geography/Department, I regularly teach the Introduction to Latin America survey course, and am one of the co-directors for the Latin American Studies minor program. I also teach courses on Colonial Latin America and Modern Latin America, as well as the Western Civilization I survey (soon to be World History), and upper-division and graduate courses on the history of Mexico, U.S.-Latin American relations, and the Golden Age of Spain. In the future, I hope to develop additional courses on such topics as piracy or popular culture in Latin America.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2011-07-26 02:27:07
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:07:59
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1499
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => John
    [Last_Name] => Hardin
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => john.hardin@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1989
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => African American, Africa
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p>My central scholarly interests are 20th century African American history. In 2005, the editorial board of the University Press of Kentucky unanimously approved the publication of the&nbsp;<em>Kentucky African American Encyclopedia</em>. I will be serving as one of the three general editors of this unique book. This five-year project will require over 200 contributors and have 1,200 entries. Also, I serve as an appointed member of the Kentucky Oral History Commission and the Kentucky African American Heritage Commission.&nbsp;<br /><br />My publications include the following books:&nbsp;<em>Onward and Upward: A Centennial History of Kentucky State University 1886-1986</em>&nbsp;(Frankfort: 1987) and&nbsp;<em>Fifty Years of Segregation: Black Higher Education in Kentucky 1904-1954</em>&nbsp;(Lexington: 1997). I have chapters in the following:&nbsp;<em>Community Memories: A Glimpse of African American Life in Frankfort</em>&nbsp;(Lexington: 2003) and&nbsp;<em>A Commemoration of WKU's Integration/1956-2006</em>&nbsp;(Bowling Green: 2006). Two articles have been published: "Green Pinckney Russell of Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute for Colored Persons,"&nbsp;<em>Journal of Black Studies</em>&nbsp;25 (May 1995) 5: 610-621 and "Green Pinckney Russell, Francis Marion Wood, and the Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute 1912-1929: A Study in Politics and Race,"&nbsp;<em>Filson Club History Quarterly</em>, Volume 69, No.2, 171-188.</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2011-07-27 08:46:08
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:12:42
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4346
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Tony
    [Last_Name] => Harkins
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => anthony.harkins@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 218
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => https://works.bepress.com/anthony-harkins/
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/history/documents/tony_harkins_cv_2018.pdf
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1999
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => 20th-century United States History, American Popular Culture since Civil War, American Studies
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p>My book&nbsp;<em>Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon</em>&nbsp;(Oxford University Press, 2004) won the 2005 Susanne M. Glasscock Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Humanities Scholarship from Texas A&amp;M University.&nbsp;<em>Hillbilly</em>&nbsp;draws on a wide array of popular culture genres that featured hillbilly images including literature, country music, comic strips and cartoons, films, television shows, local festivals and even the Internet to examine the evolution of one of the most pervasive and enduring icons of twentieth century American popular culture. Although often overlooked or dismissed as a base image of mass entertainment, the hillbilly, I contend, has served as a continually negotiated mythic space through which modern Americans have attempted to define themselves and their national identity and to reconcile the past and the present.</p>
<p>I have also published related articles on the hillbilly image in&nbsp;<em>Studies in American Humor</em>,&nbsp;<em>Appalachian Journal</em>,&nbsp;<em>The Journal of Appalachian Studies</em>, was the co-editor of the Media section of the&nbsp;<em>Encyclopedia of Appalachia</em>&nbsp;(Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2006) and served as a historical consultant on several film documentaries including <em><a href="http://hillbillymovie.com/">Hillbilly</a></em>(2018). My article &ldquo;Colonels, Hillbillies and Fightin&rsquo;: Twentieth-century Kentucky in the National Imagination&rdquo; appeared in the <em>Register of the Kentucky Historical Society</em> in 2015.</p>
<p>In the last few years, I have published articles in <em>Transfers </em>and <em>Middle West Review </em>that explore the origins, development and potential consequences of envisioning the great center of the nation as "the middle of nowhere" from the perspectives of both coastal commentators and self-defined "Flyover People." In particular, I investigate the impact of central transportation and communication developments (especially transcontinental passenger air travel, the interstate highway system, and television) on the changing ways Americans envisioned the cultural and geographic boundaries and intersections of the nation.</p>
<p>I am currently working on two other projects pertaining to popular culture and Appalachia. First, I am completing an article for the <em>Register of the <em>Kentucky&nbsp;</em>Historical Society</em>&nbsp;on the influential career of Julian Goodman, who was born in Glasgow, Kentucky, attended WKU and went on to be president of NBC from 1966 to 1978. Goodman was a central figure in the rise of television news and a staunch defender of press freedoms in the face of Nixon administration pressures.&nbsp; Second, I am co-editing the book<em> Appalachian Reckoning: A Region Responds to Hillbilly Elegy</em> (West Virginia Press, 2019). The book is a retort, at turns rigorous, critical, angry, and hopeful, to the long shadow&nbsp;<em>Hillbilly Elegy</em>&nbsp;has cast over the region and its imagining. But it also moves well beyond&nbsp;Vance&rsquo;s book to allow Appalachians from varied backgrounds to tell their own diverse and complex stories through an imaginative blend of scholarship, prose, poetry, and photography. Complicating simplistic visions that associate the region almost exclusively with death and decay,&nbsp;<em>Appalachian Reckoning</em>&nbsp;makes clear Appalachia&rsquo;s intellectual vitality, spiritual richness, and progressive possibilities.</p>
