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WKU in the News


Here is a selection of recent news stories about WKU:

Nov. 12-23, 2021

Daily News 

WKU Public Radio 

Spectrum News 1 

WBKO-TV 

WNKY-TV 

  • Emerging Leader – Tribhuwan Singh: This week’s Emerging Leader is Tribhuwan Singh, a Finance and Business Analytics double-major at Western Kentucky University. 
  • WKU geologist wins China’s highest award given to foreign experts: China’s Ministry of Science and Technology has announced that University Distinguished Professor of Hydrogeology Chris Groves of Western Kentucky University’s Department of Earth, Environmental, and Atmospheric Sciences has won the Chinese Government Friendship Award, which is the People’s Republic of China’s highest award for “foreign experts who have made outstanding contributions to the country’s economic and social progress.” 
  • Glasgow teacher inducted into the Kentucky Teacher’s Hall of Fame: Western Kentucky University is the home of the Kentucky Teachers Hall of Fame. Friday, four new members were added to that distinguished list. 
  • Feel Good Friday – Olivia Miller: WKU sophomore Olivia Miller battled a life threatening medical condition in her early years. Now, she’s living her best life, and has been inspired to study healthcare so she can save others as well. 
  • Gov. Beshear visits WKU SmartHolstein Lab: Thursday evening Gov. Andy Beshear was at Western Kentucky University visiting the SmartHolstein Lab. 
  • Pets impact emotional and physical health: WKU psychology professor Rick Grieve said pets can help people struggling with mental health issues. 
  • Emerging Leader – Abi Canter: Abi Canter is a senior at Western Kentucky University, the Chapter President of Alpha Delta Pi, and serves with a variety of other organizations on the Hill. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Crawford provides analysis, mentorship: Although he is only 22, Brady Crawford of Elizabethtown already is making great strides in professional development and is serving as a mentor to those on similar paths. An Elizabethtown native and 2017 graduate of Elizabethtown High School, Crawford went on to earn an associate’s degree from Elizabethtown Community and Technical College and earned a bachelor’s degree in business data analytics from Western Kentucky University in 2020. 
  • Burba looks forward to a career in helping others: Maddy Burba is studying nursing in high school to help in her future career. A Central Hardin High School, Burba, 18, is in the health science pathway at the Early College and Career Center currently in a phlebotomy class and she received her CNA certification last year. She’s planning to go to Western Kentucky University for nursing school. 

Lexington Herald-Leader 

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association 

Oct. 26-Nov. 11, 2021

WKU Public Radio 

Spectrum News 1 

  • Longtime artists prepare for the return of the World’s Greatest Studio Tour: Longtime artist like Terry Wilson are preparing for the return of the The World's Greatest Studio tour after a year off. Wilson now retired, previously worked for Western Kentucky University as a professor. He now is in his seventh year painting and after a year off due to COVID-19 is excited about the return. 

Daily News 

  • Kentucky Museum’s ‘Christmas in Kentucky’ set to return: After last year’s event was canceled due to COVID-19, Western Kentucky University’s Kentucky Museum will host its 15th Christmas in Kentucky celebration free for the public next month. 
  • WKU's enrollment dips again this fall amid pandemic: Western Kentucky University’s enrollment for full-time equivalent students is down again this year, signaling that – despite the university’s best efforts to recruit students – it isn’t exempt from a national decline in college enrollment that’s been turbocharged by the pandemic. 
  • WKU making strides with LGBTQ inclusion: Through a campuswide effort, Western Kentucky University has gone up on the national Campus Pride Index with a new official rating of 4.5 stars out of 5, the university announced Wednesday. 
  • WKU marks passing of ardent donor, Pete Mahurin: Pete Mahurin – a longtime supporter of Western Kentucky University, champion of gifted education and a namesake of the university’s Honors College – died Wednesday. He was 83. 
  • WKU showcases adaptive athletics offerings: Western Kentucky University student Drew Brumfield got a fresh perspective on a classic sport Sunday as he participated in an adaptive athletics showcase at the campus’ Preston Center. 

