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WKU in the News


Here is a selection of recent news stories about WKU:

September 17-28, 2022

Daily News 

  • Warren to lead Contractors Licensing Board: In a called meeting Monday evening, the board voted unanimously to hire current Contractors Licensing Board office manager Holly Warren for the executive director position that Bob Appling retired from in June. A Clinton County native who graduated from Western Kentucky University in 1997 with degrees in chemistry and biology, Warren came to the contractors licensing board through her role as construction supervisor at Minit Mart Foods. 
  • Downtown BGKY Harvest Festival returns Oct. 15: The WKU Student Alumni Ambassadors will decorate the Heritage Trail between the parks and Warren County Public Library will set up a Story Trail, also between the parks, Angel said. 
  • "Civic imagination incubator" launches, aims to envision change through storytelling: A diverse cohort of media creators began exploring their civic imaginations through storytelling at the official launch of WKU's first Civic Imagination Incubator on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the university's Innovation Campus. 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

Barren County Progress 

  • 100 years of greatness – KY Veteran and former BC Superintendent honored: The cheers and excitement became louder and more prominent as World War II, U.S. Army Veteran, Lee Robertson entered the “Homecoming Celebration” at Louisville International Airport on Wednesday, September 7, 2022 around 10:40 p.m.  His smile was vibrant and his handshake was strong as he greeted the massive crowd that was waiting to welcome him and 81 Veterans “home.” 

Dairy Agenda Today 

WTOP-FM, Washington, DC 

  • What a College Minor Is and Why It Matters: While students may want to find a minor that complements their major, they should also consider how it will help them develop skills and experiences that could be valuable in their careers, says Fabián Álvarez, assistant English professor at Western Kentucky University. WKU requires students in certain bachelor’s degree programs to complete a minor. 

August 27-September 16, 2022

Daily News 

  • Mammoth Cave celebration begins with 'mammoth' mapping project: WKU professor Chris Groves shared the sense of possibility. “It seems like everything’s already been discovered and found and used up,” Groves said. “And to some degree, it has – there’s no new mountains. But every single month, CRF has expeditions and people are going into new places that no human’s ever been before. There’s really not that many places in the world that you can still do that.” 
  • Caboni talks compensation at Senate meeting: Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni said Tuesday an 8% raise pool for faculty and staff to match the current inflation rate isn’t feasible. 
  • Service One expands again, plans new BG location: Once confined largely to the Western Kentucky University campus, Bowling Green’s Service One Credit Union is continuing to grow outside and within its home city. 
  • Four-year wait culminates in Commons at Helm Library ribbon-cutting: The main floor’s a coffee shop, the basement’s a food court and the second floor’s a library. Wide windows flood the area with natural lighting as conversations coalesce at the building’s center – the original center circle of Western Kentucky University’s old basketball court used from 1931 to 1963. 
  • Caboni addresses WKU approach to challenges: “We’re back, and we’re back big-time.” That’s Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni’s motto for the 2022-23 academic year, he said in an interview with the Daily News last week. 
  • NAACP state convention heading to Bowling Green: Kentucky NAACP members will descend on Bowling Green next month as the local chapter of the civil rights organization hosts the state convention. The state convention will be Sept. 16-17 at Western Kentucky University with most events at the Downing Student Union. 

WKU Public Radio 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Caboni advocates for changes in student loans: Timothy Caboni, president of Western Kentucky University, spoke at the Owensboro Rotary Club meeting on Wednesday, advocating for changes in higher education and student loans. 
  • 4 OPS students part of Project Launch Plus: Four Owensboro Public Schools students participated in Project Launch Plus, a program through the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program grant. The Center for Gifted Studies at Western Kentucky University announced 34 districts in Kentucky and Tennessee would be participating in this project. 
  • Tech Savvy: Coke helping farmers use data to improve yields: Kahlan Coke has gone from helping raise chickens to guiding farmers about how to use the latest agricultural technology. Coke, 24, is an integrated solutions consultant for Wright Implement who grew up on her family’s farm in West Louisville. And by the time she was a senior at AHS, Coke knew she wanted to major in agriculture in college. She earned her bachelor’s degree in ag business from Western Kentucky University. 

Owensboro Times 

McLean County News 

Metropolis (IL) Planet 

  • PSO welcomes violin professor in key role: An acclaimed violinist will take the spotlight this weekend at The Carson Center, as the Paducah Symphony Orchestra opens its 2022-23 concert season for the community and officially welcomes Dr. Ching-Yi Lin as its new concertmaster. Lin, an associate professor at Western Kentucky University, began learning violin at a young age, and has since performed around the world. 

WJRS-FM, Russell Springs 

  • RCMS participates in Project Launch Plus at WKU: Russell County Middle School was one of several schools in Kentucky and Tennessee that participated in the Center for Gifted Studies’ Project Launch Plus at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green this past school year. 

Wallet Hub

  • No-Fault Insurance: What are the advantages of no-fault insurance laws? -- Sebastian Leguizamon, Associate Professor, WKU

August 11-26, 2022

Daily News 

WBKO-TV

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU students react to Biden’s announcement on debt relief: President Biden is saying that he will be following through on his campaign promise, and relieve some student debt. News 40 took to the campus of Western Kentucky University to get students’ reactions. 
  • WCPS encourage students to be teachers at ‘Welcome Back WKU’: Welcome back Western Kentucky University students! Dozens of local businesses and organizations gathered in tents on South Lawn for ‘Welcome Back WKU’…. presenting giveaways, prizes and playing games with students. 
  • Get ready for class with Big Red Backpack: Western Kentucky University is making it a little easier for students to be prepared for the first day of class this year. Introducing the new Big Red Backpack. Students can sign up to have all the books they need for every class put together by the bookstore. They then pick everything up, all at once.

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Owsley keeps history alive: Bob Owsley knows all there is to know about The Cecilian Bank. And he should. He has worked there since Sept. 2, 1958, and has done nearly every job there is to do there. After growing up in Rinevyille on a dairy farm, he attended Western Kentucky University, initially to become a pharmacist. Three semesters in, he was drafted into the U.S. Army. 

Louisville Courier Journal 

MIT Technology Review 

  • Bolstering innovation in the heart of America: When people think about Kentucky, they often picture bluegrass, horses, and bourbon—not necessarily a vibrant ecosystem of entrepreneurs and startups. As executive director of the nonprofit AccelerateKY, WKU graduate Sam Ford is aiming to change that. “Everyone’s always excited to talk about bourbon, but Kentucky’s also a major leader in electric batteries,” says Ford, a graduate of MIT’s Comparative Media Studies (CMS) program. “We have advanced manufacturing, metals, software development, ag tech.” 

Owensboro Times 

  • Ward receives award for contributions to field of engineering and community: Owensboro’s Dylan Ward was recently named the co-recipient of the 2022 New Professional of the Year Award sponsored by the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE). Ward received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 2013 from Western Kentucky University where he also received the Ogden Foundation Scholar Award. He went on to obtain a Master of Public Administration Degree from WKU in 2018 while working full-time. 

Spectrum News 1 

  • Online, hybrid learning still prevalent for Kentucky college students: The University of Louisville, Western Kentucky University and University of Kentucky on Monday welcomed students back on campus for the first day of classes. However, campuses might not see as many students walking around as enrolled because recent data show more and more people are opting to take online classes. 

Macon County (TN) Times 

  • PHS grad, WKU student Colovos begins NASA internship: Portland High School graduate Zachary Colovos, the 2020 valedictorian at the school, is in the beginning of a unique opportunity as an intern at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Colovos is among a crew of about 20 interns at the space center. He began his paid internship Monday, and he said if all goes well, at the conclusion of his time there with a degree in mechanical engineering in hand from Western Kentucky University, he will have a full-time job. 

July 28-August 10, 2022

Daily News 

  • Planetarium's Science Fun Day to showcase Webb Telescope: NASA launched the James Webb Telescope into space on Dec. 25. To educate the public about it, Western Kentucky University’s Hardin Planetarium will host a Science Fun Day with activities for all ages. 
  • County COVID-19 cases rise as school returns: David Oliver, director of environmental health and safety at Western Kentucky University, announced in a universitywide email Wednesday that WKU does not anticipate starting the year with a mask requirement or by limiting indoor capacities. 
  • More players getting involved in Lost River Cave suds investigation: Since last week, a testing team comprised of the Department of Water, the city of Bowling Green environmental office and Western Kentucky University has “been working nonstop on this,” Lansden said. 
  • WKU Regents decline to dismiss professor: Western Kentucky University’s Board of Regents voted 8-0 on Friday to not dismiss Dr. Jeanine Huss, a tenured professor in the School of Teacher Education, after an all-day hearing to decide if she was to be dismissed. 
  • First responders take part in active shooter training: Emergency personnel and members of several law enforcement agencies have converged on Western Kentucky University’s campus this week to take part in training exercises to aid in their response to a potential active shooter. 

WNKY-TV 

  • TVA contributes Recovery Funds to African American Museum of Bowling Green: The Tennessee Valley Authority contributed recovery funds to the African American Museum of Bowling Green during the Shake Rag Festival, on Saturday. John Hardin, a member of the Board of Trustees for the African American Museum, says they plan to use the money to restore many artifacts that are currently being held at Western Kentucky University. 
  • WKU offers early housing to students affected by eastern Kentucky flooding: Western Kentucky University has open arms for students affected from the flooding in eastern Kentucky. 
  • WKU active shooter training: Today began active shooter training at WKU for the week. Local agencies came together this morning to coordinate search and rescue procedures along with strategic communication in order to prepare for a situation in which an active shooter enters a dorm. 
  • Are we in a recession? What you should worry about: “We may already be in a recession,” said WKU Assistant Professor of Economics Jon Handy. Many people are worried about what’s coming next for the economy. Is a recession looming? 

WBKO-TV 

Fast Company 

  • Kyla Scanlon explains the economy, inflation, and the stock market so you can actually understand it: Scanlon, like many of her Robinhood generation peers, started trading stocks as a teenager. But instead of taking her cues from Reddit forums like WallStreetBets, she went to Western Kentucky University (on a full scholarship) to study finance, economics, and data analytics, and then joined a West Coast investment manager after graduating. She envisioned a future as an economics professor. Then the pandemic intervened. Out of boredom, she started posting TikTok videos in 2021 and soon found her niche: A rapid-fire daily synthesis of market trends and economic news, delivered with the authority of a central banker and the absurdist humor of a Gen Z native, all in less than 60 seconds. There is no one doing anything like it.