<p class="p1"><span class="s1">Links to my articles are available on <a title="Tony Harkins on TopScholar" href="https://works.bepress.com/anthony-harkins/"><span class="s2">TopScholar</span></a>.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>I teach the second half of the World History survey, both halves of the U.S History survey, the U.S. since 1945, History of U.S. Popular Culture since the Civil War, and graduate seminars on these topics as well as one on 20th century U.S. social and cultural history. In addition, I team-teach the American studies survey each year exploring themes such as justice, dissent, utopias/dystopias, and the American Dream.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Service
    [Section_Value3] => <p>I serve as the History Department&rsquo;s chair of public outreach and as the WKU Fulbright faculty liaison. I also am a coeditor of the journal <em>Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal</em>.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => kelly.scott
    [Added_Date] => 2016-03-04 11:56:17
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-20 13:45:11
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1325
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Janet
    [Last_Name] => Haynes
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => janet.haynes@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Office Associate
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 200
    [Phone] => 270-745-3842
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>Janet has worked for the History Department since 2012; she previously worked in Payroll for 12 years. In Fall 2013, she won the&nbsp;Staff Excellence Award in Administrative Support.</span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => carolyn.green
    [Added_Date] => 2011-07-06 01:59:26
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 10:15:47
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5554
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Robert
    [Last_Name] => Haynes
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => robert.haynes@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Rice University, 1959
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => U.S. South, Race
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:01:55
    [Edited_By] => 
    [Edited_Date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1256
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Audra
    [Last_Name] => Jennings
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => audra.jennings@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Director, Office of Scholar Development; Associate Professor, Honors Academy
    [Office] => HCIC 2039
    [Phone] => 270.745.5043
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>Honors 300: Medicine and Society in Modern America&nbsp;</p>
<p>Honors 300: Disability in America&nbsp;</p>
<p>Honors 402: Capstone Experience/Thesis Proposal Writing</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Dr. Audra Jennings directs the Office of Scholar Development and is an associate professor in the Honors Academy. Her first book,&nbsp;<a title="Out of the Horrors of War" href="http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/15574.html"><em>Out of the Horrors of War: Disability Politics in World War II America</em></a>&nbsp;(Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), analyzes the ways in which the U.S. state at mid-century defined citizenship around notions of ablebodiedness by examining the American Federation of the Physically Handicapped, a national, cross-disability social movement organization that emerged during the war.</p>
<p>Dr. Jennings is currently working on two book projects. The first,&nbsp;<em>Rethinking the Disability Rights Movement</em>, which she is writing with historian Felicia Kornbluh, is under contract with Routledge. It extends the temporal and substantive boundaries of the movement and contextualizes it as part of a larger matrix of movements for social change. The second book project, <em>To Find, Count, and Cure: Disabled Children and the New Deal State</em>, examines services for disabled children, funded by the Social Security Act of 1935 and administered by the U.S. Children&rsquo;s Bureau. The program served more than one out of every 300 American children by 1948, providing a wide range of medical services. In this project, Dr. Jennings demonstrates how the state&rsquo;s efforts to &ldquo;discover,&rdquo; &ldquo;enumerate,&rdquo; and treat disabled children reflected a vision of the citizen as able-bodied and how disability&mdash;informed by gender, race, class, and sexuality&mdash;shaped the New Deal state more broadly, defining who belonged and who should be excluded.</p>
<p>Her articles appear in&nbsp;<em>Disability Histories</em>, eds. Susan Burch and Michael Rembis (Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2014),&nbsp;<em>The Politics of Veterans Policy: Federal Policies and Veterans in the Modern US,</em><em>&nbsp;</em>ed. Stephen R. Ortiz (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2012), and&nbsp;<em>Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas</em>&nbsp;(November 2007). She is the recipient of the 2013 Disability History Association (DHA) Outstanding Article Award and the James Madison Prize from the Society for History in the Federal Government for her article "&lsquo;An Emblem of Distinction': The Politics of Disability Entitlement, 1940-1950," which appeared in&nbsp;<em>The Politics of Veterans Policy</em>.</p>
<p>She received her Ph.D. in modern U.S. history from The Ohio State University (OSU) in 2008. Dr. Jennings has received grants and fellowships from the Harry S. Truman Library, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, University College at WKU, the Department of History at OSU, the Department of Economics at OSU, the Graduate School at OSU, and the Council of Graduate Students at OSU.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => About Dr. Jennings
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Dr. Jennings is a native of Sacramento, Kentucky. She began her career at Ohio State University, Newark, where she taught U.S. history and historical methods. In 2009, she joined the WKU Honors College. At WKU, she helps students develop strong national scholarship applications and teaches honors seminars on the history of disability, medicine, and modern U.S. history in the Honors Academy. Dr. Jennings has served on several committees for the DHA and as secretary for the organization for three terms. Additionally, she is a mentor for the American Historical Association Disability History Mentorship Program. Dr. Jennings received the 2013 Citizens Award from the Student Government Association at WKU for service to the university.</p>
