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Health Sciences Curriculum


The Health Sciences major consists of 62-68 semester hours. 38-41 semester hours are required core classes that each Health Sciences student will complete. The other 24-27 semester hours are course students will take within their specific Health Sciences concentration.  Below you will find the list of the required core classes and course descriptions for the Health Sciences major. 


HMD 211. HUMAN NUTRITION

Prerequisite: 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status. Study of nutrients essential to human life and well-being. Nutrients are studied relative to their function in metabolism, sources in food, and relationship to health. 


AH 290. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY or HIM 290. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

A course designed to acquaint the student with the specialized language of medicine and to develop communication skills in areas where use of medical terms is necessary and appropriate. 


PH 381. COMMUNITY HEALTH

Prerequisites: PH 261 or appropriate background. Study of international, national, state and local health problems, and the governmental, voluntary and private sectors of the health care system. Emphasis is placed upon preventative strategies appropriate for contemporary public health concerns. 


PH 384. INTRO TO EPIDEMIOLOGY

Prerequisites: PH 383. Explores the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, illnesses, injuries, disability, and death in populations. Examines the application of epidemiologic procedures to the understanding of the occurrence and control of conditions such as infectious and chronic diseases, mental diseases, mental disorders, community and environmental health hazards, accidents, and geriatric problems.


HCA 340. HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION & MANAGEMENT

Examines historic, social, political, and economic factors that shape the U.S. health care delivery system. Topics include the components of the healthcare delivery system such as medical office practices, hospitals, and long-term healthcare systems. Included are financial and non-financial resources found in the U.S., concepts of public health, quality of care and outcomes measurement, and strategies for improving access to care. The role of health care administration as critical to the system will be stressed.

Select one of following Psychology courses to complete: 


PSY/S 100. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

An introductory course dealing with principles of behavior, scientific methods of psychology, measurement, learning, perception, motivation, development, personality, abnormal behavior, social behavior, intelligence, and other topics.


PSY/S 220 INTRODUCTION TO LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

A general course in developmental psychology covering the entire life span. Included are a description of growth stages, theories of development, and research methods of development.

Select one of following Biology courses to complete: 


BIOL 113. GENERAL BIOLOGY

An introductory course in biology for the non-science major, which emphasizes the diversity and organization of life integrated with major principles and new discoveries


BIOL 120. BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: CELLS METABOLISM AND GENETICS

Corequisite: BIOL 121. Introductory course in biology that emphasizes cellular organization and processes, metabolism, DNA structure and replication, and Mendelian and population genetics.

BIOL 121. BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS: CELLS, METABOLISM, AND GENETICS LAB.

Corequisite: BIOL 120. Introductory laboratory in biology that emphasizes the experimental aspects of cellular organization and processes, metabolism, DNA structure and replication, and Mendelian and population genetics.


BIOL 131. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

 A basic anatomy and physiology course designed for students in physical education and health science careers. Emphasis is placed upon the concept of homeostasis and relationship of structure and function. 

Select one of following Chemistry or Physics courses to complete: 


CHEM 105. FUNDAMENTALS OF GENERAL CHEMISTRY

Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or DMA 096C. Corequisite:CHEM 106. The first half of a one-year course predominantly for majors in agriculture and consumer and family sciences, and for non-science majors desiring a full year sequence in chemistry. It does not count toward a major or a minor in chemistry.

CHEM 106. FUNDAMENTALS OF GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Corequisite:CHEM 105. Laboratory to accompany CHEM 105. Pre-lab lecture and laboratory meet two and one-half hours per week.


CHEM 109. CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES

A course designed to emphasize the practical aspects on inorganic, organic and biochemistry as related to human health. The course is offered specifically for students in the allied health programs, but is also recommended for students in physical education, recreation, health and safety and other disciplines dealing with human health. It does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry, but does satisfy general education requirement. No laboratory accompanies this course, but CHEM 102 is recommended for students desiring laboratory experience.


CHEM 116. INTRO TO COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 

Prerequisite(s): MATH 116 or higher. A one-semester course for students desiring a general survey of chemistry with a mathematical emphasis. An introductory course for College Chemistry students whose ACT score in mathematics would indicate marginal success in CHEM 120. Does not count toward a major/minor in chemistry nor does it satisfy the requirements for certain consumer and family science or agriculture majors. CHEM 106 laboratory is optional.


PHYSICS ***

Select one of following Physical Education courses to complete:


PE 310. KINESIOLOGY

Study of the anatomical, mechanical, and neuromuscular bases of human movement.


PE 311. EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 

A study of the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the body’s physiological function.


PE 313. MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

A study of the development of human motor performance


PH 390. WELLNESS/FITNESS ASSESS

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 131, HMD 211, CPR certification and junior standing. Techniques of wellness and fitness assessment, evaluations of various populations including identification of individual health risk factors, and personal goals for cardiovascular health and fitness.

Select one of following Statistics courses to complete: 


MATH 183. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on Math ACT and MPE, or COMPASS or KYOTE; or DMA 096C with a grade of “C” or better. Introduction to elementary probability theory. The analysis of data by means of frequency distributions and the statistics which describe them. The binomial and normal probability distributions. Statistical inference. Emphasis is on applied real world problems. Not accepted for credit toward a mathematics major or minor.