Portland (TN) Sun 

  • Portland native doing internship at NASA: Western Kentucky University junior and 2020 Portland High School graduate Zac Colovos has been accepted in the NASA Pathways Internship program at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. 

Owensboro Times 

  • Ball named CEO of Advanced Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine: Ginny Ball, with over 18 years of experience in health care administration and over 12 years as a managing executive in the Owensboro community, recently took over as the new CEO of Advanced Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine. Ball earned her bachelor’s degree in health care administration at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green. 

Barren County Progress 

  • Muhlenkamp chosen as Glasgow’s Superintendent: Dr. Chad Muhlenkamp has been named superintendent for Glasgow Independent Schools. He attended the University of the Cumberlands, earning a bachelor’s degree in elementary and special education, and obtained a master’s degree in Elementary Education Curriculum and Instruction and School Administration along with other certifications from Western Kentucky University. 

July 15-27, 2022

Daily News 

  • WKU summer strings camp back after COVID break: Rhythmic applause can be heard this week down the hallway at the Ivan Wilson Center For Fine Arts at Western Kentucky University as 4-year-old children take their first steps in learning how to play the violin as part of the WKU Summer String Institute weeklong program. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • North Hardin grad back in home state for TV news gig: Building a career in TV journalism, Paxton Boyd has had multi-station opportunities that led him back home to Kentucky. Boyd, a 2004 graduate of North Hardin High School, went to Western Kentucky University where he earned a bachelor’s degree in broadcasting and had a minor in psychology. 
  • Strength and conditioning coach mentors athletes: After serving in the U.S. Army and working with college athletes, Dominique Adams began working with youth in Hardin County to help prepare them for the next level in athletics and whatever they do in life. Originally from Indianapolis, Adams, 35, came to Hardin County in 2006 when he was stationed at Fort Knox. He was there until 2008. He served eight years in the Army. After that he went to college at Western Kentucky University and, as he was getting his master’s degree, Adams became a graduate assistant strength and conditioning coach for WKU Athletics. After graduation, was hired as assistant strength and conditioning coach. 

WBKO-TV 

  • Teacher incentives provided by the state and WKU amid teacher shortage: WKU is aiming to pave the way in tackling the nationwide teacher shortage. “Western is poised to be the national model for enrollment in educator preparation,” said Dr. Corinne Murphy, the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences at Western Kentucky University. 

WNKY-TV 

  • Voices of Honor – Lee Robertson: Last month Lee Robertson, known to many as Mr. Western, celebrated his 100th birthday. On this week’s Voices of Honor, Robertson tells us about his service with the 44th Tank Battalion in World War 2. 

Lane Report 

  • New collaborative aims to address healthcare workforce shortage: The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education announced its Healthcare Workforce Collaborative, a new partnership with colleges and universities, state agencies, the healthcare industry and the K-12 education system to address Kentucky’s critical healthcare workforce shortage. Healthcare Workforce Collaborative Advisory Group members include: Tania Basta, College of Health and Human Services dean, Western Kentucky University 
  • KYNETIC funds 9 proof-of-concept projects across Kentucky: The Kentucky Network for Innovation and Commercialization (KYNETIC) funded nine proof-of-concept projects in the Cycle 5 round of early-stage commercialization grants. KYNETIC distributed $325,000 in Cycle 5 and awardees included: Daniel Boamah (Western Kentucky University), Development of a Multitenant Mixed/Virtual Reality Platform for Increasing Awareness of Implicit Bias in Child Welfare Decision-Making: A Public Health Crisis 

WYMT-TV, Hazard 

WRIC-TV, Richmond, VA 

  • Fundraising Alzheimer’s disease research: Bike4Alz cyclists pedal through Richmond: Cyclists pedaling for a purpose zipped through Richmond Tuesday afternoon. The Bike4Alz Riders and support vehicles will stop at the University of Richmond’s Phi Gamma Delta clubhouse on Old Fraternity Row to connect with their fellow fraternity brothers and then have a celebratory meal. The cyclists are students at Western Kentucky University at Bowling Green. 

Homeland Security Today 

July 7-14, 2022

Daily News 

  • United Way awards $585,000 to Warren County nonprofits: United Way of Southern Kentucky awarded $585,000 to Warren County nonprofits Wednesday. The list of grant recipients includes: WKU, Suzanne Vitale CED, Building Bridges to Kindergarten: $9,000; Lifeworks E-Learning Lab, Electronic Access to Employment Training Services for Young Adults with Autism at WKU: $3,450. 
  • Bell book talk benefits tornado relief: A spacious auditorium at the Warren County Public Library’s main branch was bursting with lively discussions Tuesday as local author David Bell discussed his latest book. 
  • WKU welcomes pair of new regents: Western Kentucky University’s Board of Regents will feature two new faces after Gov. Andy Beshear appointed a pair of members. 

Spectrum News 1 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Bland joins extension office in dual role: Kelly Bland is the new extension agent for family and consumer sciences and 4-H youth development for the McLean County Cooperative Extension Office in Calhoun. After graduating Owensboro High School, Bland attended Western Kentucky University with intentions to become a teacher, but she switched gears and graduated with a degree in therapeutic recreation and tourism in 1996. 
  • Local artist holds exhibit of historical pictures: On the walls of the Senior Community Center of Owensboro-Daviess County hangs the many charcoal, acrylic and watercolor pictures drawn by a local Owensboro artist. Frederica Diane Huff has been a Daviess County resident since she first arrived here in 1975. She graduated from Western Kentucky University in 1975 with a bachelor’s degree of fine arts before pursuing a master’s degree in art education in 2001. 
  • Owensboro Health names new CFO: Owensboro Health announced Russ Ranallo as its new chief financial officer on Thursday, effective immediately. He earned a master’s degree in health administration from Western Kentucky University in 1994. 
  • Bike4Alz riders host silent auction fundraiser: Pens were clicking as bidders lined up to participate in the Bike4Alz silent auction fundraiser Wednesday evening at Feta Pizza in Owensboro. The event was in conjunction with a group of 13 students from Western Kentucky University passing through the city while bicycling from San Francisco to Virginia Beach, Virginia, to raise money and awareness for Alzheimer’s Disease research. 

Owensboro Times 

  • Emma Goetz joins Retirement & Financial Strategies as advisor: Emma Goetz has joined Retirement & Financial Strategies as a Financial Advisor. Emma graduated Summa Cum Laude in 2021 from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor’s degree in Finance with a concentration in Personal Financial Planning. 

Lane Report 

  • Marketing: Influential Partnerships: A key Ale-8 influencer is blogger and influencer JC Phelps of “JCP Eats,” who has been a strategic partner and marketing consultant. He holds a bachelor’s in economics and finance from Centre College and an MBA from the Gordon Ford College of Business at Western Kentucky University. 

WEHT-TV, Evansville, IN 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • HCS employee named social worker of the year: A Hardin County Schools student support specialist was recognized recently for his work with students in the school system. According to a news release from HCS, Rudy Garcia was selected as the 2022 Kentucky School Social Worker of the Year by the Kentucky Association for School Social Work. Garcia is an adjunct social work professor for the University of Louisville and Western Kentucky University. 

June 25-July 6, 2022

Daily News 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Bike4Alz cycling through city next week: Thirteen students from Western Kentucky University currently bicycling from San Francisco to Virginia Beach, Virginia, will be passing through Owensboro next week. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • New principal named for James T. Alton Middle School: A new principal will be at the helm for James T. Alton Middle School this coming academic year. Danielle Cassady, an assistant principal at West Hardin Middle School, has been named the lead educator for the middle school in Vine Grove, according to news release from Hardin County Schools. She earned her master’s degree from Western Kentucky University. 
  • WKU names new academic advisor for its E’town site: Western Kentucky University in Elizabethtown has a new academic advisor. Julie Hoisington was named to the role following the retirement of long-time WKU academic advisor Gail Smallwood, who held the position for 22 years, according to a news release from the university. 

Lane Report 

  • Paxton Boyd will be ABC 36 new main anchor: ABC 36 News Director Miranda Combs announced a new main anchor for WTVQ ABC 36. TV journalist and Elizabethtown, Kentucky, native Paxton Boyd will take the desk. Boyd graduated from Western Kentucky with a degree in broadcast journalism. 

WKYT-TV, Lexington 

Princeton Times-Leader 

  • Englebright selected as WKU Alumni Ambassador: Emerson Englebright, of Princeton, was selected as one of 30 new Western Kentucky University’s Student Alumni Ambassadors. The Alumni Ambassadors recently welcomed 30 new members, bringing the membership total to 41 for fall 2022. 

Kentucky Ag Connection 

  • EPA Awards Grant to WKU Team's Radon Mitigation Project: A team of students in Western Kentucky University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has been awarded a $24,971 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for a research project on radon mitigation in homes. 
  • Coding Academy Graduate Finds Purpose on Fort Knox: Lesley Downs, originally from Bardstown, is a graduate of the Spring 2020 and first Greater Knox Coding Academy class, whose higher educational journey began at Western Kentucky University with a bachelor's degree in entrepreneurship and a certificate in distilling arts and sciences. 

Think Advisor 

  • Ron Rhoades Makes 5 Predictions for the Future of Fiduciary Advice: “You can’t serve two masters: Under the SEC, you can be a fiduciary for part of the [client] relationship … and then have another account that’s a brokerage account. [But] you can do some really bad stuff because a different standard applies,” fiduciary expert Ron A. Rhoades argues in an interview with ThinkAdvisor. Rhoades, associate professor of finance and director of the Personal Financial Planning Program at Western Kentucky University, is also a financial advisor and education content specialist at ARG Investment Services, an RIA. 