<p>In her free time, she enjoys running, baking, and spending time with her dog Scout.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => audra.jennings
    [Added_Date] => 2011-06-30 12:43:16
    [Edited_By] => audra.jennings
    [Edited_Date] => 2016-10-16 12:19:52
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5542
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Eric
    [Last_Name] => Kondratieff
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => eric.kondratieff@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 217
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2003
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Greek and Roman History, Historiography and Material Culture; Ethnic Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean; Roman Epic Poetry
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Educational Background
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>I earned a Bachelor's of Science in Business Management / International Finance, with a minor in Accounting and Economics from the Marriott School of Business at BYU.&nbsp;</span><span class="s1">After a decade in the corporate world, I entered a graduate program at the University of Pennsylvania where I earned my M.A. (1999) and Ph.D. (2003) in Ancient History from the interdisciplinary Graduate Group in Ancient History.&nbsp;</span>While there I studied Greek and Roman history and historiography from the original sources in Greek and Latin, as well as the material culture of the Greeks and Romans (archaeology and urban topography; commemorative art and epigraphy; economy and numismatics).</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>My main focus is on the political culture of the Roman Republic (509 to 31 BCE). This includes examinations of: elected officers who administered Rome and its growing empire; participation (theoretical and actual) of citizens in governance, i.e., through legislation, elections and unofficial political activity; the increase of individual competition and civic violence in politics; and the rise of autocratic rulers, e.g., Caesar, Augustus and their successors in the waning days of the Republic. I have published a number of articles on aspects of Roman political culture, topography, numismatics as well as Vergil's presentation of Rome, Romans and Roman landscapes in the <em>Aeneid</em>. (Abstracts and/or copies of my articles and reviews may be found here:&nbsp;<a title="Eric Kondratieff publications" href="https://wku.academia.edu/EricKondratieff">https://wku.academia.edu/EricKondratieff</a>). I also have a book under contract with Cambridge University Press on&nbsp;<em>The Tribunes of the Plebs in the Roman Republic (494-31 BCE)</em>.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value3] => <p><span>I enjoy engaging students in learning about the literature, material culture, and social-cultural constructs of ancient societies. I regularly teach upper-level courses on Greek and Roman history, and graduate-level courses on the Roman city, Augustan Rome, and Race and Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean, along with several sections of HIST 101: World History to 1500.&nbsp; My hope is to offer, over time, a wider variety of courses on the ancient world so that students with in interest in the civilizations and cultures of antiquity may broaden their knowledge and deepen their appreciation of human ingenuity and achievements in the remote past.</span></p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:01:16
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 16:37:41
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5544
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Glenn W.
    [Last_Name] => LaFantasie
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => glenn.lafantasie@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Richard Frockt Family Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 229
    [Phone] => (270) 745-4950
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/history/documents/glenn_lafantasie_cv.doc
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Brown University, 2005
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Nineteenth-Century America, Civil War and Reconstruction, Old South
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Civil War'social, political, and military history, with a particular focus on Abraham Lincoln; Ulysses S. Grant; Robert E. Lee, Gettysburg; slavery and antislavery; Southern cultural history; and the legacy of the American Revolution in the nineteenth century. My current research is focused around Lincoln and Grant for my next book, which will be published during the coming sesquicentennial of the Civil War. The book will examine the relationship between the Union's commander-in-chief and his general-in-chief and will explore the dimensions of their working partnership that led the Union so conclusively to victory over the Confederacy. The book will also take a look at the historiographical debates over whether the Civil War was a total war, how the two men used plain and straightforward language to express themselves, and how their roots in the West (the modern Midwest) influenced their words and deeds. For the Lincoln bicentennial, I will be delivering scholar papers on the sixteenth president at two major symposiums, one at Brown University and the other in Springfield, Illinois.&nbsp; I am also writing an article and a short biography Union General Manning Ferguson Force, a Medal of Honor winner from Ohio. I also serve as the Director of the Center for the Study of the Civil War in the West. The mission of the Center is to establish Western Kentucky University as the world's premier institution for research, teaching, and public dialogue on the history, culture, and contemporary implications of how the Civil War was experienced by Americans living west of the Appalachian Mountains. The Center, which is currently under development, will emphasize the interdisciplinary investigation and documentation of the Civil War in the West as a culturally, historically, geographically, and demographically complex field of study. The Center will also promote research on all aspects of the war in the western theater by supporting the work of its faculty, staff, students, and visiting scholars. It will offer to the public, as well as to the academic community, opportunities for increasing knowledge of the Civil War in the West (and particularly in Kentucky) through conferences, lectures, credit courses, publications, tours, and archival access. Details about the Center and its programs may be found at its website,&nbsp;</span><a title="WKU Civil War Center" href="https://www.wku.edu/civilwarcenter">http://www.wku.edu/civilwarcenter</a><span>.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Old South, Age of Jackson, Antebellum America, The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, The Civil War and Reconstruction, U.S. History to 1865.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:04:24