PH 383. BIOSTATISTICS/ HEALTH SCIENCE

Prerequisites: Math 109 or Math 116 or higher. Introduction to statistical methods, scientific structure of study design, hypothesis formation and verification and study classification. Includes descriptive statistics, data presentation, data sources, questionnaire construction, interviewing techniques and use of computer technology.


SOCL 300. USING STATISTICS IN SOCIOLOGY

Prerequisite: MATH 109 or 116 or MATH 183 or equivalent. Techniques of statistical description and elementary statistical inference as applied to social data


BIOL 382. INTRODUCTORY BIOSTATISTICS

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 /121 and BIOL 122 / 123 with grades of “C” or higher or consent of instructor; MATH 117 (or equivalent or higher). Introduction to statistical techniques and experimental design applied to the biological sciences. Probability and distributions, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing and statistical inference using t-statistics, regression, ANOVA, chi-square, non-parametric tests. Use of computers and analysis of real data are emphasized.


STAT 301. INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY AND APPLIED STATISTICS

Prerequisite: MATH 136 or MATH 142 with a grade of “C” or higher. A calculus based introduction to applied statistics, with emphasis on analysis of real data. Curve fitting, probability models, estimation and testing for means and proportions, quality control; use of computers for data analysis and simulation.


PSY/S 313. STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Prerequisites: PSYS 210 and 211 with a grade of “C” or better. Methods of organizing, describing, and analyzing psychological data. 

Select one of following Ethics courses to complete:


LEAD 330. LEAD ETHICS/DECISION-MAKING

Prerequisite(s): LEAD 200 or LEAD 300, or instructor's permission.Study of contemporary ethical and decision-making issues facing leaders; emphasis on examining and analyzing ethical issues for sound leadership solutions.


PH 447. HEALTH VALUES/HEALTH SCIENCE

Prerequisites: PH 261, PH 381, or appropriate background in the social behavioral, biological, or allied health sciences. An analysis of the difficult ethical, legal, and social dilemmas confronting the health care delivery system, patients, medical practitioners and other health care professionals in contemporary American society


PHIL 322. BIOMEDICAL ETHICS

A philosophical analysis of ethical problems in biomedical practice and research, including patients’ rights, professional responsibilities, death and dying, health care allocation, and reproductive technologies.


PHIL 323. SOCIAL ETHICS

Prerequisite: One course in Religious Studies or Philosophy or junior status. Perspectives and issues involved in the public pursuit of justice in a religiously and philosophically diverse society. One short field trip.


MGT 305. ETHICS AND CRITICAL THINKING

Prerequisites: MGT 200 and junior standing. This course is designed to develop skills needed for analyzing a problem or situation to arrive at a hypothesis or conclusion about it after synthesizing or integrating all available information. In critical thinking, all assumptions are open to question, divergent views are sought, and the investigation is not biased in favor of a particular solution. 


SWRK 433. ETHICAL ISSUES AND DILEMMAS IN SOCIAL WORK

Prerequisites: SWRK 101 and SWRK 205, or permission of the instructor. An examination of professional ethics and common ethical dilemmas in social work. Models of ethical decision making are applied in case vignettes.

Select one of following Legal courses to complete:


HCA 441. LEGAL ASPECTS/HEALTH CARE

Prerequisites: HCA 340 or permission of instructor. This course will examine the relationship between the health care system in the United States and the legal system. The component parts of the legal system, including the legislative, administrative and judicial functions will be reviewed. Current trends in the area of health care law will be studied.


HIM 225. LEGAL ISSUES IN HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Advanced course relating concepts and principles of law, the health record as a legal document, confidential communication, consents and authorization, release of information and current trends in health legislation.


MGT 200 / MGMT 200C. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. An introduction to the American public law system; use of law to achieve economic and social goals; legal responsibilities of the business manager.


MGT 301. BUSINESS LAW

Prerequisite: Junior standing. A basic course in commercial law covering contracts, property, creditor rights, torts and other bases for liability and the Uniform Commercial Code. 

Select one of following Computer Informatics courses to complete:


HCA 446. HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS

Prerequisites: HCA 340 Consideration of the vital role played by the exchange of organizational information in support of clinical care and management decision making in today's health care environment.

HCA 447. INFORMATION SYSTEMS LAB

 Co-requisite: HCA 446 or equivalent. This course includes hands-on instruction in computer hardware, operating systems, and database architecture. Basic familiarity with personal computers is assumed.


CIS 243. PRINCIPLES OF MIS

Prerequisite: CIS 141 or CSCI 145C. The basis of information systems and how they fit into a decision-making environment. An introduction to systems analysis in relation to managing information systems. Strategic uses of information technology throughout the business enterprise.


CIS 321. EMERGING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES

Prerequisite: CIS 141 or CSCI 145C. Overview of the most recent tools and techniques in information technology, and their utilization in the business environment. 

 


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 Last Modified 1/8/19