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU is working to prepare students for careers: Western Kentucky University Gordon Ford College of Business is working with students this week to prepare them for life after graduation. 
  • Hidden Heroes – Jace Lux: Jace Lux has been at Western Kentucky University for two decades. First as a student, then as an educator and now as a leader. He’s this week’s Hidden Hero. 
  • Emerging Leader – Blake Barker: Blake Barker is a senior at Western Kentucky University who started a mentorship program with his friends to encourage bridging the gap between freshmen and upperclassmen, as the new students transition to life on the Hill. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Hartford native's cancer bout inspires nursing dreams: Olivia Miller, a Hartford native and soon-to-be nursing student at WKU, hopes to inspire hope in others with her cancer survival journey. Miller, a sophomore at WKU, said she will be starting in the school’s nursing program next semester, which has been a dream of hers for some time. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Miss Kentucky visits includes talk of goal setting: Wheeler graduated with her master’s degree in speech pathology in May from Western Kentucky University, a major that she was inspired to study because of her great-grandfather’s illness. 
  • Cubbage displays compassion for children through CASA role: Through her role with CASA of the Heartland, Natalie Cubbage of Leitchfield has made it a full-time mission to help at-risk children in the community. A 2010 graduate of Grayson County High School, Cubbage earned her bachelor’s degree in social work in 2014 from Western Kentucky University. 
  • Realtor recognized for 50 years in industry: Marilyn McLane has been in the real estate business for 50 years and was recognized for the feat Monday during the Heart of Kentucky Association of Realtors’ luncheon held at American Legion Hardin Post 113 in Elizabethtown. Marilyn and her husband, Hardin McLane, together have accrued a total of 112 years in the real estate business. The two, who have been married 62 years, met while attending Western Kentucky University. 

WBKR-FM, Owensboro 

Think Advisor 

  • Social Media Star Kyla Scanlon Is Making Finance Fun: Kyla Scanlon, 24, is determined to reshape financial education. The innovative, entertaining content creator, who began trading options at age 16, has a platform in the works she describes as “a financial playground.”. From Kentucky, she was schooled in gifted classes and at Western Kentucky University majored in finance, economics and data analytics. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 2019. 

Paintsville Herald 

  • Paintsville Tourism welcomes new director: As a person with a lifelong love for Eastern Kentucky, new Paintsville Tourism Executive Director Chesi Arnett said she has spent most of her adult life following the path of education for the sake of pursuing this exact position, which she called her “dream job,” adding that she wanted to share her love of Johnson County and Paintsville with the world. “So, I went to Western Kentucky University and I double majored in Communications and Tourism, and my whole goal was to one day be Paintsville Tourism director,” Arnett said. 

WalletHub

  • What makes a good sports city?: This is a tough question, and it will really depend on the person you are talking to. For me, what makes a good sports city is having a dedicated fan base that will support the team through good and bad times. – Dr. W. Andrew Czekanski, Assistant Professor, WKU’s School of Kinesiology, Recreation & Sport

Oct. 9-25, 2021

Daily News 

Spectrum News 1 

WBKO-TV 

WNKY-TV 

National Geographic 

  • Why animals developed four types of skeletons: Flying fish are known for their spectacular acrobatics, bursting through the ocean’s surface and sailing in the air as long as 3,000 feet. Why fly? To avoid predators. They’re “basically marine popcorn,” says Steve Huskey, a biologist at Western Kentucky University and author of The Skeleton Revealed. "Everybody eats them.” 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Storey fulfills dreams of entrepreneurship: Throughout her life, Lisa Storey of Vine Grove has held many different roles, including positions in the fields of health care and education. Now, she is primarily focused on entrepreneurship, a pursuit she has almost always been interested in. She  holds a bachelor’s degree in biology with an emphasis on pre-medicine from Western Kentucky University and later went on to earn a master’s degree in middle grade education from WKU. 