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:05:43
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5555
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Marion B.
    [Last_Name] => Lucas
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => marion.lucas@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus; University Distinguished Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 224B
    [Phone] => (270) 745-5736
    [Website] => http://people.wku.edu/marion.lucas/
    [CV] => http://people.wku.edu/marion.lucas/vitalast.html
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1965
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Old South, Civil War, and Reconstruction
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:04:15
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:05:25
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5556
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Gregory
    [Last_Name] => Marshall
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => gregory.marshall@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Instructor
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:05:01
    [Edited_By] => 
    [Edited_Date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 960
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Andrew
    [Last_Name] => McMichael
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => andrew.mcmichael@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Dean, Potter College of Arts & Letters, Professor of History
    [Office] => Fine Arts Center 200
    [Phone] => 270-745-6538
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2000
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Administrative Duties
    [Section_Value1] => <p>I came to the the Potter College of Arts &amp; Letters' Dean's office part-time in 2009 and full-time in 2010. The job of the Dean's office staff is to help faculty, staff, and students do their work with as little interference as possible. My primary duties involve: fostering research and creative activity within the college; securing outside funding through grants and fellowships; interdisciplinary and inter-college outreach and coordination; outreach to local K-12 schools and coordinating teacher education; academic program assessment, and workforce development as it relates to academic programming. I also take seriously the mission of thinking of ways to promote the interests of the college across the campus and in the community. That could involve activities as mundane as helping shepherd college curriculum through the University, to meeting with folks in the community to get feedback on our programs, to trying out new ways of showcasing the interesting, creative, and fun faculty we have in Potter College.</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>My original scholarly interest was the colonial American Atlantic World, focusing on British colonial North America and its connections with Latin America. The University of Georgia Press published my first monograph, <em>Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810</em>. My current research focuses on food and drink, most specifically in the area of alcohol consumption. I recently published several encyclopedia entries in Sage Publications' series entitled <em>Alcohol: Social, Cultural, and Historical Perspectives.&nbsp;</em>&nbsp;My chapters "Alcohol Production, 1850 &ndash; 1950,&rdquo; in <em>A Cultural History of Alcohol, Volume 5: Industry, Empire, and War (1850-1950)</em>, edited by Deborah Toner, and &ldquo;Commerce, Business, and Trade&rdquo; in&nbsp;<em>A Cultural History of Alcohol, Volume 3: The Early Modern World (1500-1750)</em>, edited by Ann Tlusty are forthcoming from&nbsp;Bloomsbury Press in 2018. Prufrock Press&nbsp; recently published my co-authored <em>Teaching Social Studies Through Inquiry</em>, and I have two more volumes under contract with them. In August 2019 I will submit a manuscript to Indiana University Press entitled <em>Prohibition</em>.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value3] => <p>I mainly teach HIST 463: The Atlantic World and HIST 341: The History of Alcohol. &nbsp;I believe that students should be challenged to think about history in new ways, that they should think about how history is packaged, sold, and &ldquo;used&rdquo; in the public space, and the ways that a knowledge of history can help them better understand the world around us. If my classes don't get students to ask questions about their assumptions about the world in which they live and their social and cultural viewpoints then I'm not doing my job. I lecture, but we also spend a great deal of time discussing readings, concepts, and problems. I have used video games to teach Western Civ and brewed beer in the History of Alcohol, and hope that my classes are as interesting and instructive for my students as they are for me.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Fields
    [Section_Value4] => <p>Atlantic World, History of Alcohol, Colonial/Revolutionary America</p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => kurt.fattic
    [Added_Date] => 2011-06-16 09:47:58
    [Edited_By] => andrew.mcmichael
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-21 14:49:15
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5546
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Jeffrey
    [Last_Name] => Miner
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jeffrey.miner@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 214B
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Stanford University, 2011
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Late Medieval Europe & Mediterranean
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p>I am a historian of late medieval Europe, broadly interested in social and economic change in the pre-modern Mediterranean. My book in progress,&nbsp;<em>Public debt and civic culture in fourteenth-century Genoa</em>, examines how the fourteenth-century explosion of public indebtedness in Genoa inflected both private and public life, drawing on a wide variety of methodologies and sources including financial records, legal privileges, sermons and poetry. I am also currently working on several articles on topics including the church's influence on medieval economic life and the role of identity in shaping Mediterranean trading networks.</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>In addition to regularly offering World Civilization I and a general survey of medieval European history, I plan to offer a courses in medieval, Mediterranean and Italian history. In the past, I have taught on a variety of subjects, including the Normans, religion and economy in the Middle Ages, Italy and the medieval Mediterranean world, and cultural encounter in medieval Sicily. In 2015, I will teach a history of the Crusades, and in future years I plan to develop courses on the pre-industrial economy, travel and cultural encounter in the Middle Ages, and a history of slavery before the trans-Atlantic slave trade.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:09:06