June 14-24, 2022

Daily News 

  • Cumberland Trace Elementary picks Darnell as new principal: The Cumberland Trace Elementary School site-based decision-making council named curriculum coordinator Lori Darnell as the school’s new principal Monday. Darnell is a product of Western Kentucky University, earning her Bachelor of Science in elementary education, Master of Arts in teacher leadership and Rank 1 in administration all on the Hill. She has nine years of experience in education. 
  • Startup Compost BG turning scraps into cash: Charlie O’Connell is definitely getting his hands dirty as he grows his startup small business. In fact, he’s taking that truism to the extreme, with the potential to have an extreme impact on the local environment. Owner of Bitsy Farm in Rockfield, O’Connell started in March his Compost Bowling Green business that collects food scraps from homes and businesses for composting at the Western Kentucky University Farm. 
  • 'Proud to be among 'em': Vietnam vets among 12 aviators honored at Hangar Party: Charlie Browning’s journey to being honored for his service in the Vietnam War has taken more twists and turns than one of the UH-1 (Huey) helicopters he once flew. Browning, a graduate of both Bowling Green High School and Western Kentucky University, was joined by highly decorated veterans of World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars in being recognized Saturday. 
  • New exhibition focused on Latino art: A spacious room in the Kentucky Museum at Western Kentucky University was filled Wednesday with laughter and lively chatter in Spanish at the opening of a new art exhibition called Nuestro Hogar Kentucky – Our Kentucky Home. 
  • ‘I’m beginning my second one hundred’: Mr. Western turns 100: Lee Robertson, affectionately known as “Mr. Western” for his strong ties to Western Kentucky University, celebrated his 100th birthday Thursday with a huge crowd of friends, co-workers, family and acquaintances at a packed Eva and Jim Martens Alumni Center. 
  • Learning Festival coming to WKU Innovation Campus: A group of seven Massachusetts Institute of Technology students is bicycling 3,000 miles across the United States to host workshops for middle school students, with Bowling Green as one of their stops. The MIT Spokes Learning Festival, a free one-day STEM workshop, will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 22 at the Western Kentucky University Innovation Campus at 2413 Nashville Road. 
  • WKU's 2023 budget kicks major projects into gear: Western Kentucky University’s Board of Regents approved the university’s budget for the 2023 fiscal year on Friday, paving the way for a handful of major construction projects and overhauls to its ever-changing campus. 

WNKY-TV 

  • MIT students bike to BG to teach STEM on 3,800 mile trip: A group of six MIT students, called the MIT Spokes, are on a 3,800 mile cross country bike trip. They stop in cities, like Bowling Green, to give stem workshops to middle school students. 
  • Cumberland Trace Elementary School announces new principal: The Cumberland Trace Elementary Site-Based Decision Making Council announced Lori Darnell as the next principal of Cumberland Trace Elementary School. Darnell received her rank 1 in administration, a master of arts degree in teacher leadership with an endorsement in gifted and talented, and a bachelor of science degree in elementary education, all from Western Kentucky University. 
  • Lee Robertson, ‘Mr. Western,’ celebrates turning 100: Mr. Western, a well-known feature of Western Kentucky University, celebrated a milestone today. On Thursday, June 16, Lee Robertson, also known as Mr. Western, turned 100 years old. 

WBKO-TV 

Lane Report 

  • Grant helps Kentucky colleges improve online courses: New grant funding from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education is helping public colleges and universities ensure their online course offerings are high-quality and prepare students for success. CPE provided $10,000 in funding for institutions to seek Quality Matters (QM) certification for online classes. The following WKU courses were certified through the grant award: LEAD 530 Organizational Change, MATH 136 Calculus I 

Gallatin (TN) News 

Jackson County Sun 

  • Annville Resident Interns for Senator McConnell in Washington, D.C.: Autumn Jones of Annville, Kentucky interned for U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) this summer in his Washington, D.C. office. She is a junior at Western Kentucky University pursuing a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Business Administration. 

May 25-June 13, 2022

WKU Public Radio 

Daily News 

  • Gatton Academy students take first at Kentucky Envirothon: Five students from the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science took first place at the Kentucky Envirothon Competition on May 18-19 at North Central 4-H Camp in Carlisle. 
  • WKU ties for first place in diversity report: Both Western Kentucky University and University of Kentucky got 30 out of 36 points on the recent diversity, equity and inclusion report, produced by the Council on Postsecondary Education, resulting in a draw for the highest score among public universities and community colleges in Kentucky.
  • WKU to host 'Imagination Incubator': Western Kentucky University’s Potter College of Arts and Letters and the university’s Innovation Campus will team up with the University of Southern California for a “Civic Imagination Incubator.” 
  • WKU Upward Bound receives $2.1 million federal grant: The U.S. Department of Education awarded Western Kentucky University’s Upward Bound, a program that seeks to improve the rate at which students complete high school and enroll in postsecondary institutions, a five-year grant totaling $2.1 million.

WNKY-TV 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • EIS announces three hires: Elizabethtown Independent Schools this week announced three new hires. Chase Goff, a Warren County High School graduate, has been hired as the assistant superintendent for student learning starting the 2022 -2023 school year. Goff earned his Bachelor’s Degree in economics at Western Kentucky University. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Melton selected as new Livermore principal: On June 1, Kelly Melton was named the new principal of Livermore Elementary. Melton received both her bachelors and masters degrees in elementary education from Western Kentucky University. 

Education Week 

  • What Happens When Districts, States, and Universities Collaborate on Principal-Prep?:The nearly $50 million Wallace Foundation effort aimed to spur states, universities, and districts to redesign programs and supports for principals to be more in line with emerging research on what school leaders need to know and the realities of the job. The universities in the program were Albany State University in Albany, Ga.; the University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn.; Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Fla.; North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C.; San Diego State University; Virginia State University, Petersburg, Va.; and Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Ky. 

April 29-May 24, 2022

Daily News 

  • Sensory garden provides patch of peace: A cozy, tranquil garden can be found adjacent to the College Heights Foundation’s Cliff Todd Center, complete with gravel pathways, stone benches and more than 80 plant species. 
  • Late Bowling Green artist's works live on at gallery: Bowling Green artist and retired Western Kentucky University art professor Ivan Schieferdecker had been planning to show some of his works at an exhibit in a local gallery this month. He passed away March 26 at age 86, but before his death he was able to complete his pieces for the exhibit at Ellis Walker Gallery in Thoroughbred Square.
  • Hardcastles honored as SC Kentuckians of the Year: A 1951 graduate of Alvaton High School and 1956 graduate of Western Kentucky University, Charles Hardcastle achieved success with BG Chemical and its successor Consolidated Paper Group as well as with Citizens First Bank. 
  • Bell’s new book tackles higher education: David Bell has written more than a dozen books, but his latest story set to release this summer will take aim at the lengths both students and colleges will go to survive in a resource-starved academic world. “The Finalists” is the 14th book that Bell, a professor of English at Western Kentucky University, has written. 

WKU Public Radio 

  • Kentucky Mesonet adds new station in Ballard County: A statewide source for weather and climate data has added a new station in Ballard County. The new Kentucky Mesonet station in Ballard County is in what’s been an underserved area with regard to weather data. 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

Paducah Sun 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Kelly Miller to take helm at Lincoln Trail Elementary: Lincoln Trail Elementary School Assistant Principal Kelly Miller has been selected by site-based decision-making council to serve as the school’s next principal. She is a graduate of Central Hardin High School and Western Kentucky University. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • WKU-O grad went from homeless to master's degree: Amanda Brothers made her dream come true Monday night when she walked across the stage in Blandford Hall at Owensboro Community & Technical College. Western Kentucky University-Owensboro was recognizing its 2022 graduates including Brothers, who was the student speaker at the ceremony. 

Madisonville Messenger 

  • Clark named new principal of Pride Elementary: Amy Clark was selected as the new principal of Pride Elementary School. Clark earned her bachelor’s degree in secondary education, English and allied language arts, from Western Kentucky University. 
  • Zimmer named new HCCHS principal: Michael Zimmer was selected as the new principal at Hopkins County Central High School. Zimmer earned his bachelor’s degree from Western Kentucky University. 

Lancaster (PA) Online 

  • Bingocize blends bingo and exercise for a healthy dose of fun: That somebody was Jason Crandall, an associate professor of exercise science and co-director of the Center for Applied Science in Health & Aging at Western Kentucky University. Crandall calls the creation of Bingocize serendipitous more than anything else. 

News Virginian, Waynesboro, VA 

Lane Report 

  • KCV IMPACT Competition awards six innovative projects: Kentucky Commercialization Ventures is pleased to announce the winners of the inaugural KCV IMPACT (Innovative Mobile, Public Health, And Community-Oriented Technologies) Competition. 1st place – $25,000 each: Dr. Rachel Tinius – WKU, BumptUp: an evidence-based digital technology to improve physical activity and health outcomes among pregnant and postpartum women; and Dr. Daniel Boamah – WKU, Development of a Multitenant Mixed/Virtual Reality Platform for Increasing Awareness of Implicit Bias in Child Welfare Decision-Making: A Public Health Crisis 
  • CPE 2022 Academic Leadership Development Institute members named: The Council on Postsecondary Education named the fourth cadre of its Academic Leadership Development Institute (ALDI) program, which aims to prepare minority faculty and staff members for leadership roles in Kentucky higher education. 2022 Academic Leadership Development Institute participants from WKU: Lester “Les” Archer, Daniel Boahmah, Denise Hardesty. 

Lafayette (IN) Journal & Courier 

  • Greater Lafayette young professionals honored for manufacturing, logistics talent: Conexus Indiana provided the following snapshots of Greater Lafayette honorees: Matthew Cooper, Supplier Quality Engineering group leader, Subaru of Indiana Automotive -- Internships and a hands-on college engineering program allowed Cooper to graduate from Western Kentucky University and immediately hit the ground running in his manufacturing career. 

Portland (TN) Sun 

  • DeGeorge retires after 38 years of teaching in Sumner County: Beverly DeGeorge, a first-grade teacher at Portland Gateview Elementary School, is retiring after 38 years teaching in Sumner County. She will be remembered for her quiet and calm demeanor with her children and colleagues. She began her career at Hendersonville Elementary (now Gene Brown Elementary) in 1982 shortly after graduating from Western Kentucky University. 