WEHT-TV, Evansville/Henderson 

Mountain Advocate, Barbourville 

  • Clouse to be formally inducted in to hall of fame: Wanda Carol Clouse, 2020 Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame inductee will be formally inducted on November 19 along with this year’s honorees. Last year’s ceremony was not held due to Covid-19. The ceremony will take place on the campus of Western Kentucky University. 

WCLU-FM, Glasgow 

Wallet Hub

  • Guaranteed Approval Credit Cards: Is it possible for a credit card to truly guarantee approval? Generally speaking “Guaranteed Approval” should be interpreted as minimal requirements necessary for approval. -- Jonathan Handy, Assistant Professor, WKU

Oct. 2-8, 2021

Spectrum News 1 

WKU Public Radio 

WBKO-TV 

  • First Augmented Reality Gallery at WKU: The first Augmented Reality Gallery on Western Kentucky University’s campus is at the Fine Arts Center from October 3 through October 9. 
  • National Coffee with a Cop Day at WKU: The Western Kentucky Police Department celebrates National Coffee with a Cop Day by going to the on-campus Starbucks to share a ‘cup of joe’ with students.

WNKY-TV 

  • Local entrepreneurs share success stories in spite of pandemic: Since the start of the pandemic, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center says they’ve had many new people asking to be mentored about how to start up a business. At Western Kentucky University’s Research and Development Center, one entrepreneur’s business was turned to dust overnight during the pandemic. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Louisville Courier Journal 

  • Tour 17 Kentucky locations that inspired filmmaker John Carpenter as he wrote 'Halloween': It's been more than 40 years since one of the most iconic horror movies ever made hit movie theaters. "Halloween" scared the bejeebers out of teenage babysitters and went on to launch a pretty cool driving tour in Bowling Green, Kentucky. You can add an element of realism to your Halloween season with a day trip to Bowling Green to see the place that inspired famed filmmaker John Carpenter as he wrote his scary movie franchise. 

Louisville Business Journal 

Murfreesboro (TN) Post 

  • Olt joins farm credit office: Amy Olt has been hired as a financial officer for the Farm Credit Mid-America office in Murfreesboro. Olt, a Greenburg, Ky., native, earned a bachelor’s degree in agriculture education and a master’s degree in animal science and agriculture education from Western Kentucky University. 

Lewiston (ID) Tribune 

  • From field to feast: Jed Conklin, a freelance photographer, real estate entrepreneur and restaurant owner recently of Spokane, doesn’t recall a time when he wasn’t a hunter or angler. In college Conklin was known as a sort of provider who would share his deer, ducks and other game with fellow journalism students and his instructors at Western Kentucky University. 

Sept. 21-Oct. 1, 2021

Daily News 

  • $1.4M grant will support WKU's outreach to adult learners: A $1.4 million grant awarded to Western Kentucky University will support 1,000 adult learners throughout the region as they navigate their higher education journey. 
  • WKU cuts ribbon on new program for adults with autism: Former Western Kentucky University President Gary Ransdell and his wife, Julie, shared an earnest moment of gratitude Thursday when they celebrated the opening of the new Julie and Gary Ransdell Living and Learning Community at LifeWorks – a WKU program for adults with autism. 
  • WKU professor tackles alleged media bias in new book: What drives the perception among many U.S. political conservatives that the news media largely skew left? It’s a thorny question that Rich Shumate, a professor in Western Kentucky University’s School of Media, aims to unravel in his new book, “Barry Goldwater, Distrust in Media, and Conservative Identity: The Perception of Liberal Bias in the News,” published by Lexington Books. 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

  • WKU Police follow leads in several bike thefts: WKU students are back on campus, but studying and getting to class are not the only things they have to worry about. WKU has also seen an increase in bike thefts. 
  • WKU students fill-in as long term substitute teachers amid pandemic: Last month, the Kentucky Educational Standards Board approved a waiver to allow education majors who are eligible to serve as long-term substitute teachers, or emergency substitute teachers in place of their student teaching requirement. Rockfield Elementary currently has three WKU students serving as long-term substitute teachers in various departments.
  • WKU and BGPR partner to start adaptive sports program: Bowling Green Parks and Recreation is teaming up with Western Kentucky University to bring an adaptive sports program to the hill. BGPR and WKU graduate student Cameron Levis came up with the idea to give students with disabilities the opportunity to play sports. 