    [Edited_By] => 
    [Edited_Date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4184
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Patti
    [Last_Name] => Minter
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => patricia.minter@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 206
    [Phone] => (270) 745-5098
    [Website] => https://www.wku.edu/legal-studies/
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1994
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => American Legal, Civil Rights, 19th and 20th-Century U.S. and Southern
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>My recent work on law, culture, and rights includes "Law, Culture, and History: The State of the Field at the Intersections,"&nbsp;</span><em>American Journal of Legal History</em><span>&nbsp;(March 2016);&nbsp;"'The State of Slavery':&nbsp;</span><em>Somerset, The Slave Grace</em><span>, and the Rise of Pro-Slavery and Anti-Slavery Constitutionalism in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World,"&nbsp;</span><em>Slavery and Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies</em><span>&nbsp;(June 2015); and "A Legal Tourist in the Courts of London: Henry Marchant's 1771-72 London Diary and the Case of&nbsp;</span><em>Somerset v. Stewart</em><span>,"&nbsp;</span><em>Law and History Review</em><span>&nbsp;(with Sally E. Hadden), (February 2011). I am co-editor (with Sally E. Hadden) of&nbsp;</span><em>Signposts: New Directions in Southern Legal History</em><span>(University of Georgia Press, 2013) which includes my essay, "Race, Property Rights, and Negotiated Space in the American South: A Reconsideration of&nbsp;</span><em>Buchanan v. Warley</em><span>" (345-368) and the introduction to the volume. I currently serve on the Board of Directors for the American Society for Legal History and on the Board of Directors of the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky. I served as the inaugural chair of the WKU University Senate from 2000-2001 and from 2007 to 2014&nbsp;</span><span class="s1">I served as the elected Faculty Regent on the WKU Board of Regents.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Legal History, Civil Rights, American History since the Civil War, Human Rights,&nbsp;and others.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => renee.purdy
    [Added_Date] => 2015-09-22 14:54:28
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-09 12:22:33
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5271
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Alexander
    [Last_Name] => Olson
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => alexander.olson@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor
    [Office] => HCIC 1037
    [Phone] => (270) 745-4201
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2013
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => Core Faculty in the Mahurin Honors College
    [Custom_Field3] => Fields
    [Custom_Value3] => U.S. History, American Studies, North American West, Indigenous Studies, Biopolitics
    [Section_Field1] => Publications
    [Section_Value1] => <p><em><a href="http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520287730">American Studies: A User's Guide</a></em>&nbsp;(University of California Press, 2017). Co-authored with Philip J. Deloria.</p>
<p>&ldquo;Ad Hoc American Studies: Michigan and the Hidden History of a Movement,&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>American Studies</em>&nbsp;55, no. 1 (2016): 107-131. Co-authored with Frank Kelderman.</p>
<p>&ldquo;Muybridge in the Parlor,&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Journal of American Studies</em>&nbsp;50, no. 1 (February 2016): 61-80.</p>
<p>&ldquo;Citizen Stories: A New Path to Culture Change,&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Public: A Journal of Imagining America</em>&nbsp;3, no. 1 (Spring 2015). Co-authored with Elizabeth Gish and Terry Shoemaker.</p>
<p>&ldquo;&lsquo;You have rescued me from academicism&rsquo;: Selections from the Correspondence of Henry Nash Smith and Mary Hunter Austin,&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Southwest Review</em>&nbsp;96, no. 1 (Winter 2011): 50-65.</p>
<p>&ldquo;Heritage Schemes: The Curtis Brothers and the Indian Moment of Northwest Boosterism,&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Western Historical Quarterly</em>&nbsp;40, no. 2 (Summer 2009): 159-178. Winner of the Bert Fireman Award from the Western History Association.</p>
<p>&nbsp;&ldquo;Our Leschi: The Making of a Martyr,&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Pacific Northwest Quarterly</em>&nbsp;95, no. 1 (Winter 2003/04): 26-36.</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => denis.mujic
    [Added_Date] => 2018-02-01 09:15:05
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 20:24:14
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 2057
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Eric
    [Last_Name] => Reed
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => eric.reed@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor; Department Chair
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 201A
    [Phone] => (270) 745-5732
    [Website] => http://people.wku.edu/eric.reed/
    [CV] => https://www.wku.edu/history/documents/eric_reed_cv.docx
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Syracuse University, 2001
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Modern France, Modern Europe
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p>My book,&nbsp;<em>Selling the Yellow Jersey: The Tour de France in the Global Age</em>&nbsp;(University of Chicago Press, forthcoming 2014), places the history of the classic event in a global context.</p>
<p>I am developing a research project that will examine travel, global networks, and urban development in small to medium-sized cities from the mid-19th century to the 1930s.</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>I enjoy teaching a wide variety of courses including our Western Civilization survey, 20th-Century Europe, History of Sport, History of Popular Culture, and The City in History.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2011-09-20 16:52:11
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:40:57
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5548
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Juan
    [Last_Name] => Romero
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => juan.romero@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 214A
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin, 2008