April 13-28, 2022

Daily News 

  • WKU celebrates historic donation: Western Kentucky University on Friday commemorated Eva and Jim Martens’ philanthropic work after the school recently rededicated the alumni center in the couple’s honor. 
  • Philanthropist, businessman Bill Gatton dies: Carol Martin “Bill” Gatton, an academic philanthropist, businessman and longtime donor to Western Kentucky University and other institutions, died Monday. 
  • Duvall wins JA's Gold Leadership Award: Junior Achievement of South Central Kentucky longtime volunteer Monica Duvall is one of 10 recipients of the JA national organization’s Gold Leadership Award this year. Allie Sharp, president of the local JA office, said Duvall, director of student success at the Gordon Ford College of Business at Western Kentucky University, “helps southcentral Kentucky’s JA students get the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices.” 
  • WKU Commons at Helm Library opens to students, public: In April 2018, Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni announced a plan to renovate Helm Library and create an innovative, state-of-the-art meeting space. Nearly four years later, that plan is now a reality. 

WKU Public Radio 

WNKY-TV 

  • Throwback Thursday – The Bell Observatory: When the Space Race came to Bowling Green: Last summer, Western Kentucky University’s Bell Observatory received a National Science Foundation grant to replace its telescope and control system. The space race age had its impact on WKU and Warren County over 50 years ago. Did you know WKU has had an off-site radio observatory since the late 1960s? This is the story of the Bell Observatory. 
  • Locals spend a morning with law enforcement at Coffee with the Cops: While you were out getting your morning coffee, you may have seen Bowling Green Police, the Warren County Sheriff and the Kentucky State Police troopers at Starbucks on Campbell Lane. No, there was not an emergency. It was just the Coffee with the Cops! The event, organized by WKU Police, brought together the law enforcement agencies to meet and talk with residents. 
  • WKU Forensics Team wins NFA national championship: The Western Kentucky University Forensics Team has won the National Forensics Association National Tournament sweepstakes championship. 
  • Bill Gatton, namesake of WKU’s Gatton Academy, dies at 89: Carol Martin “Bill” Gatton, the businessman and philanthropist the Gatton program is named after, died on April 18, 2022, at 89 years old. 
  • WKU alum/employee races Boston Marathon: Bowling Green’s very own Western Kentucky University alumni and employee just finished up running the Boston Marathon today. 41-year-old Shanda Blair finished  her second ever Marathon today – the Boston Marathon and its extremely uphill trek. 
  • Local Parks and Rec leader writes book after late grandfather: Cameron Levis is known for being a leader in the Parks and Rec community for years and years. Now he’s taking that one step further by releasing his first ever children’s book about parks, called ‘Home Is Where Your Park Is’. His grandpa, Dr. Alton Little, passed away in September.  He was a professor at Western Kentucky University for 36 years, teaching recreation administration. 

WBKO-TV 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • MCHS sophomore chosen for Gatton Academy: Jack Smith, a sophomore at McLean County High School, is among three regional students who have been accepted into the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, which is on Western Kentucky University’s campus in Bowling Green. 
  • Two OHS students accepted to Gatton Academy: Two Owensboro High School students have been accepted to the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science Class of 2024. 

Lane Report 

WKDZ-FM, Cadiz 

London Sentinel-Echo 

Trimble Banner 

  • Giving back to his roots: Congleton selected for grant opportunity, chooses to benefit park: Trimble County’s Keegan Congleton has received one of ten microgrants worth $500 as part of Dr. Mody’s Make a Difference Microgrants Competition for students from the Summer Camp for Academically Talented Middle School Students (SCATS), the Summer Program for Verbally and Mathematically Precocious Youth (VAMPY) and the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Sciences in Kentucky. All of the programs are housed by Western Kentucky University. 

Wilson (TN) Post 

  • Mark Wooten of Lebanon High School named Wilson County Teacher of the Year: Lebanon High School teacher Mark Wooten was named the 2022 Wilson County Teacher of the Year at a banquet with the county’s other 32 top teachers at Cumberland University’s Baird Chapel last Friday. Wooten graduated from Western Kentucky University with a degree in education and a minor in industrial technology. 

Defense Visual Information Distribution Service 

  • History is made during change of command: The unit guidon representing an historic exchange of command was handed off to Army Capt. Taylor Davies as she assumed command of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 623rd Field Artillery Brigade in a ceremony Mar. 27. She studied biology and went through ROTC program at Western Kentucky University and after she graduated was commissioned as a Field Artillery Officer in December 2016.  

April 1-12, 2022

WKU Public Radio 

  • Bowling Green woman will run in Boston Marathon April 18: A woman from Bowling Green, Kentucky will run in the Boston Marathon on April 18. Shanda Blair is a graduate of Western Kentucky University, where she is currently director of operations for Aramark, the campus restaurant group. 

Daily News 

  • SKy Science Festival returns on April 23: The SKy Science Festival Expo Day will return to Bowling Green’s Circus Square Park after being postponed in 2020 and 2021 amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The Hilltoppers Astronomy Club will have special telescopes available to look at the sun, which work much like solar eclipse glasses, and an exhibit by WKU’s Hardin Planetarium will demonstrate light and reflections. 
  • WKU to receive $74 million for new business building: Grise Hall has long been where business students at Western Kentucky University called home, but another major shake-up for the ever-changing campus is now on the horizon. As part of the 2022-24 budget approved in the Kentucky General Assembly last week, WKU was allotted $74.4 million from the state to fund a new building for the university’s Gordon Ford College of Business. 
  • Inspired by late grandfather, local man writes children’s book: Cameron Levis tells everyone he is a “parks and rec kid.” In fact, he wears the title proudly as a badge of honor. So much so that the current Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department special populations instructor followed in the footsteps of his mother and grandfather and is now a parks and recreation professional. That family passion is centered on the work and life of his grandfather Dr. Alton Little. Little was a professor at Western Kentucky University for more than 36 years in the Recreation Administration Department.
  • Journalists discuss experiences with December tornadoes: Local, regional and national journalists gathered Thursday night as part of Western Kentucky University School of Media’s 2022 John B. Gaines Family Lecture Series to publicly discuss their coverage of December’s deadly tornadoes. 

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU Alum prepares for Boston Marathon: Shanda Blair got into running when she was in middle school when she spent the night with a friend who had cross country practice the next morning. She deceased to come along, and from there on, there were no stops on her track. Shanda ran in middle school, high school, and ran at Western Kentucky University with a scholarship. 
  • WKU’s Helm Library opens next Monday with all new renovations: Monday morning, Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni announced that the Commons library facility will finally open next Monday with huge new renovations.
  • WKU’s PCAL hosts spring festival in downtown BG: Downtown Bowling Green was alive with the sounds of music and laughter this weekend. On Saturday afternoon, WKU’s Potter College of Arts and Letters held the Spring Forward Festival in Fountain Square Park. 
  • WKU’s Dance Big Red raises over $83,000: Western Kentucky University’s Dance Big Red raised over $83,000 for Norton Children’s Hospital on Friday. 

WBKO-TV 

  • Funding approved for new WKU business building: Western Kentucky University has been approved to receive 74-million dollars from the Kentucky General Assembly. These funds will go towards relocating the Gordon Ford College of Business. 
  • Dance Big Red exceeds fundraising goal: On Friday, Dance Big Red was held in person, for the first time in two years. The 8th Annual Dance Big Red was held at Houchens Industries – L.T. Smith Stadium out of an abundance of caution. 

Lane Report 

  • $417,000 grant sustains research into phone-based substance use intervention: Dr. Jenni Teeters, assistant professor in Western Kentucky University’s Department of Psychological Sciences, has received a $417,056 grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse for her project on the evaluation of a mobile-phone based intervention aimed at reducing substance-impaired driving among young adults. 
  • 4 Years in, UK College of Medicine impacting Bowling Green Community: Creating a full-fledged regional campus was a process that took intensive planning and collaboration long before it opened. Dr. Cheever, UK Acting Provost Robert DiPaola, M.D., Acting Dean Charles Griffith, M.D., and many others played instrumental roles in building connections with community partners in western Kentucky, Med Center Health and Western Kentucky University, institutions that helped move the process forward. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Pippin named Sorgho Elementary principal: Marjie Pippin, assistant principal of Meadow Lands Elementary School since 2017, is moving across the county to become principal of Sorgho Elementary School on July 1. Pippin graduated from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor of science degree in elementary education and a master of science degree in elementary school counseling. She earned educational administration certifications in principalship from WKU in 2012. 
  • Wedding named new OPS director of special education: Carrie Wedding has been named the new Owensboro Public Schools director of special education, effective July 1. She also has two master’s degrees, one in special education and one in public administration, both from Western Kentucky University. 

WEHT-TV, Evansville, IN 

  • Sorgho Elementary has a new Princi-PAL: Children at Sorgho Elementary School will have a new pal in their new principal. Marjie Pippin was announced as the new principal at Sorgho at a special meeting of the SES School-based Decision Making Council. Pippin graduated from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor of science degree in elementary education and a master of science degree in elementary school counseling. She earned educational administration certifications in principalship at levels 1 and 2 from WKU in 2012. 

March 17-31, 2022

WKU Public Radio 

Daily News 

  • Gaines lecture panel to focus on December tornadoes: In its return from a two-year COVID-19 hiatus, the Western Kentucky University School of Media’s 2022 John B. Gaines Family Lecture Series will feature local and national journalists for a discussion centered on the December tornadoes. 
  • SOKY Book Fest's return welcomed: Charley’s enthusiasm was shared by many at the book fest that started with a children’s day Friday and concluded with a main event Saturday that featured more than 60 authors and illustrators meeting and greeting book lovers at the Knicely Conference Center. 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

March 2-16, 2022

The Parking Podcast 

EdSurge 

  • What It Takes to Recruit Future Teachers During the Pandemic: In the communities surrounding Western Kentucky University, rumors were circulating that teaching was just too tough a profession to enter. “It’s not necessarily actual data or actual information,” says Corinne Murphy, dean of the university’s College of Education and Behavioral Sciences. Instead, people were hearing stories that getting a teaching credential required “so many tests, so many rules, and too many barriers that it’s not worth it,” she adds. “We knew it is worth it.” 