Cherokee Phoenix, Tahlequah, OK 

  • Meyer-Thornton selected as Native American Journalists Association Fellow: After his selection as a Native American Journalists Association Fellow, a Cherokee Nation citizen is putting together his associated project and looking forward to a career that includes coverage of Native issues and subjects. Zane Meyer-Thornton, a Western Kentucky University student, was one of six chosen by NAJA for its 2021 Native American Journalism Fellowship who are working in their respective projects during the fall term under mentors. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • OPS 'growing" seven teachers from current employees: Owensboro Public Schools is moving forward with growing its own teachers from current employees. Now, thanks to two grants, it will be able to help fund all seven applicants of the first Grow Your Own class. Scholarships for two of the employees will be provided by the Hager Foundation and the Marilyn and William Young Foundation. The scholarships will fund half of the program’s total cost, and Western Kentucky University has discounted the rate for all seven participants as part of the partnership for the Grow Your Own program. 

WFIE-TV, Evansville 

  • OPS announces ‘Grow Your Own’ scholarship recipients: Owensboro Public Schools announced “Grow Your Own” scholarship winners on Tuesday. The school district was awarded a $50,000 grant from the Kentucky Department of Education that was used for students to get education classes through Western Kentucky University. 

Lane Report 

  • Louisville Bar Association welcomes Miller as new executive director: After a national search, the Louisville Bar Association (LBA) has named Louisville native Kristen Miller the organization’s next executive director, effective November 8. A graduate of Western Kentucky University and the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, Kristen Miller brings experience from the healthcare, legal, nonprofit, and government sectors. 

Dayton (OH) Daily News 

  • Jim Gaines to lead statehouse coverage: Jim Gaines has begun work as the statehouse bureau chief for the Dayton Daily News, Springfield News-Sun and Journal-News newspapers. Gaines, 52, is originally from Michigan but has lived about half his life in Kentucky. He is a graduate of Western Kentucky University with a bachelor’s degree in history and government, and a subsequent bachelor’s in journalism. 

Nashville (TN) Ledger 

  • Rue joins Patterson Intellectual Property Law: Patterson Intellectual Property Law has added David Rue as the firm’s chief operating officer. Rue, an attorney, entrepreneur and law firm strategist, will focus on the firm’s operations and strategic development. Rue is a graduate of Western Kentucky University and the J. David Rosenberg College of Law at the University of Kentucky. 

Campus Rec Magazine 

PRWeb 

  • HerdDogg Joins WKU SmartHolstein Project to Accelerate Data Collection and Analysis for Landmark Genetic Study: HerdDogg, the agtech innovator that creates more value for producers’ livestock, has joined the WKU SmartHolstein Lab program to equip scientists with real-time animal biometric data that is critical to understanding dairy cow health and wellbeing. The WKU SmartHolstein Lab is a strategic, synergistic partnership between Holstein Association USA and Western Kentucky University Department of Agriculture and Food Science. Its mission is to lead Holstein and dairy advancements through research, development, and outreach in technologies, analytics, and genetics. 

Sept. 4-20, 2021

WKU Public Radio 

  • Local Research Study Confirms COVID-19 Vaccine Safety: New research suggests side-effects from the COVID-19 vaccine among south central Kentucky residents mirror the results of clinical trials conducted last year. A project by Bowling Green-based Med Center Health, Western Kentucky University, and the University of Kentucky College of Medicine - Bowling Green Campus was conducted through the Western Kentucky Heart and Lung/Med Center Health Research Foundation. 
  • The African American Folklorist: Preserving Black Bowling Green Through Art: In 1956, Margaret Munday became the first African American student to enroll at Western Kentucky University. She graduated in 1960. Today, Northeast Hall on the school's campus has been renamed Munday Hall in honor of Margaret and her many achievements. 

