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PCAL Calendar


June
Wednesday, June 1st
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Thursday, June 2nd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Friday, June 3rd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

5:00pm - 7:00pm
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Join us on June 3 from 5 to 7pm to see our next exhibits, including the premiere of Nuestro hogar Kentucky, Our Kentucky Home courtesy Kentucky Arts Council and alDía en América and Casa de la Cultura Kentucky. This exhibition showcases Hispanic, Latinx and Latin American Kentuckians' visual art.
 
Also on view will be the new exhibitions, Crazy Quilt Mania, Coral Reef, Side by Side, and Ancient Near East in KY.
 
We will also celebrate our Museum for All Fund, which runs May 18 to June 17 and seeks to establish permanent free admission to the Museum.
 
Visitors will be able to enter to win door prizes, including Scavenger Hunts by Let's Roam and Adventures from Scratch. (Other prizes to be announced soon!)
 
This event is free and open to the public.
Saturday, June 4th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Sunday, June 5th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Monday, June 6th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Tuesday, June 7th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Wednesday, June 8th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

5:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: 5:00pm - 8:00pm
The Kentucky Museum will be hosting an event to see Our Kentucky, an exhibit that features Latin artists. 
 
Food & Drinks will be provided and las damas de BG will be performing! Don’t miss out great opportunity to see beautiful art by the Latin community close to our heart! 
 
El museo de KY organizará un evento para ver la exhibición que presenta a ARTISTAS latinos de KY ESTE 8 de junio de 5 a 8 p. m. Se proporcionarán alimentos y bebidas ¡Y actuarán las damas de BG! ¡No se pierda la gran oportunidad de ver el hermoso arte de la comunidad latina cerca de nuestro corazón!
All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

Thursday, June 9th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Friday, June 10th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Saturday, June 11th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Sunday, June 12th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Monday, June 13th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Tuesday, June 14th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Wednesday, June 15th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Thursday, June 16th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

Friday, June 17th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

Do you think museums should be free?

So do we. During the past three years, the Kentucky Museum has seen this point in action through the success of a three-year grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation that afforded free general admission to all visitors. In the first year, 2019, our in-person visitation grew by 45%. Despite the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020, we welcomed more than 20,000 virtual and appointment-based visitors. This past year, 2021, we reopened to the public and welcomed more than 30,000 online and in-person visitors.

Free admission means more than numbers. It provides equitable access to arts and culture for our community, where one in three families experience poverty. Yet, as much as we would love to, we cannot provide continued free admission without replacing the revenue that admission fees generate. This revenue is integral to our mission, since all our exhibits and programs are supported by donors like you.

This year, we are establishing the Kentucky Museum for All Fund – an endowment to provide sustainable funding while supporting diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility throughout the Museum.

You are key to this endeavor. Will you make a gift to support the Museum for All fund?

Click here to make a gift.

Saturday, June 18th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Sunday, June 19th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Monday, June 20th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Tuesday, June 21st
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Wednesday, June 22nd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Thursday, June 23rd
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Friday, June 24th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Saturday, June 25th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Sunday, June 26th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Monday, June 27th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Tuesday, June 28th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Wednesday, June 29th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

Thursday, June 30th
All Day
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit tells the stories of freshmen year from participants in a student success intiative, WKU Freshmen Guided Pathway (FGP). This cohort of first-time, full-time students who graduated from one of five high schools in Warren County represent the typical WKU freshman in terms of academic achievement prior to admission and their demographic makeup.

FGP assists students as they negotiate the often difficult affective and academic shifts between high school and college. Learn more about the program in this exhibit, presented by the Kelly M. Burch Institute for Transformative Practices in Higher Education, Office of Strategic Communications and Marketing, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the WKU Center for Literacy, and the Kentucky Museum.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

Gazing Deeply showcases how WKU’s backyard—the unique landscape of Mammoth Cave—is being studied, interpreted, and inspiring action on environmental change. Coinciding with the UNESCO Conservation of Fragile Karst Resources: A Workshop on Sustainability and Community and Earth Day’s 50th anniversary in 2020, this exhibition is a collaborative effort between arts and science faculty and students that highlights one of the most well-known and vital natural landscapes in the world. 

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

History suggests that as “big business” started to take hold in the late 1800s, women became more involved in business and working outside the home. However, few women owned companies. Those that did were in industries centered on women, such as home goods, apparel, or personal care.

Today, women own only 40% of businesses in the U.S., making Carrie Burnam Taylor’s business of the early 20th century that much more impressive. Curated with Dr. Carrie Cox, this exhibit will explore Taylor's life and work, displaying three of her dresses, two coats, two bodices, and various undergarments recently conserved thanks to our Adopt-an-Artifact program.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

This exhibit primarily focuses on the role of writing in two early urban societies, Mesopotamia and Egypt. The artifacts are roughly 4,300 to 3,000 years old. In the 19th century, museums and libraries throughout the Western world acquired cultural artifacts from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, often from a desire to connect with what they considered the origins of Western civilization or Biblical History.

More Information

All Day
  • Location: Kentucky Museum
  • Time: All Day

In the late 1800s, stitchery from London's Royal School of Art needlework and Japanese arts and crafts exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition inspired women across America to take up their needles in new and different ways. Explore the various "maniacal" and "maddening" designs that resulted in this showcase of our Crazy Quilt collection.

All Day
  • Time: All Day

The Topper Orientation Program allows students and families to connect with the WKU campus and community. We provide information sessions with current students, academic advising, and class registration in a welcoming atmosphere during orientation. We are excited you are officially joining the Hilltopper family!

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