Daily News 

  • Former WKU, Colts star Doyle distributes free shoes to students: After recently retiring from the NFL, former Western Kentucky University and Indianapolis Colts tight end Jack Doyle decided to visit and give back to students from Warren County Public Schools who were impacted by the Dec. 11 tornadoes. 
  • New poll shows majority of Kentuckians support sports betting: While some state legislators try for the fourth straight year to legalize sports betting in Kentucky, a new poll from Western Kentucky University showed a majority of Kentuckians support wagering on sports. 
  • Popular SoKy Book Fest returns: It’s been three years since the Southern Kentucky Book Fest brought dozens of acclaimed authors to Bowling Green, but to the joy of local literature lovers, the celebration is scheduled to return March 25-26. The festival is presented by Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Warren County Public Library and WKU Libraries and is free to the public. 
  • WKU Regents approve Alumni Center name change: The Western Kentucky University Augenstein Alumni Center will be renamed The Eva and Jim Martens Alumni Center in recognition of the couple’s $5 million commitment to benefit the center and WKU Athletics.

WKU Public Radio 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • School systems partnering to create principal cohort: Five area school districts are participating in a school leadership cohort that will enable each to help current employees earn administration certifications through Western Kentucky University. 
  • Thurman named next DCPS spokesperson: Hannah Thurman has been named the next public information officer for Daviess County Public Schools. Thurman has a bachelor of arts degree in advertising from Western Kentucky University, where she also earned a master’s degree in recreation and sport administration, with an emphasis in media and branding. She is currently working toward a doctor of education degree in educational leadership from WKU. 

WBKO-TV 

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU Police Department hiring dispatch and more: The WKU Police Department is looking for people to fill their communication officer positions. There are three of these open positions in dispatch right now. 
  • Throwback Thursday – Exploring the birthplace of modern civilization: Throwback Thursday this week takes us across the globe to the birthplace of human society. This new Kentucky Museum exhibit opened earlier this year and was curated with help from the Western Kentucky University History department. Titled “The Ancient Near East in Kentucky,” this exhibit focuses on the importance of writing in two ancient early civilizations, Egypt and Mesopotamia. 
  • Sunrise Spotlight – Women’s History Month at the Kentucky Museum: On Today’s Sunrise Spotlight brought to you by German American Bank, Dr. Christy Spurlock joins us in-studio to talk about the significance of Women’s History Month and some of the exhibits honoring women at the Kentucky Museum. 

WHAS-TV, Louisville 

  • Rick Guillaume, longtime BB&T CEO dies, family says: The family of Rick Guillaume told WHAS11 News he passed away peacefully on Friday at the age of 78, after battling multiple health issues for nearly a decade. Rick was a graduate of Shawnee High School class of 1961 and continued his education at Western Kentucky University graduating in 1965 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Hardin County gains a new 4-H Youth Development Agent: Hardin County Cooperative Extension Services has gained a new 4-H Youth Development Agent. Sue Ann McCandless, 42, will begin Monday as a 4-H agent after serving as a staff assistant at the extension service in LaRue County for 17 years. “I decided to try to lead by example and enrolled at Western Kentucky University to work towards my Bachelor’s,” she said. “I thought if I could show them mom can do it, then they‘d see that they could do it, too.” 
  • Group looking to pop top on COKE: It’s the model that’s been successful for 15 years in Bowling Green as KY Innovation Programs Directory Buddy Steen told the council. In his presentation, Steen said in the early years of operation for the WKU Innovation Campus, 16 companies returned $975,671 in tax revenue to the city of Bowling Green, who initially invested $50,000. 
  • A Kentucky Bard’s Tale: Robert Villanueva knew from an early age that he was meant to be a writer. He said he can remember writing everything from poems to short stories, even starting a novel his junior year of high school. He started submitting works for publication when he was 16 years old. Villanueva kept that passion as he grew and graduated from Western Kentucky University with a journalism degree. 

Somerset Commonwealth-Journal 

Midland (TX) Reporter-Telegram 

  • One man’s vision turned into major produced water conference: Originally interested in geology, Woodcock switched to economics in his junior year at Western Kentucky University. After graduating in 1964, he went to work for Xerox Corporation, holding various positions, including worldwide director of training for the office products division. He left Xerox in 1979 to purchase Hy-Bon Engineering, an engineering and compressor manufacturing firm that was purchased by Cimmaron Energy in 2019. 

MoneyGeek

  • Expert Advice: Finding Affordable Health Insurance: What are the pros and cons of buying health insurance plans with cheaper premiums? In the insurance world, insurance companies scrutinize all costs. They provide nothing for free so if one's premium is lower, then one is almost certainly receiving less of something. – Jonathan Handy, WKU Assistant Professor of Finance
  • Expert Advice: Finding Affordable Life Insurance: What factors affect the cost of life insurance? What does it mean to have cheap life insurance? Life insurance cost is primarily impacted by how likely the plan is to pay a death benefit and how large the death benefit is. – Jonathan Handy, WKU Assistant Professor of Finance

Feb. 15-March 1, 2022

WKU Public Radio 

Daily News 

  • Program honors Trailblazers in the making: The 25th annual Trailblazer Awards program, which was Sunday at State Street Baptist Church, went in a different direction by recognizing organizations that are mentoring local youths and young adults. The organizations that were honored included: WKU Young Male Leadership Academy, which was started in 2007 as a partnership between the state Department of Education and Western Kentucky University. 
  • WKU dedicates First Year Village with ribbon-cutting: Western Kentucky University leaders dreamed of the day when they could provide a transformative experience for first-year students. On Wednesday, they celebrated the realization of that dream.
  • WKU sees record retention from fall semester: Even amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Western Kentucky University announced a record retention rate among first-time, first-year students. 

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU’s Cherry Hall lights up to support Ukraine: Landmarks around the world are showing support for Ukraine amid Russia’s invasions. Western Kentucky University is showing their support by having one of its historical buildings lit up in Ukraine’s blue and yellow colors. 
  • Sunrise Spotlight – Dance Little Red: On today’s Sunrise Spotlight brought to you by German American Bank, Avery Yates and the Paynter family join us in-studio to discuss this year’s Dance Little Red and online auction benefitting Norton Children’s Hospital. 
  • Monday Motivator – WKU’s Living Learning Communities: There’s a new way to live as a freshman on the campus of WKU through the First Year Village. Students and faculty describe why it’s aiding student success and retention in this week’s Monday Motivator. 
  • WKU lifts mask mandate: Western Kentucky University lifted its mask mandate Friday. 
  • WKU dedicates First Year Village with ribbon cutting: An exciting day for the Western Kentucky University community! WKU celebrated its two newest residence halls and First Year Village with a ribbon cutting ceremony. 
  • WKU Mourns the Loss of the Star on Campus: WKU lost a vital helper over the weekend. Star, WKU’s Animal Assisted Therapy dog, lost her life on Saturday due to a sudden autoimmune crisis. 

WBKO-TV 

WFPL-FM, Louisville 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Spectrum News 1 

Kentucky Today 

Jan. 28-Feb. 14, 2022

Daily News 

  • Gatton Academy students included in $5 million gift to UK: The University of Kentucky announced Thursday that philanthropist Bill Gatton gifted the school $5 million in scholarship funding for current UK students and undergraduate students from his namesake Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science at Western Kentucky University. 
  • Editorial: Yates' memory lives on with lounge, scholarships: First Lt. Eric D. Yates dedicated his life to this country he loved so much, and in the end he gave his life for it. 
  • Capps remembered for 'wide-ranging influence' at WKU: Western Kentucky University has lost a trailblazing former faculty member and administrator whose influence on countless business and education leaders is still being felt. 
  • Shifts could bring more severe weather to area: Megan Schargorodski watched the Dec. 11 tornadoes that slammed Warren County and other parts of Kentucky with a bit more interest than most. As interim state climatologist and interim director of the Kentucky Climate Center and Kentucky Mesonet, Schargorodski perhaps wasn’t as surprised by the deadly tornadoes as many local residents were. 
  • Bowling Green's 'Running Man' remembered: To the people who spotted him jogging around town, dressed in his signature gym shorts to complete errands in every kind of weather – even in the snow – Jean-Claude Evard was the “Running Man of Bowling Green.” But Evard’s friends and colleagues at Western Kentucky University, where he taught math courses in a thick Swiss accent, knew him as the guy who didn’t drive or even have a license. 
  • WKU ROTC honors alumnus killed in Afghanistan: Every day, Kathy Yates does something to honor the memory of her late son, 1st Lt. Eric D. Yates, a 2008 Western Kentucky University graduate who was killed in action while in Afghanistan. 

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU students to work Special Olympics at Disney: A couple of lucky Western Kentucky University students are gearing up for Disney World and getting ready to cover the Special Olympic games. One WKU professor is already in Florida now. 
  • Throwback Thursday – Civil rights and education pioneer: the story of Frank O. Moxley: In observance of Black History Month, Throwback Thursday is sharing the inspirational story of Frank Otha Moxley, namesake of the F.O. Moxley Center. The first African American to earn a Master’s degree at WKU, former teacher, coach, and mentor, Moxley paved the way for African Americans in the Bowling Green community. 
  • WKU celebrates Black History Month; more events ahead: February first marks the start of Black History Month, and Western Kentucky University has plans to celebrate the month-long holiday. 
  • Monday Motivator – WKU Cheer Team: Last month, the Western Kentucky University cheer team went to the National Championship in Orlando, Florida. The Coed team took home first and the All-Girl team was runner up. We take a look at their wins in this week’s Monday Motivator. 
  • Sunrise Spotlight – US Bank Celebration of the Arts: On today’s Sunrise Spotlight brought to you by German American Bank, Brent Bjorkman with the Kentucky Museum joins us live in-studio to talk about this year’s Celebration of the Arts show presented by US Bank. 

