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Blog

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    [0] => Array
        (
            [title] => Planning in Uncertain Times
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/planning-in-uncertain-times/
            [comments] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/planning-in-uncertain-times/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-28
            [date] => 2020-05-28
            [description] => The year 1946 marked the beginning of the “baby boom,” a dramatic increase in the U.S. birth rate following the Depression and World War II.  Signs of what was to come, however, had appeared at the outbreak of war, when … Continue reading 
            [summary] => The year 1946 marked the beginning of the “baby boom,” a dramatic increase in the U.S. birth rate following the Depression and World War II.  Signs of what was to come, however, had appeared at the outbreak of war, when … Continue reading 
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        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [title] => In search of a cure
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/in-search-of-a-cure/
            [comments] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/in-search-of-a-cure/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-22
            [date] => 2020-05-22
            [description] => When her late husband, astronaut John Glenn, became the first American to orbit the earth, Anna Margaret “Annie” Glenn, who lost her life to coronavirus on May 19, was herself rocketed into the public spotlight.  She found her new celebrity … Continue reading 
            [summary] => When her late husband, astronaut John Glenn, became the first American to orbit the earth, Anna Margaret “Annie” Glenn, who lost her life to coronavirus on May 19, was herself rocketed into the public spotlight.  She found her new celebrity … Continue reading 
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        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [title] => “A Great House of Mourning”
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/a-great-house-of-mourning/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-15
            [date] => 2020-05-15
            [description] => We’ve blogged in the past about Kentuckians’ varied reactions to epidemics of disease.  In 1833, cholera’s assault on Federal Hill in Bardstown left permanent scars on the surviving members of the Rowan family. During an outbreak in Bowling Green in … Continue reading 
            [summary] => We’ve blogged in the past about Kentuckians’ varied reactions to epidemics of disease.  In 1833, cholera’s assault on Federal Hill in Bardstown left permanent scars on the surviving members of the Rowan family. During an outbreak in Bowling Green in … Continue reading 
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            [wp_big_image] => 
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [title] => “One entire description of suffering”
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/one-entire-description-of-suffering/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-07
            [date] => 2020-05-07
            [description] => With our prospects of travel currently unappealing and not likely to improve soon, we can at least hope that we will not return to past discomforts of wagons, coaches, and explosively coal-fired locomotives and steamboats.  One such 19th-century travel nightmare … Continue reading 
            [summary] => With our prospects of travel currently unappealing and not likely to improve soon, we can at least hope that we will not return to past discomforts of wagons, coaches, and explosively coal-fired locomotives and steamboats.  One such 19th-century travel nightmare … Continue reading 
            [wp_image] => 
            [wp_big_image] => 
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [title] => Slowing the Spread
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/slowing-the-spread/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-29
            [date] => 2020-04-29
            [description] => As we know, accompanying the usual physical sufferings from an outbreak of infectious disease are fear and uncertainty, rumors and half-truths, and a search for scapegoats.  Such was the case when the 119th U.S. Colored Infantry set up camp near … Continue reading 
            [summary] => As we know, accompanying the usual physical sufferings from an outbreak of infectious disease are fear and uncertainty, rumors and half-truths, and a search for scapegoats.  Such was the case when the 119th U.S. Colored Infantry set up camp near … Continue reading 
            [wp_image] => 
            [wp_big_image] => 
        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [title] => Of Books and Boondoggles
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/of-books-and-boondoggles/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-22
            [date] => 2020-04-22
            [description] => It was an impressive publication, not just in its ponderous title but in the amount of space it occupied on the shelf of the discriminating doctor, lawyer or businessman.  In 1909, Philip J. Noel, Sr. of Bowling Green, Kentucky purchased … Continue reading 
            [summary] => It was an impressive publication, not just in its ponderous title but in the amount of space it occupied on the shelf of the discriminating doctor, lawyer or businessman.  In 1909, Philip J. Noel, Sr. of Bowling Green, Kentucky purchased … Continue reading 
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        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [title] => “Just retribution! but how awful!”
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/just-retribution-but-how-awful/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-15
            [date] => 2020-04-15
            [description] => “Horrible!” wrote Sallie Knott on April 15, 1865.  The previous evening in Washington, D.C, President Abraham Lincoln had been shot at Ford’s Theater and Secretary of State William H. Seward stabbed by unknown assailants.  At home in Lebanon, Kentucky, Sallie … Continue reading 
            [summary] => “Horrible!” wrote Sallie Knott on April 15, 1865.  The previous evening in Washington, D.C, President Abraham Lincoln had been shot at Ford’s Theater and Secretary of State William H. Seward stabbed by unknown assailants.  At home in Lebanon, Kentucky, Sallie … Continue reading 
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        )

    [7] => Array
        (
            [title] => “The willow behind his wallop”
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/the-willow-behind-his-wallop/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-06
            [date] => 2020-04-06
            [description] => On April 6, 1942, some 2,500 spectators gathered at the Bowling Green Fairgrounds to watch an exhibition major league baseball game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Boston Red Sox.  The contest was part of their three-city swing through Kentucky … Continue reading 
            [summary] => On April 6, 1942, some 2,500 spectators gathered at the Bowling Green Fairgrounds to watch an exhibition major league baseball game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Boston Red Sox.  The contest was part of their three-city swing through Kentucky … Continue reading 
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        )

    [8] => Array
        (
            [title] => The Jump Ball
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/03/the-jump-ball/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-03-29
            [date] => 2020-03-29
            [description] => With March Madness now becalmed, here’s some Hilltopper basketball history to keep the pulse racing: It was March 11, 1966. The Ohio Valley Conference Champion Hilltoppers entered the NCAA tournament with a 23-2 record and a stellar lineup that included … Continue reading 
            [summary] => With March Madness now becalmed, here’s some Hilltopper basketball history to keep the pulse racing: It was March 11, 1966. The Ohio Valley Conference Champion Hilltoppers entered the NCAA tournament with a 23-2 record and a stellar lineup that included … Continue reading 
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        )

    [9] => Array
        (
            [title] => Women strike a chord
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/03/women-strike-a-chord/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-03-12
            [date] => 2020-03-12
            [description] => On the morning of March 12, 1925, a bit of musical (and women’s) history was made on the Hill when a new tune rang out at chapel assembly.  The song College Heights was the winner of a competition between members … Continue reading 
            [summary] => On the morning of March 12, 1925, a bit of musical (and women’s) history was made on the Hill when a new tune rang out at chapel assembly.  The song College Heights was the winner of a competition between members … Continue reading 
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        )

)

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 Last Modified 5/27/20