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Modern Middle East
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>My research interests focus on revolutionary movements in the Middle East, Middle Eastern nationalism, western imperialism, pan-Arabism, and the Cold War in the Middle East. My book&nbsp;</span><em>The Iraqi Revolution of 1958: A Revolutionary Quest for Unity and Security</em><span>&nbsp;will be published in 2010. I am currently working on a second book project, the Lebanese civil war of 1958.and the American intervention in Lebanon the same year. This project analyzes relations between the US Marines and Lebanese militias, and peace efforts undertaken by Lebanese religious leaders.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>I teach a Middle East survey course in the fall and topic courses in the spring, some of which are History of Iraq, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, History of Iran, and History of Terrorism. I intend to develop additional courses on Arab nationalism, revolutions in the Middle East, the Ottoman Empire, and the United States and the Middle East in the near future.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:17:16
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 16:40:04
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 3313
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Andrew
    [Last_Name] => Rosa
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => andrew.rosa@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 207
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => United States, African American and African Diaspora History, African American Studies
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Dr. Andrew Rosa&rsquo;s teaching and research interests in African American intellectual and social movement history is grounded in the interdisciplinary fields African American Studies, Diaspora Studies, and American Studies. His related interests include racial foundations of academic thought, Black radicalism, comparative slavery, Black Atlantic history, and Pan Africanism.&nbsp;</p>
<p>He is a graduate of the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of African American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and is the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards for his research, including an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship from the Black Metropolis Research Consortium in Chicago and a NEH fellowship from the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture. In 2015, he was awarded the University College Faculty Award for Research and Creativity at WKU. His work has appeared in the <em>Journal of Black Studies, Race and Class, American Studies, </em>and <em>History of Education Quarterly</em>, and he&rsquo;s currently preparing a manuscript for the University of Georgia Press on the African American Scholar Activist, St. Clair Drake. Most recently, he edited <em>Many Rivers to Cross: Selected Readings in the African American Experience</em> (Kendall Hunt Publications, 2015) to support undergraduate courses in African American Studies. In addition, he thoroughly enjoys leading the Study Abroad opportunity to Trinidad and Tobago and being a part of a growing interdisciplinary and globally conscious department and program at WKU.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => renee.purdy
    [Added_Date] => 2014-02-06 10:26:28
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-09 14:39:05
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4614
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Selena
    [Last_Name] => Sanderfer
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => selena.sanderfer@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 223A
    [Phone] => (270) 745-3841
    [Website] => https://works.bepress.com/selena-sanderfer/
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2010
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => African Diaspora, Southern History, American History
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>My research interests focus mainly on southern African Americans and Black Nationalism. I am currently pursuing research related to my dissertation, which examines the participation of black lower class southerners in movements supporting territorial separatism from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. For future research I plan to continue studying the experiences of black southerners and in particular investigate the emergence and legacy of all black towns and communities.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value4] => <p>I enjoy teaching courses on the history of the African Diaspora and American history. I have taught courses in African history, American history and Western Civilization as well as special topic courses in African American history, the Atlantic World and the history of slavery.</p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => renee.purdy
    [Added_Date] => 2016-09-26 11:01:02
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 13:17:28
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5549
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => David
    [Last_Name] => Serafini
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => david.serafini@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Instructor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 224D
    [Phone] => (270) 745-6937
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => M.A., Western Kentucky University, 1997
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => U.S., Europe, World, Military History
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:25:44
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-30 13:24:58
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5557
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Richard
    [Last_Name] => Stone
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => richard.stone@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Colonial U.S.
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:06:56
    [Edited_By] => 
    [Edited_Date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5558
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Richard
    [Last_Name] => Troutman
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => richard.troutman@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 232
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 1958
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Kentucky History
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:08:14
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 12:08:36
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5550
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Tamara
    [Last_Name] => Van Dyken