WBKO-TV 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Editorial: WKU establishes key tool for schools: The employment shortfall shows few signs of going away. The nation’s schoolhouses are not immune. Western Kentucky University, which has trained generations of skilled educators, is trying to offer a solution. 
  • Partnership could lead to more certified teachers: Classified staff at Hardin County Schools might be given the opportunity soon to earn their teacher certification through Western Kentucky University. A partnership between WKU and the WKU College of Education and Behavioral Sciences with HCS is in the works to implement the “WKU Grow Your Own” program. 
  • Lucas named high school music teacher of the year: With about two years of experience as choir director and teacher at North Hardin High School, Cassie Lucas recently was honored for her work, and overcoming COVID-19 pandemic challenges. Lucas has been named the Kentucky Music Educators’ Association fourth district high school music teacher of the year. A graduate of Central Hardin high School, she attended Western Kentucky University where she received her bachelor’s in music education, and is currently finishing her master’s in music at WKU.  
  • First 'Gamechanger' award announced: The Legacy Foundation awarded the first Tanya Seabrooks Gamechanger Award to Donielle Heron-Lovell. Heron-Lovell, associate professor of sociology at Western Kentucky University, said she worked with Seabrooks for years in Hardin County on various committees and projects, and then became friends. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Southard fulfilling childhood aspiration: Growing up, Seth Southard always had his sights set on becoming the superintendent for Ohio County Schools. The Ohio County native began his career after graduating from Western Kentucky University in 1997 with degrees in chemistry and teaching. 
  • Working with students is the highlight for an educator: When Tommy Burrough graduated from Western Kentucky University, he wanted to teach and coach, and never imagined he would go into school administration, and eventually become the superintendent of McLean County Public Schools. 

Wallet Hub

  • Cities that Overspend on Cars: What are the most common mistakes people make when shopping for a car? --Ron A. Rhoades, Associate Professor, WKU

Jan. 11-27, 2022

WKU Public Radio 

Daily News 

WNKY-TV 

  • Emerging Leader – JT Troxell: JT Troxell has played a huge part in disaster recovery after the tornado. We hear about his efforts and personal journey in this week’s Emerging Leader. 
  • Hidden Heroes – Randy Lee: In this week’s Hidden Heroes, we head over to the campus of Western Kentucky University to feature a voice you probably know very well in the world of sports. 

Williamson (TN) Herald 

  • Famous local jazz musician ‘Beegie’ Adair dies at 84: World-renowned jazz pianist Bobbe Long “Beggie” Adair, a fixture of the local music scene who performed with music greats such as Dolly Parton and Vince Gill, passed away Sunday at her home in Franklin. She was 84. After graduating from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor’s degree in music, she spent three years as a music teacher before she moved to Nashville. 

NPR 

  • Bobbe 'Beegie' Long Adair, a formative center of Nashville's jazz scene, dies at 84: Pianist and bandleader Bobbe “Beegie” Long Adair’s impact and influence extended across the entire Nashville music community, but it particularly resonated among jazz fans and players there. Adair, who died in her Franklin, Tenn. home on Sunday at 84, was a master of melodic interpretation and embellishment, a superb soloist and tremendous accompanist who could fit smoothly into any situation and still deliver a distinctive sound. A Kentucky native and Western Kentucky University graduate with a B.S. in Music Education, Adair came to Nashville in 1961. As a session musician, she recorded with everyone from Dinah Shore and Peggy Lee to Ray Stevens, Steve Allen, Chet Atkins, Mama Cass Elliott, Vince Gill and Dolly Parton. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Health inspectors critical to community health: Ryan Christian, environmental health program manager for the Green River District Health Department, wears many hats as a health inspector. Christian has been in his position with GRDHD for about 14 years, having graduated from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor’s degree in occupational safety and health with a focus in public health. 

WHAS-TV, Louisville 

Dec, 9, 2021-Jan. 10, 2022

Daily News 

WKU Public Radio 

WBKO-TV 

WNKY-TV 

  • African American Museum hit by tornado then catches fire, items being salvaged: The African American Museum caught fire just one and a half weeks after having been hit by the December 11th tornado and is suffering the loss of several one-of-a-kind documents and other items. The recovered items were brought to WKU Supply Services Building by WKU facilities staff but they were laid out and saved by staff from the WKU KY Museum and Library. 
  • Course designed to prevent farmer suicides and depression: A Farmer’s job is never easy, but with factors like the pandemic and recent tornado, our farming community is susceptible to higher rates of depression, anxiety, and suicide. This is according to The Kentucky Department of Agriculture. To fight this, Western Kentucky University has developed a free course for healthcare professionals designed to prevent farmer suicides. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Colleges, universities largely maintaining COVID protocols: Colleges and universities in the county area are largely maintaining their COVID-19 protocols from last year for the spring 2022 semester, which is beginning for most of them. Officials from Western Kentucky University-Owensboro, Kentucky Wesleyan College, Brescia University and the Owensboro Community & Technical College say classes will all be in-person, but there are virtual and remote learning opportunities available should students need them. Their protocols for handling the omicron variant include masking in buildings and in crowds.
  • From Farm to Foodliner: Knott credits farm background for grocery business success: While studying business management at Western Kentucky University, Knott initially had intentions of owning his own restaurant and bar but found himself changing his path after graduation. 
  • Ag communities lacking in mental health services: Michele Mitchell, a family nurse practitioner in Hancock County, hopes to provide mental health services that specifically focus on the mental health needs of farmers and agricultural communities. Mitchell, a family nurse practitioner for around 10 years, is studying at Western Kentucky University to receive a certification as a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner, with a special focus on mental health in agricultural communities. 

Qatar Foundation 

WHAS-TV, Louisville 

WRBL-TV, Columbus, GA 

WALB-TV, Albany, GA 

Kentucky Ag Connection 

  • Free Farmer Mental Stress Course Available for Kentuckians: A free one-hour course, developed by Western Kentucky University, designed to aid healthcare professionals in acknowledging and lessening farmer suicides is now available, Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles announced. 

Nov. 24-Dec. 8, 2021

Daily News 

WKU Public Radio 

WNKY-TV 

  • Emerging Leader – Austin Bonebrake: Austin Bonebrake is a senior at Western Kentucky University who was just awarded a scholarship for geoscience students with disabilities. 
  • WKU Greek Life sponsors presents for 34 Christmas Angel kids: Members of Western Kentucky University Greek Life are working hard to give kids a special Christmas. Tuesday evening, many of the school’s fraternities and sororities wrapped gifts for 34 elementary school kids at Parker-Bennett-Curry Elementary. 
  • WKU hosts international students for a Thanksgiving meal: Western Kentucky University faculty and students spent a portion of their holiday week preparing a meal for international students to enjoy. 
  • Hidden Heroes – Corie Martin: Corie Martin went to Western Kentucky University and has always loved the Bowling Green community. Now she works to keep the community safe by providing health information to the public and working at Med Center Health. She’s this week’s Hidden Hero. 

WBKO-TV 

WTVQ-TV, Lexington 

Columbia Magazine 

Somerset Commonwealth Journal 

  • WKU, SCC team up for elementary ed. Program: Those in the Pulaski area looking to become an elementary school teacher have a brand new opportunity to earn their degree without having to travel too far from home. On Thursday, Somerset Community College (SCC) and Western Kentucky University (WKU) announced a new program through SCC’s University Center of Southern Kentucky (UCSK) to offer four-year bachelor degrees in elementary education. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

Portland (TN) Leader 

  • Portland resident awarded scholarship: Western Kentucky University senior Austin Bonebrake of Portland has been awarded an internationally-competitive scholarship for geoscience students with disabilities. 

London Sentinel-Echo 

WAVE-TV, Louisville 

  • WKU Geologist awarded Chinese Government Friendship Award: Western Kentucky University announced that a Geologist at the school has been awarded the Chinese Government Friendship Award, which is considered one of China’s highest awards for foreign experts doing work in the country. 

Nov. 12-23, 2021

Daily News 

WKU Public Radio 

Spectrum News 1 

WBKO-TV 

WNKY-TV 

  • Emerging Leader – Tribhuwan Singh: This week’s Emerging Leader is Tribhuwan Singh, a Finance and Business Analytics double-major at Western Kentucky University. 
  • WKU geologist wins China’s highest award given to foreign experts: China’s Ministry of Science and Technology has announced that University Distinguished Professor of Hydrogeology Chris Groves of Western Kentucky University’s Department of Earth, Environmental, and Atmospheric Sciences has won the Chinese Government Friendship Award, which is the People’s Republic of China’s highest award for “foreign experts who have made outstanding contributions to the country’s economic and social progress.” 
  • Glasgow teacher inducted into the Kentucky Teacher’s Hall of Fame: Western Kentucky University is the home of the Kentucky Teachers Hall of Fame. Friday, four new members were added to that distinguished list. 
  • Feel Good Friday – Olivia Miller: WKU sophomore Olivia Miller battled a life threatening medical condition in her early years. Now, she’s living her best life, and has been inspired to study healthcare so she can save others as well. 
  • Gov. Beshear visits WKU SmartHolstein Lab: Thursday evening Gov. Andy Beshear was at Western Kentucky University visiting the SmartHolstein Lab. 
  • Pets impact emotional and physical health: WKU psychology professor Rick Grieve said pets can help people struggling with mental health issues. 
  • Emerging Leader – Abi Canter: Abi Canter is a senior at Western Kentucky University, the Chapter President of Alpha Delta Pi, and serves with a variety of other organizations on the Hill. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Crawford provides analysis, mentorship: Although he is only 22, Brady Crawford of Elizabethtown already is making great strides in professional development and is serving as a mentor to those on similar paths. An Elizabethtown native and 2017 graduate of Elizabethtown High School, Crawford went on to earn an associate’s degree from Elizabethtown Community and Technical College and earned a bachelor’s degree in business data analytics from Western Kentucky University in 2020. 
  • Burba looks forward to a career in helping others: Maddy Burba is studying nursing in high school to help in her future career. A Central Hardin High School, Burba, 18, is in the health science pathway at the Early College and Career Center currently in a phlebotomy class and she received her CNA certification last year. She’s planning to go to Western Kentucky University for nursing school. 

Lexington Herald-Leader 

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association 

Oct. 26-Nov. 11, 2021

WKU Public Radio 

Spectrum News 1 

  • Longtime artists prepare for the return of the World’s Greatest Studio Tour: Longtime artist like Terry Wilson are preparing for the return of the The World's Greatest Studio tour after a year off. Wilson now retired, previously worked for Western Kentucky University as a professor. He now is in his seventh year painting and after a year off due to COVID-19 is excited about the return. 

