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Blog

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    [0] => Array
        (
            [title] => “A rich morsel to roll under their tongues”
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/09/a-rich-morsel-to-roll-under-their-tongues/
            [comments] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/09/a-rich-morsel-to-roll-under-their-tongues/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-09-14
            [date] => 2020-09-14
            [description] => Like many young couples in the 19th century, they courted through their letters.  After they met early in 1880, Nellie Gates, 24, of Calhoun, Kentucky and Robert Coleman “Coley” Duncan, 26, began a correspondence.  Their face-to-face time was limited, as … Continue reading 
            [summary] => Like many young couples in the 19th century, they courted through their letters.  After they met early in 1880, Nellie Gates, 24, of Calhoun, Kentucky and Robert Coleman “Coley” Duncan, 26, began a correspondence.  Their face-to-face time was limited, as … Continue reading 
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        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [title] => Let Us Serenade You
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/08/let-us-serenade-you/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-08-31
            [date] => 2020-08-31
            [description] => They were late-night, improvised musical events that captured the romantic imaginations of nineteenth-century students, particularly those at Southern women’s colleges.  At Bowling Green’s Potter College for Young Ladies (located where WKU’s Cherry Hall now stands), these “midnight serenades,” courtesy of … Continue reading 
            [summary] => They were late-night, improvised musical events that captured the romantic imaginations of nineteenth-century students, particularly those at Southern women’s colleges.  At Bowling Green’s Potter College for Young Ladies (located where WKU’s Cherry Hall now stands), these “midnight serenades,” courtesy of … Continue reading 
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        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [title] => Ambitious Women and Postmasters
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/08/ambitious-women-and-postmasters/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-08-17
            [date] => 2020-08-17
            [description] => In summer 1913, life was becoming intolerable for Nannie England.  The 35-year-old Bardstown native had lost her husband Alfred to tuberculosis two years earlier, her 11-year-old son Edward had just been accidentally killed in a dynamite explosion, and the mortgage … Continue reading 
            [summary] => In summer 1913, life was becoming intolerable for Nannie England.  The 35-year-old Bardstown native had lost her husband Alfred to tuberculosis two years earlier, her 11-year-old son Edward had just been accidentally killed in a dynamite explosion, and the mortgage … Continue reading 
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        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [title] => Closings and Reopenings
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/07/closings-and-reopenings/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-07-31
            [date] => 2020-07-31
            [description] => His letter written 158 years ago today showed the 22-year-old negotiating life in fits and starts.  After graduating from New York’s Hamilton College in 1859, Hector Voltaire Loving had returned to his home town of Bowling Green, Kentucky.  For the … Continue reading 
            [summary] => His letter written 158 years ago today showed the 22-year-old negotiating life in fits and starts.  After graduating from New York’s Hamilton College in 1859, Hector Voltaire Loving had returned to his home town of Bowling Green, Kentucky.  For the … Continue reading 
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        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [title] => Teacher’s Watch
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/07/teachers-watch/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-07-14
            [date] => 2020-07-14
            [description] => It was just after 10 o’clock on a July evening in 1899 when Roland Patterson started a letter to his parents.  He sketched a peaceful picture.  He was seated in a large rocking chair, with a “sweet quiet pervading the … Continue reading 
            [summary] => It was just after 10 o’clock on a July evening in 1899 when Roland Patterson started a letter to his parents.  He sketched a peaceful picture.  He was seated in a large rocking chair, with a “sweet quiet pervading the … Continue reading 
            [wp_image] => 
            [wp_big_image] => 
        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [title] => Taking Advantage of the Fact
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/06/taking-advantage-of-the-fact/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-06-19
            [date] => 2020-06-19
            [description] => The Juneteenth celebration has its origins in the announcement delivered on June 19, 1865 by Union troops at Galveston, Texas, that “all slaves are free.”  The Confederacy’s surrender the previous April had finally put the U.S. Army in a position … Continue reading 
            [summary] => The Juneteenth celebration has its origins in the announcement delivered on June 19, 1865 by Union troops at Galveston, Texas, that “all slaves are free.”  The Confederacy’s surrender the previous April had finally put the U.S. Army in a position … Continue reading 
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        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [title] => History from Home
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/06/history-from-home/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-06-05
            [date] => 2020-06-05
            [description] => Everyone knew something big was coming – just not when or where – but on D-Day, June 6, 1944, the mystery was solved.  As soon as she heard the news that morning in Calhoun, Kentucky, David Ellen Tichenor penned a … Continue reading 
            [summary] => Everyone knew something big was coming – just not when or where – but on D-Day, June 6, 1944, the mystery was solved.  As soon as she heard the news that morning in Calhoun, Kentucky, David Ellen Tichenor penned a … Continue reading 
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        )

    [7] => Array
        (
            [title] => Planning in Uncertain Times
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/planning-in-uncertain-times/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-28
            [date] => 2020-05-28
            [description] => The year 1946 marked the beginning of the “baby boom,” a dramatic increase in the U.S. birth rate following the Depression and World War II.  Signs of what was to come, however, had appeared at the outbreak of war, when … Continue reading 
            [summary] => The year 1946 marked the beginning of the “baby boom,” a dramatic increase in the U.S. birth rate following the Depression and World War II.  Signs of what was to come, however, had appeared at the outbreak of war, when … Continue reading 
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        )

    [8] => Array
        (
            [title] => In search of a cure
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/in-search-of-a-cure/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-22
            [date] => 2020-05-22
            [description] => When her late husband, astronaut John Glenn, became the first American to orbit the earth, Anna Margaret “Annie” Glenn, who lost her life to coronavirus on May 19, was herself rocketed into the public spotlight.  She found her new celebrity … Continue reading 
            [summary] => When her late husband, astronaut John Glenn, became the first American to orbit the earth, Anna Margaret “Annie” Glenn, who lost her life to coronavirus on May 19, was herself rocketed into the public spotlight.  She found her new celebrity … Continue reading 
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        )

    [9] => Array
        (
            [title] => “A Great House of Mourning”
            [link] => https://library.blog.wku.edu/2020/05/a-great-house-of-mourning/
            [comments] => 
            [pubDate] => 2020-05-15
            [date] => 2020-05-15
            [description] => We’ve blogged in the past about Kentuckians’ varied reactions to epidemics of disease.  In 1833, cholera’s assault on Federal Hill in Bardstown left permanent scars on the surviving members of the Rowan family. During an outbreak in Bowling Green in … Continue reading 
            [summary] => We’ve blogged in the past about Kentuckians’ varied reactions to epidemics of disease.  In 1833, cholera’s assault on Federal Hill in Bardstown left permanent scars on the surviving members of the Rowan family. During an outbreak in Bowling Green in … Continue reading 
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        )

)

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 Last Modified 8/21/20