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => tamara.vandyken@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor; Undergraduate Advisor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 240
    [Phone] => (270) 745-2994
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 2009
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => United States Religious History, Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism, History Education
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>My research focuses on evangelicalism and fundamentalism in late nineteenth and twentieth century America, specifically the intersection of evangelical Protestantism and American culture. Currently, I am exploring the development of evangelical feminism in America from the 1970s through the 1990s and its role in defining postmodern evangelicalism as well as second-wave feminism.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>In addition to teaching the second half of Western Civilization and the United States survey, I have taught upper level period courses including the United States 1900-1945 and the United States since 1945 as well as topical courses in the History of Religion in America, Evangelicalism and Politics in America, and the History of Sport.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:28:17
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:40:43
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 2133
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Jennifer
    [Last_Name] => Walton-Hanley
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jennifer.walton-hanley@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor; Undergraduate Advisor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 223B
    [Phone] => (270) 745-4723
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 2009
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => African American and Race, Civil War & Reconstruction, U.S. 1750-1930, 19th-Century Britain
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>The back-to-Africa movement in a state and in a national context. Nationally, I examine the activities of the American Colonization Society in the aftermath of the Civil War, with a particular focus on the late nineteenth, early twentieth century. I am currently working on two related projects in this field: Colonization as a transnational alternative to the problems of Reconstruction and the role of women in the antebellum Kentucky colonization movement. In addition, I have a strong interest in women's and gender history and have worked extensively in these areas. I am also working on a study of a nineteenth-century Kentucky family dynamics using letters written in the 1840s between Joseph and Elizabeth Underwood. Once I have finished these projects I will be focusing my attention on Southern Women and Race at the Chicago World's Exhibition of 1893.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Teaching Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p><span>Because my major field incorporates both African American and Race history, I spend a lot of my time teaching about race relations in American history. I have taught upper-division survey courses in both halves of African American history, upper division and graduate courses in World History and colonial theory, Native American History, and American Women's history. In addition, I have taught both halves of Western Civilizations and the American history Survey courses. Finally, I have taught a variety of other courses including: The History of Africa, Civil War and Reconstruction, and my personal favorite, the History of Rock and Roll.</span></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => <p>My love of history began when I met my childhood heroes Jo March, Laura Ingalls, and Anne Shirley. All of these girls were from another time and I became fascinated with what the world was like &ldquo;back in the olden days&rdquo; as my younger self described it. My love of discovering the world of yesteryear compelled me to major in history in university where I earned a Bachelor of Arts with Honors Standing at the University of Western Ontario. Since I believed that there was still more to learn about our historical narrative I continued my education completing a Master of Arts at Central Michigan University and eventually a Doctorate in History at the University of Kentucky. As an historian I am especially fascinated at how issues of race and gender have influenced our historical experiences and have long wanted to write women and people of color back into our history books. My current research deals with black and white Kentucky women in two separate contexts: colonization and manumission and Kentucky women and the Columbia World&rsquo;s Exhibition of 1893. Both of these manuscripts will attempt to give Kentucky women a stronger presence and a louder voice in studies of Kentucky&rsquo;s past.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => thomas.gaffin
    [Added_Date] => 2011-10-20 09:37:17
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-21 12:00:56
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5551
    [Prefix] => 
    [First_Name] => Richard
    [Last_Name] => Weigel
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => richard.weigel@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor Emeritus; University Distinguished Professor
    [Office] => Cherry Hall 220D
    [Phone] => 270) 745-5724
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1973
    [Custom_Field2] => Fields
    [Custom_Value2] => Ancient Greece and Rome
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Research Interests
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span>Roman political and religious history from the Republic through the third century A.D. has been the focus of my research. I co-authored one book,&nbsp;</span><em>Peace in the Ancient World</em><span>(McFarland, 1981) and published another,&nbsp;</span><em>Lepidus: The Tarnished Triumvir</em><span>&nbsp;(Routledge, 1992). In addition, I have published roughly 30 refereed articles on topics in Roman history. The inscriptions and images on Roman coins have been one of the major sources for my published articles and for my next book, on "Gods and Goddesses on Roman Coins." I also work on a website,&nbsp;</span><em>De Imperatoribus Romanis,</em><span>&nbsp;which includes scholarly biographical entries on the Roman emperors, which can be found at:&nbsp;</span><a title="De Imperatoribus Romanis" href="http://www.roman-emperors.org/">http://www.roman-emperors.org</a><span>.</span></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Research
    [Section_Value2] => 
    [Section_Field3] => Biography
    [Section_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => marc.eagle
    [Added_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:39:02
    [Edited_By] => marc.eagle
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-16 11:40:18
    [Show_Images] => 1
)