Daily News 

  • Kentucky Museum’s ‘Christmas in Kentucky’ set to return: After last year’s event was canceled due to COVID-19, Western Kentucky University’s Kentucky Museum will host its 15th Christmas in Kentucky celebration free for the public next month. 
  • WKU's enrollment dips again this fall amid pandemic: Western Kentucky University’s enrollment for full-time equivalent students is down again this year, signaling that – despite the university’s best efforts to recruit students – it isn’t exempt from a national decline in college enrollment that’s been turbocharged by the pandemic. 
  • WKU making strides with LGBTQ inclusion: Through a campuswide effort, Western Kentucky University has gone up on the national Campus Pride Index with a new official rating of 4.5 stars out of 5, the university announced Wednesday. 
  • WKU marks passing of ardent donor, Pete Mahurin: Pete Mahurin – a longtime supporter of Western Kentucky University, champion of gifted education and a namesake of the university’s Honors College – died Wednesday. He was 83. 
  • WKU showcases adaptive athletics offerings: Western Kentucky University student Drew Brumfield got a fresh perspective on a classic sport Sunday as he participated in an adaptive athletics showcase at the campus’ Preston Center. 

WNKY-TV 

  • WKU is working to prepare students for careers: Western Kentucky University Gordon Ford College of Business is working with students this week to prepare them for life after graduation. 
  • Hidden Heroes – Jace Lux: Jace Lux has been at Western Kentucky University for two decades. First as a student, then as an educator and now as a leader. He’s this week’s Hidden Hero. 
  • Emerging Leader – Blake Barker: Blake Barker is a senior at Western Kentucky University who started a mentorship program with his friends to encourage bridging the gap between freshmen and upperclassmen, as the new students transition to life on the Hill. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Hartford native's cancer bout inspires nursing dreams: Olivia Miller, a Hartford native and soon-to-be nursing student at WKU, hopes to inspire hope in others with her cancer survival journey. Miller, a sophomore at WKU, said she will be starting in the school’s nursing program next semester, which has been a dream of hers for some time. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Miss Kentucky visits includes talk of goal setting: Wheeler graduated with her master’s degree in speech pathology in May from Western Kentucky University, a major that she was inspired to study because of her great-grandfather’s illness. 
  • Cubbage displays compassion for children through CASA role: Through her role with CASA of the Heartland, Natalie Cubbage of Leitchfield has made it a full-time mission to help at-risk children in the community. A 2010 graduate of Grayson County High School, Cubbage earned her bachelor’s degree in social work in 2014 from Western Kentucky University. 
  • Realtor recognized for 50 years in industry: Marilyn McLane has been in the real estate business for 50 years and was recognized for the feat Monday during the Heart of Kentucky Association of Realtors’ luncheon held at American Legion Hardin Post 113 in Elizabethtown. Marilyn and her husband, Hardin McLane, together have accrued a total of 112 years in the real estate business. The two, who have been married 62 years, met while attending Western Kentucky University. 

WBKR-FM, Owensboro 

Think Advisor 

  • Social Media Star Kyla Scanlon Is Making Finance Fun: Kyla Scanlon, 24, is determined to reshape financial education. The innovative, entertaining content creator, who began trading options at age 16, has a platform in the works she describes as “a financial playground.”. From Kentucky, she was schooled in gifted classes and at Western Kentucky University majored in finance, economics and data analytics. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 2019. 

Paintsville Herald 

  • Paintsville Tourism welcomes new director: As a person with a lifelong love for Eastern Kentucky, new Paintsville Tourism Executive Director Chesi Arnett said she has spent most of her adult life following the path of education for the sake of pursuing this exact position, which she called her “dream job,” adding that she wanted to share her love of Johnson County and Paintsville with the world. “So, I went to Western Kentucky University and I double majored in Communications and Tourism, and my whole goal was to one day be Paintsville Tourism director,” Arnett said. 

WalletHub

  • What makes a good sports city?: This is a tough question, and it will really depend on the person you are talking to. For me, what makes a good sports city is having a dedicated fan base that will support the team through good and bad times. – Dr. W. Andrew Czekanski, Assistant Professor, WKU’s School of Kinesiology, Recreation & Sport

Oct. 9-25, 2021

Daily News 

Spectrum News 1 

WBKO-TV 

WNKY-TV 

National Geographic 

  • Why animals developed four types of skeletons: Flying fish are known for their spectacular acrobatics, bursting through the ocean’s surface and sailing in the air as long as 3,000 feet. Why fly? To avoid predators. They’re “basically marine popcorn,” says Steve Huskey, a biologist at Western Kentucky University and author of The Skeleton Revealed. "Everybody eats them.” 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Storey fulfills dreams of entrepreneurship: Throughout her life, Lisa Storey of Vine Grove has held many different roles, including positions in the fields of health care and education. Now, she is primarily focused on entrepreneurship, a pursuit she has almost always been interested in. She  holds a bachelor’s degree in biology with an emphasis on pre-medicine from Western Kentucky University and later went on to earn a master’s degree in middle grade education from WKU. 

WEHT-TV, Evansville/Henderson 

Mountain Advocate, Barbourville 

  • Clouse to be formally inducted in to hall of fame: Wanda Carol Clouse, 2020 Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame inductee will be formally inducted on November 19 along with this year’s honorees. Last year’s ceremony was not held due to Covid-19. The ceremony will take place on the campus of Western Kentucky University. 

WCLU-FM, Glasgow 

Wallet Hub

  • Guaranteed Approval Credit Cards: Is it possible for a credit card to truly guarantee approval? Generally speaking “Guaranteed Approval” should be interpreted as minimal requirements necessary for approval. -- Jonathan Handy, Assistant Professor, WKU

Oct. 2-8, 2021

Spectrum News 1 

WKU Public Radio 

WBKO-TV 

  • First Augmented Reality Gallery at WKU: The first Augmented Reality Gallery on Western Kentucky University’s campus is at the Fine Arts Center from October 3 through October 9. 
  • National Coffee with a Cop Day at WKU: The Western Kentucky Police Department celebrates National Coffee with a Cop Day by going to the on-campus Starbucks to share a ‘cup of joe’ with students.

WNKY-TV 

  • Local entrepreneurs share success stories in spite of pandemic: Since the start of the pandemic, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center says they’ve had many new people asking to be mentored about how to start up a business. At Western Kentucky University’s Research and Development Center, one entrepreneur’s business was turned to dust overnight during the pandemic. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Louisville Courier Journal 

  • Tour 17 Kentucky locations that inspired filmmaker John Carpenter as he wrote 'Halloween': It's been more than 40 years since one of the most iconic horror movies ever made hit movie theaters. "Halloween" scared the bejeebers out of teenage babysitters and went on to launch a pretty cool driving tour in Bowling Green, Kentucky. You can add an element of realism to your Halloween season with a day trip to Bowling Green to see the place that inspired famed filmmaker John Carpenter as he wrote his scary movie franchise. 

Louisville Business Journal 

Murfreesboro (TN) Post 

  • Olt joins farm credit office: Amy Olt has been hired as a financial officer for the Farm Credit Mid-America office in Murfreesboro. Olt, a Greenburg, Ky., native, earned a bachelor’s degree in agriculture education and a master’s degree in animal science and agriculture education from Western Kentucky University. 

Lewiston (ID) Tribune 

  • From field to feast: Jed Conklin, a freelance photographer, real estate entrepreneur and restaurant owner recently of Spokane, doesn’t recall a time when he wasn’t a hunter or angler. In college Conklin was known as a sort of provider who would share his deer, ducks and other game with fellow journalism students and his instructors at Western Kentucky University. 

Sept. 21-Oct. 1, 2021

Daily News 

  • $1.4M grant will support WKU's outreach to adult learners: A $1.4 million grant awarded to Western Kentucky University will support 1,000 adult learners throughout the region as they navigate their higher education journey. 
  • WKU cuts ribbon on new program for adults with autism: Former Western Kentucky University President Gary Ransdell and his wife, Julie, shared an earnest moment of gratitude Thursday when they celebrated the opening of the new Julie and Gary Ransdell Living and Learning Community at LifeWorks – a WKU program for adults with autism. 
  • WKU professor tackles alleged media bias in new book: What drives the perception among many U.S. political conservatives that the news media largely skew left? It’s a thorny question that Rich Shumate, a professor in Western Kentucky University’s School of Media, aims to unravel in his new book, “Barry Goldwater, Distrust in Media, and Conservative Identity: The Perception of Liberal Bias in the News,” published by Lexington Books. 

WNKY-TV 

WBKO-TV 

  • WKU Police follow leads in several bike thefts: WKU students are back on campus, but studying and getting to class are not the only things they have to worry about. WKU has also seen an increase in bike thefts. 
  • WKU students fill-in as long term substitute teachers amid pandemic: Last month, the Kentucky Educational Standards Board approved a waiver to allow education majors who are eligible to serve as long-term substitute teachers, or emergency substitute teachers in place of their student teaching requirement. Rockfield Elementary currently has three WKU students serving as long-term substitute teachers in various departments.
  • WKU and BGPR partner to start adaptive sports program: Bowling Green Parks and Recreation is teaming up with Western Kentucky University to bring an adaptive sports program to the hill. BGPR and WKU graduate student Cameron Levis came up with the idea to give students with disabilities the opportunity to play sports. 

Cherokee Phoenix, Tahlequah, OK 

  • Meyer-Thornton selected as Native American Journalists Association Fellow: After his selection as a Native American Journalists Association Fellow, a Cherokee Nation citizen is putting together his associated project and looking forward to a career that includes coverage of Native issues and subjects. Zane Meyer-Thornton, a Western Kentucky University student, was one of six chosen by NAJA for its 2021 Native American Journalism Fellowship who are working in their respective projects during the fall term under mentors. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • OPS 'growing" seven teachers from current employees: Owensboro Public Schools is moving forward with growing its own teachers from current employees. Now, thanks to two grants, it will be able to help fund all seven applicants of the first Grow Your Own class. Scholarships for two of the employees will be provided by the Hager Foundation and the Marilyn and William Young Foundation. The scholarships will fund half of the program’s total cost, and Western Kentucky University has discounted the rate for all seven participants as part of the partnership for the Grow Your Own program. 

WFIE-TV, Evansville 

  • OPS announces ‘Grow Your Own’ scholarship recipients: Owensboro Public Schools announced “Grow Your Own” scholarship winners on Tuesday. The school district was awarded a $50,000 grant from the Kentucky Department of Education that was used for students to get education classes through Western Kentucky University. 

