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WKU in the News


Here is a selection of recent news stories about WKU:

June 11-July 9, 2024

Daily News

  • Bowling Green native Lt. Gen. Basham reflects on service: Steven Basham always wanted to fly. Now, the three-star lieutenant general and deputy commander of U.S. European Command and Bowling Green native will have time to do just that as he is set to retire this year and return to his hometown at the beginning of August. The 1983 graduate of Bowling Green High School attended Western Kentucky University, where he got a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering technology in 1987.
  • 'Mr. Western' leaves behind tears, great impact on the Hill: The day had to arrive sometime, a day that darkens the Western Kentucky University hallways, athletic fields and the region. "Mr. Western" Lee Robertson passed away Wednesday at age 102, a member of "The Greatest Generation."
  • 'He was a legend;' Lee Robertson, 'Mr. Western,' dies at 102: Lee Robertson, the World War II veteran who became known around southcentral Kentucky and Western Kentucky University as “Mr. Western,” died early Wednesday morning at the age of 102.
  • Wilson to lead regional tech council: As Siri or ChatGPT would surely tell you, the future of pervasive tech is here, and you’d better get on board. That’s exactly what a new partnership between the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce and Western Kentucky University’s Innovation Campus is designed to do. Created earlier this year, the Regional Technology Council based at the Innovation Campus is gaining steam under the leadership of volunteer Director Rob Wilson.
  • 'This opened my eyes': Local teens learn science lessons from MIT students: Working a 3-D printer, extracting DNA from a strawberry, and creating a concrete shark. Those are just some of the learning experiences Hatley McPherson will be able to share about her summer when she starts her eighth grade year at South Warren Middle School this fall. McPherson was among 45 local middle school-age students who took part in an unusual learning festival Friday at the Western Kentucky University Innovation Campus.
  • Coker now leading KY Center for Leadership: Greg Coker has come full circle. Now he’s looking to broaden that circle across the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Coker, a Franklin native and a protege of Kentucky Center for Leadership co-founder Randall Capps, was selected in May as the new president and CEO of that nonprofit that Capps and Cecile Garmon founded in 2020 as a vehicle for leadership development throughout Kentucky. Coker studied speech communication and psychology as an undergraduate at WKU and later earned a master’s degree in organizational communications.
  • Holley expanding presence at Innovation Campus: In a move aimed at boosting both Bowling Green-based Holley Performance Products and the Western Kentucky University Innovation Campus, Holley is moving more of its corporate functions from its Russellville Road headquarters to the campus on Nashville Road.

WNKY-TV

  • Bike4ALZ makes stop in Bowling Green on cross country tour: A group of Western Kentucky University students made their way back to Bowling Green after biking across the country for a good cause.
  • Community remembers impact of Mr. Western: An iconic figure in the Bowling Green community and campus of Western Kentucky University, Lee Robertson, better known as Mr. Western, is being remembered Wednesday after passing away at the age of 102 this morning.
  • WKU VAMPY celebrates 40 summers: The WKU Center for Gifted Studies is celebrating forty summers of the VAMPY program.
  • Center For Gifted Studies educating teachers with AP Summer Institute: On the campus of Western Kentucky University, the Center for Gifted Studies is preparing high school teachers to teach AP courses at their high schools across the country.
  • WNKY News 40 Weather Report: Tornado risks shift east: A trend that’s been studied over the last few decades shows that there has been an increasing number of severe storm events across the southeast. What does this mean for our area? News 40 Meteorologist Darius Mack spoke with Dr. Greg Goodrich, associate professor at Western Kentucky University about the latest trends.
  • Letitia Hughes named principal of Barren County High School: Letitia Hughes has been announced as the new principal of Barren County High School. She is a graduate of Western Kentucky University, where the district says she earned a bachelor’s degree in middle grades education with a minor in agriculture, a master’s in middle grades education and a rank I in educational leadership.
  • MIT cross-country bike riders stop in Bowling Green, share knowledge of STEM: One group of MIT students and graduates are biking across the country sharing their knowledge and love for STEM with children along the way. The students stopped by the Western Kentucky University Innovation Center and partnered with AccelerateKY to give the kids the opportunity to learn.
  • Bowling Green community mourns the loss of philanthropist Denny Wedge: Bowling Green is mourning the loss of a major figure in the philanthropic community. Paul Wedge, better known as Denny, passed away Thursday at the age of 85. Denny was an avid donor in the Bowling Green community, including to Western Kentucky University, where the athletic advising center is named after him and his wife Carol.
  • Center for Gifted Studies Celebrates 42nd SCATS Camp: The Center for Gifted Studies on the campus of WKU just wrapped up its 42nd year of the Summer Camp for Academically Talented Students. The camp, which included 130 students from Kentucky and 7 different states, hosted 19 different classes and activities.
  • Barren County Schools announce new Director of Special Programs: The Barren County Board of Education announced Christa Middleton as its new Director of Special Programs on Monday. Middleton attended Western Kentucky University, where she earned her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (2003), Master of Arts in Education for Learning and Behavior Disorders (2006), Rank 1 Certification for Director of Special Education (2019), and Level I Principal Certification (2020).