Daily News 

  • SBDC again providing in-person counseling: Yates and Kors have offices in Western Kentucky University’s Center for Research and Development at Nashville Road and Campbell Lane. Meetings there can be important for the new businesses and potential startups that Yates said make up about 80% of their clients. 
  • Daughter finds father’s missing WWII foot locker after 77 years: Velda Alexander never met her father, Johnnie Elmore, who was killed in action during World War II. But a recent discovery finally connected her with the hero she always wanted to meet. Elmore graduated from Western Kentucky University, where he was a member of the ROTC. He later taught ROTC at Indiana University in Bloomington. He was 31 years old when he was killed in action. 
  • Local research survey: COVID vaccines are safe: A research project from Med Center Health, Western Kentucky University and the UK College of Medicine’s Bowling Green campus found COVID-19 vaccines were safe and closely mirrored results found in clinical trials. 
  • WKU names first lotto winners in vaccine incentive program: Western Kentucky University held the first of several lottery drawings for students and staff who’ve received the coronavirus vaccine, doling out scholarships and cash prizes to winners. 
  • Bowling Green residents past and present share 9/11 experiences: Elsewhere, Western Kentucky University professor James Kenney had just walked into work and was immediately met by several of his photojournalism students. In the immediate aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center, Kenney said about 20 students had no hesitation in making the decision to travel to New York City. 
  • New adaptive sports program coming to WKU: There are fewer than 30 collegiate adaptive sports programs in the country, but Western Kentucky University will join that group this fall. Thanks to a partnership between the Bowling Green Parks & Recreation Department and WKU Campus Recreation and Wellness, the university will roll out its first sports program for students of all abilities Oct. 24. 
  • Nursing student urges vaccination amid delta surge: Between caring for COVID-19 patients, administering vaccinations, testing for the coronavirus and notifying the infected, local nursing student Andi Barefoot has received a master class in public health. “I’ve gotten a good grasp on what the pandemic holds,” said Barefoot, who is in her final semester at Western Kentucky University’s nursing program. 

WNKY-TV 

  • Runners raise money for scholarship in honor of fallen soldier: A 5k run took place Wednesday at Chaney’s Dairy Barn in Warren County in memorial of a soldier who was killed in the line of duty back in 2010. Eric Yates Memorial 5K is held annually to raise money for the 1st Lt. Eric Yates Memorial Scholarship Fund. 
  • Voices of Honor – Fred Alcott: After graduating from WKU in 1963 with a degree in agriculture, Fred Alcott was drafted into the army. He went to the navy instead, learned to fly helicopters, and searched for soviet submarines during the cold war. 
  • WKU awards prizes for vaccinated: Western Kentucky University has a new way of rewarding people for getting their Covid vaccines. 
  • A.G. Daniel Cameron hosts Search Warrant Task Force at WKU: Tuesday, Attorney General Daniel Cameron and the rest of the Search Warrant Task Force in the state held a meeting at Western Kentucky University to continue work on identifying ways to request, serve and carry out search warrants in the safest and most effective way possible. 
  • Flora’s Hidden Heroes – Thomas Weakley: Thomas Weakley has been a Western Kentucky University professor and campus pastor for decades, working to change the University for the better. He’s this week’s Flora’s Hidden Hero. 
  • Sunrise Spotlight – Adaptive Sports @ WKU: On Today’s Sunrise Spotlight, Cameron Levis and Maddie Duncan join us live in-studio to talk about the Adaptive sports program, a joint effort between Bowling Green Parks & Recreation and Western Kentucky University. 