Department of History Staff


James Baker

James Baker
- Professor Emeritus; University Distinguished Professor

William Black

William Black
- Visiting Instructor

Charles Borders

Charles Borders
- Associate Professor

Dorothea Browder

Dorothea Browder
- Associate Professor

Kate Brown

Kate Brown
- Assistant Professor

  • Email: kate.brown@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 230A
  • Fields U.S. and British Legal History, Early U.S.
Charles Bussey

Charles Bussey
- Professor Emeritus

Carol Crowe-Carraco

Carol Crowe-Carraco
- University Distinguished Professor

Robert Dietle

Robert Dietle
- Associate Professor; Interim Director, School of Journalism & Broadcasting

  • Email: robert.dietle@wku.edu
  • Office: JRH 214
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-4144
  • Fields French Revolution, European Intellectual History
Marko Dumančić

Marko Dumančić
- Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies

Marc Eagle

Marc Eagle
- Associate Professor

  • Email: marc.eagle@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 238
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-3841
  • Fields Latin America, Early Modern Spain
John Hardin

John Hardin
- Professor Emeritus

Tony Harkins

Tony Harkins
- Professor

Janet Haynes

Janet Haynes
- Office Associate

Robert Haynes

Robert Haynes
- Professor Emeritus

Dr. Audra Jennings

Dr. Audra Jennings
- Director, Office of Scholar Development; Associate Professor, Honors Academy

Eric Kondratieff

Eric Kondratieff
- Associate Professor

  • Email: eric.kondratieff@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 217
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-3841
  • Fields Greek and Roman History, Historiography and Material Culture; Ethnic Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean; Roman Epic Poetry
Glenn W. LaFantasie

Glenn W. LaFantasie
- Richard Frockt Family Professor

Marion B. Lucas

Marion B. Lucas
- Professor Emeritus; University Distinguished Professor

Dr. Andrew McMichael

Dr. Andrew McMichael
- Associate Dean, Potter College of Arts & Letters, Professor of History

Jeffrey Miner

Jeffrey Miner
- Assistant Professor

  • Email: jeffrey.miner@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 214B
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-3841
  • Fields Late Medieval Europe & Mediterranean
Patti Minter

Patti Minter
- Professor

Alexander Olson

Alexander Olson
- Assistant Professor

Eric Reed

Eric Reed
- Professor; Department Chair

Juan Romero

Juan Romero
- Associate Professor

  • Email: juan.romero@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 214A
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-3841
  • Fields Modern Middle East
Andrew Rosa

Andrew Rosa
- Associate Professor

  • Email: andrew.rosa@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 207
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-3841
  • Fields United States, African American and African Diaspora History, African American Studies
Selena Sanderfer

Selena Sanderfer
- Associate Professor

David Serafini

David Serafini
- Instructor

  • Email: david.serafini@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 224D
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-6937
  • Fields U.S., Europe, World, Military History
Richard Stone

Richard Stone
- Professor Emeritus

Richard Troutman

Richard Troutman
- Professor Emeritus

Tamara Van Dyken

Tamara Van Dyken
- Associate Professor; Undergraduate Advisor

  • Email: tamara.vandyken@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 240
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-2994
  • Fields United States Religious History, Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism, History Education
Jennifer Walton-Hanley

Jennifer Walton-Hanley
- Associate Professor; Undergraduate Advisor

  • Email: jennifer.walton-hanley@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 223B
  • Phone Number: (270) 745-4723
  • Fields African American and Race, Civil War & Reconstruction, U.S. 1750-1930, 19th-Century Britain
Richard Weigel

Richard Weigel
- Professor Emeritus; University Distinguished Professor

  • Email: richard.weigel@wku.edu
  • Office: Cherry Hall 220D
  • Phone Number: 270) 745-5724
  • Fields Ancient Greece and Rome

 


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 Last Modified 8/8/18