Lane Report 

  • Louisville Bar Association welcomes Miller as new executive director: After a national search, the Louisville Bar Association (LBA) has named Louisville native Kristen Miller the organization’s next executive director, effective November 8. A graduate of Western Kentucky University and the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, Kristen Miller brings experience from the healthcare, legal, nonprofit, and government sectors. 

Dayton (OH) Daily News 

  • Jim Gaines to lead statehouse coverage: Jim Gaines has begun work as the statehouse bureau chief for the Dayton Daily News, Springfield News-Sun and Journal-News newspapers. Gaines, 52, is originally from Michigan but has lived about half his life in Kentucky. He is a graduate of Western Kentucky University with a bachelor’s degree in history and government, and a subsequent bachelor’s in journalism. 

Nashville (TN) Ledger 

  • Rue joins Patterson Intellectual Property Law: Patterson Intellectual Property Law has added David Rue as the firm’s chief operating officer. Rue, an attorney, entrepreneur and law firm strategist, will focus on the firm’s operations and strategic development. Rue is a graduate of Western Kentucky University and the J. David Rosenberg College of Law at the University of Kentucky. 

Campus Rec Magazine 

PRWeb 

  • HerdDogg Joins WKU SmartHolstein Project to Accelerate Data Collection and Analysis for Landmark Genetic Study: HerdDogg, the agtech innovator that creates more value for producers’ livestock, has joined the WKU SmartHolstein Lab program to equip scientists with real-time animal biometric data that is critical to understanding dairy cow health and wellbeing. The WKU SmartHolstein Lab is a strategic, synergistic partnership between Holstein Association USA and Western Kentucky University Department of Agriculture and Food Science. Its mission is to lead Holstein and dairy advancements through research, development, and outreach in technologies, analytics, and genetics. 

Sept. 4-20, 2021

WKU Public Radio 

  • Local Research Study Confirms COVID-19 Vaccine Safety: New research suggests side-effects from the COVID-19 vaccine among south central Kentucky residents mirror the results of clinical trials conducted last year. A project by Bowling Green-based Med Center Health, Western Kentucky University, and the University of Kentucky College of Medicine - Bowling Green Campus was conducted through the Western Kentucky Heart and Lung/Med Center Health Research Foundation. 
  • The African American Folklorist: Preserving Black Bowling Green Through Art: In 1956, Margaret Munday became the first African American student to enroll at Western Kentucky University. She graduated in 1960. Today, Northeast Hall on the school's campus has been renamed Munday Hall in honor of Margaret and her many achievements. 

Daily News 

  • SBDC again providing in-person counseling: Yates and Kors have offices in Western Kentucky University’s Center for Research and Development at Nashville Road and Campbell Lane. Meetings there can be important for the new businesses and potential startups that Yates said make up about 80% of their clients. 
  • Daughter finds father’s missing WWII foot locker after 77 years: Velda Alexander never met her father, Johnnie Elmore, who was killed in action during World War II. But a recent discovery finally connected her with the hero she always wanted to meet. Elmore graduated from Western Kentucky University, where he was a member of the ROTC. He later taught ROTC at Indiana University in Bloomington. He was 31 years old when he was killed in action. 
  • Local research survey: COVID vaccines are safe: A research project from Med Center Health, Western Kentucky University and the UK College of Medicine’s Bowling Green campus found COVID-19 vaccines were safe and closely mirrored results found in clinical trials. 
  • WKU names first lotto winners in vaccine incentive program: Western Kentucky University held the first of several lottery drawings for students and staff who’ve received the coronavirus vaccine, doling out scholarships and cash prizes to winners. 
  • Bowling Green residents past and present share 9/11 experiences: Elsewhere, Western Kentucky University professor James Kenney had just walked into work and was immediately met by several of his photojournalism students. In the immediate aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center, Kenney said about 20 students had no hesitation in making the decision to travel to New York City. 
  • New adaptive sports program coming to WKU: There are fewer than 30 collegiate adaptive sports programs in the country, but Western Kentucky University will join that group this fall. Thanks to a partnership between the Bowling Green Parks & Recreation Department and WKU Campus Recreation and Wellness, the university will roll out its first sports program for students of all abilities Oct. 24. 
  • Nursing student urges vaccination amid delta surge: Between caring for COVID-19 patients, administering vaccinations, testing for the coronavirus and notifying the infected, local nursing student Andi Barefoot has received a master class in public health. “I’ve gotten a good grasp on what the pandemic holds,” said Barefoot, who is in her final semester at Western Kentucky University’s nursing program. 

WNKY-TV 

  • Runners raise money for scholarship in honor of fallen soldier: A 5k run took place Wednesday at Chaney’s Dairy Barn in Warren County in memorial of a soldier who was killed in the line of duty back in 2010. Eric Yates Memorial 5K is held annually to raise money for the 1st Lt. Eric Yates Memorial Scholarship Fund. 
  • Voices of Honor – Fred Alcott: After graduating from WKU in 1963 with a degree in agriculture, Fred Alcott was drafted into the army. He went to the navy instead, learned to fly helicopters, and searched for soviet submarines during the cold war. 
  • WKU awards prizes for vaccinated: Western Kentucky University has a new way of rewarding people for getting their Covid vaccines. 
  • A.G. Daniel Cameron hosts Search Warrant Task Force at WKU: Tuesday, Attorney General Daniel Cameron and the rest of the Search Warrant Task Force in the state held a meeting at Western Kentucky University to continue work on identifying ways to request, serve and carry out search warrants in the safest and most effective way possible. 
  • Flora’s Hidden Heroes – Thomas Weakley: Thomas Weakley has been a Western Kentucky University professor and campus pastor for decades, working to change the University for the better. He’s this week’s Flora’s Hidden Hero. 
  • Sunrise Spotlight – Adaptive Sports @ WKU: On Today’s Sunrise Spotlight, Cameron Levis and Maddie Duncan join us live in-studio to talk about the Adaptive sports program, a joint effort between Bowling Green Parks & Recreation and Western Kentucky University. 

WBKO-TV 

  • Gatton Academy Seniors set new record of National Merit Semifinalists: 26 seniors from The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition, breaking the 2019 record of the most students recognized in a single school year in the program’s history. 
  • Attorney General’s Search Warrant Task Force meets in Bowling Green: Back in January, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the formation of a search warrant task force. On Tuesday, the task force was able to meet on Western’s Campus, where they asked questions and also discussed moving forward. 
  • Charles Forrester art exhibition opens at Downing Museum: Charles Forrester was a gifted sculptor and artist whose artwork spanned six decades. An exhibit featuring his work opens September 14 at the Downing Museum at Baker Arboretum. Forrester taught art classes at Western Kentucky University and started the sculpture program at WKU. He passed away in 2010. 
  • Local study confirms COVID-19 vaccine safety: A research project between Med Center Health, Western Kentucky University, and the UK College of Medicine- Bowling Green Campus was conducted through the Western Kentucky Heart and Lung/Med Center Health Research Foundation. 
  • Med Center Health research project highlights vaccine safety, side effects: Dr. Doug McElroy, a biology professor at WKU says the most important step to the research was asking the correct questions. “Really critical in ensuring that we had a well crafted and reliable survey so that we could believe the results. And you know, obviously, that’s pretty critical as well,” said McElroy. 

Spectrum News 1 

  • Reclaiming the stage: Fine arts teacher hopeful for return of theater: Over the past 12 months, the theater industry has endured closed doors, empty seats and virtual shows. The profound impact of the pandemic has been felt by many, including performers and teachers like Austin Vahle who teaches at Brenda Cowan Elementary (BCE) School. Vahle is a two time Western Kentucky University alum who, after he applied for one job teaching theater at BCE, began making a realization that would change his life. 
  • Students in WKU game design program look to enter the growing industry: Western Kentucky University's game design program is giving students like Natashja Gentry the resources to jump right into the gaming world. 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Two ODT alums dance professionally: Cherokee Bennett and Abby Palmiter both started dancing at Joy Johnson’s Dance Studio when they were 3 years old. Bennett graduated from Western Kentucky University with a bachelor degree in dance in 2019. Palmiter is a 2021 graduate of WKU, also holding a dance degree. 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Powell uses farm, education lessons in life: Darrin Powell has brought education and farming together to shape his career. He’s currently the interim chief academic officer at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, working in various roles at the school for 22 years. He got his teacher certification in mathematics and computer programming at Western Kentucky University. 

Owensboro Times 

  • Three local students named National Merit semifinalists: Local students Catherine Elizabeth Wright, Dylan Mather, and Hunter Wimsatt have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition. Wright attends Apollo High School, and Mather attends Owensboro High School. Wimsatt attends The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky but is still considered a student at Owensboro Catholic High School. 

Frankfort State-Journal 

  • Gatton Academy seniors set new record of National Merit Semifinalists: Twenty-six seniors from The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition, breaking the 2019 record of the most students recognized in a single school year in the program’s history. Included in the twenty-six seniors are Marcus Negron and Anish Penmecha, both of Western Hills. 

Lane Report 

  • Appointments to Kentucky Boards and Commissions: Gov. Andy Beshear has reappointed Melanie Eaton to the Kentucky Board of Licensure for Long-Term Care Administrators. Eaton of Adairville is an instructor at Western Kentucky University and shall serve for a term expiring Jan. 12, 2025. 
  • C2 Strategic Communications hires Thomas George as senior director: Thomas George, a distinguished trailblazing journalist, and Kentucky native will join C2 Strategic Communications as a senior director next month, focusing on attracting new clients and diverse talent to the regional public relations firm. George, a Western Kentucky University graduate, was inducted into WKU’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. 
  • Appointments to Kentucky Boards and Commissions: Gov. Andy Beshear appointed the following as members of the Reading Diagnostic and Intervention Grant Steering Committee: Nancy Hulan of Bowling Green is a professor at Western Kentucky University and shall serve for a term expiring Sept. 1, 2022. 

WTVQ-TV, Lexington 

  • Five from region at Gatton are Merit Semifinalists: Twenty-six seniors from The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Bowling Green, Ky., have been recognized as semifinalists in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Competition, breaking the 2019 record of the most students recognized in a single school year in the program’s history. The list includes five students from Eastern Kentucky. 


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 Last Modified 9/28/22