WBKO-TV 

  • Gatton Academy Seniors set new record of National Merit Semifinalists: 26 seniors from The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition, breaking the 2019 record of the most students recognized in a single school year in the program’s history. 
  • Attorney General’s Search Warrant Task Force meets in Bowling Green: Back in January, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the formation of a search warrant task force. On Tuesday, the task force was able to meet on Western’s Campus, where they asked questions and also discussed moving forward. 
  • Charles Forrester art exhibition opens at Downing Museum: Charles Forrester was a gifted sculptor and artist whose artwork spanned six decades. An exhibit featuring his work opens September 14 at the Downing Museum at Baker Arboretum. Forrester taught art classes at Western Kentucky University and started the sculpture program at WKU. He passed away in 2010. 
  • Local study confirms COVID-19 vaccine safety: A research project between Med Center Health, Western Kentucky University, and the UK College of Medicine- Bowling Green Campus was conducted through the Western Kentucky Heart and Lung/Med Center Health Research Foundation. 
  • Med Center Health research project highlights vaccine safety, side effects: Dr. Doug McElroy, a biology professor at WKU says the most important step to the research was asking the correct questions. “Really critical in ensuring that we had a well crafted and reliable survey so that we could believe the results. And you know, obviously, that’s pretty critical as well,” said McElroy. 

Spectrum News 1 

  • Reclaiming the stage: Fine arts teacher hopeful for return of theater: Over the past 12 months, the theater industry has endured closed doors, empty seats and virtual shows. The profound impact of the pandemic has been felt by many, including performers and teachers like Austin Vahle who teaches at Brenda Cowan Elementary (BCE) School. Vahle is a two time Western Kentucky University alum who, after he applied for one job teaching theater at BCE, began making a realization that would change his life. 
  • Students in WKU game design program look to enter the growing industry: Western Kentucky University's game design program is giving students like Natashja Gentry the resources to jump right into the gaming world. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Two ODT alums dance professionally: Cherokee Bennett and Abby Palmiter both started dancing at Joy Johnson’s Dance Studio when they were 3 years old. Bennett graduated from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor degree in dance in 2019. Palmiter is a 2021 graduate of WKU, also holding a dance degree. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Powell uses farm, education lessons in life: Darrin Powell has brought education and farming together to shape his career. He’s currently the interim chief academic officer at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, working in various roles at the school for 22 years. He got his teacher certification in mathematics and computer programming at Western Kentucky University. 

Owensboro Times 

  • Three local students named National Merit semifinalists: Local students Catherine Elizabeth Wright, Dylan Mather, and Hunter Wimsatt have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition. Wright attends Apollo High School, and Mather attends Owensboro High School. Wimsatt attends The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky but is still considered a student at Owensboro Catholic High School. 

Frankfort State-Journal 

  • Gatton Academy seniors set new record of National Merit Semifinalists: Twenty-six seniors from The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition, breaking the 2019 record of the most students recognized in a single school year in the program’s history. Included in the twenty-six seniors are Marcus Negron and Anish Penmecha, both of Western Hills. 

Lane Report 

  • Appointments to Kentucky Boards and Commissions: Gov. Andy Beshear has reappointed Melanie Eaton to the Kentucky Board of Licensure for Long-Term Care Administrators. Eaton of Adairville is an instructor at Western Kentucky University and shall serve for a term expiring Jan. 12, 2025. 
  • C2 Strategic Communications hires Thomas George as senior director: Thomas George, a distinguished trailblazing journalist, and Kentucky native will join C2 Strategic Communications as a senior director next month, focusing on attracting new clients and diverse talent to the regional public relations firm. George, a Western Kentucky University graduate, was inducted into WKU’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. 
  • Appointments to Kentucky Boards and Commissions: Gov. Andy Beshear appointed the following as members of the Reading Diagnostic and Intervention Grant Steering Committee: Nancy Hulan of Bowling Green is a professor at Western Kentucky University and shall serve for a term expiring Sept. 1, 2022. 

WTVQ-TV, Lexington 

  • Five from region at Gatton are Merit Semifinalists: Twenty-six seniors from The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Bowling Green, Ky., have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition, breaking the 2019 record of the most students recognized in a single school year in the program’s history. The list includes five students from Eastern Kentucky. 


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 Last Modified 11/23/21