WBKO-TV

  • BIKE4ALZ stops in Bowling Green during coast-to-coast ride for Alzheimer’s Disease: Founded in 2010 by WKU student Tyler Jury to honor his grandfather, BIKE4ALZ is a summer-long, cross-country bike ride undertaken by a team of WKU students each year. During the ride, the cyclists host fundraising events, volunteer at senior living facilities, and spread awareness of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is the 12th team to take this 3,600-mile journey. Today is a homecoming for the group as they stop in Bowling Green before continuing to the next town.
  • Lee Robertson, known as ‘Mr. Western,’ dead at 102: After over half a century of service to Western Kentucky University Lee Robertson, also known as “Mr. Western,” has passed away at 102 years old. Robertson passed away early Wednesday morning in his home, according to multiple sources.
  • New Barren County High School principal announced: On Monday morning, Barren County High School announced their newest principal, Letitia Hughes. She is also a WKU graduate, earning a Bachelor’s degree in Middle Grades Education with a minor in Agriculture, a Master’s in Middle Grades Education and a Rank I in Educational Leadership.
  • Summer Weather Safety Week: WKU returns from Central Plains: Western Kentucky University, one of the bigger universities across the Commonwealth, offers a nationally known meteorology program. Every year, a group of students within the program venture across America into the Central Plains to follow storms.
  • Hughes & Coleman Hometown Hero: Leisa Hutchison: Leisa Hutchison is a speech language pathologist serving as Director of the Family Resource Program at WKU’s Suzanne Vitale Clinical Education Complex. She earned the nickname “Snow White” by her colleagues due to her kindness, helpfulness, and sense of joy.

Spectrum News 1

  • Cross country cycling team rides for a cause: A group of bike riders have been traveling across the country to raise awareness for Alzheimer’s disease. After biking across the country, averaging 14 mph, day in and day out, 12 cyclists from Western Kentucky University traveled through their old stomping grounds.

WKU Public Radio

WDRB-TV, Louisville

  • Louisville entrepreneur bringing educational opportunities to her home village in Uganda: A Louisville business owner is bringing educational opportunities to her home village in Uganda. Sarah Kimeu grew up in Bwoga, a small village in the western part of Uganda. As a girl, Sarah would run to and from school. That developed skill helped her earn an athletic and academic scholarship at Western Kentucky University and come to the United States.
  • Big Red visits wedding reception after 2 WDRB employees get married: A very special guest celebrated at a wedding reception after two WDRB employees tied the knot. Big Red, the Western Kentucky University mascot, hit the dance floor at a wedding reception in Louisville on Saturday evening. The wedding reception was for WDRB Mornings producer Jeanna Kleine-Kracht and photojournalist Ian Burkhead Cunningham.

WEVV-TV, Evansville, IN

  • New Principal announced for Daviess County High School: Daviess County Public Schools announces Jeff Wethington has been named the next principal of Daviess County High School. He earned his Master of Arts in Educational Administration from Western Kentucky University in 2009.

WEHT-TV, Evansville, IN

Ad Age

  • 21 summer ad interns you should know about: It’s officially summer, and ad agencies have brought on promising new talent in summer interns. Quinton Campbell, a native of China and student at Western Kentucky University and National Taiwan University, is interning at independent agency Doe-Anderson, which is based in Louisville, Kentucky and Columbus, Ohio.

May 30-June 10, 2024

WKU Public Radio

  • WKU program prepares high schoolers as first-generation college students: A Western Kentucky University program is making it easier for high school students to get to college as a first-generation student. WKU's F1st-Gen On the Hill is a program that offers resources and scholarship opportunities to first generation students. A first generation student attending college who comes from a family where the parents or guardians have not completed a 4-year college degree.

Kentucky NSF EPSCoR

Daily News

  • Registration now open for Med Center Health 10K Classic: The Med Center Health 10K Classic is still a few months away, but registration is now open for those interested in lacing up their running shoes and hitting the pavement. In its 45th year, the race will be held Sept. 14, beginning on Western Kentucky University’s campus, winding through downtown Bowling Green, and ending on Western’s campus.
  • Pride appointed to Omicron Delta Kappa Board of Trustees: Charles “Charley” L. Pride, director of student activities at Western Kentucky University, was recently appointed to the board of trustees for the Omicron Delta Kappa Society and Educational Foundation Inc.
  • Workshop seeks participants to shape county's future: The BG2050 initiative, spearheaded by county officials and organized by Suspenders of Disbelief and Innovation Engine, will host a 2050 Civic Imagination Living Lab to design a communication campaign for the project. The workshop will be held at WKU’s Center for Research and Development, 2413 Nashville Road, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 14-15 beginning with introductions.
  • Top Kentucky senators talk leadership at WKU lunch: A pair of Kentucky state senators gave some insight into their leadership Thursday at a southcentral Kentucky event. The executive luncheon, hosted by the Kentucky Center for Leadership, took place at the Western Kentucky University Alumni Center.

WNKY-TV

WBKO-TV

May 8-29, 2024

Daily News

  • WKU honors 10 'Distinguished Educators': Western Kentucky University’s College of Education and Behavioral Sciences last week announced its fifth cohort of Distinguished Educator Awards.
  • Aviation Heritage Park to display space shuttle scale model: The Bowling Green Aviation Heritage Park will launch an out of this world exhibit this Memorial Day, as a 1:15 scale model of the Space Shuttle Atlantis is set to be introduced. The eight and a half foot replica, “will be displayed as a tribute to all of those who served on the space shuttle” and tell the story of WKU graduate and Russellville native Terry Wilcutt, according to the parks website.
  • Inaugural 'Hackathon' invites techies for development marathon: Despite its name, last weekend's "Hackathon" contestants weren't finding ways to break into your email. The inaugural event from Imagine_BGKY at Western Kentucky University's Innovation Campus invited tech wizzes from across the region for an all-day marathon of development aimed at harnessing Bowling Green's full potential.
  • Slocum to compete in Miss Kentucky competition: Hallie Karson Slocum of Bowling Green will compete in the 2024 Miss Kentucky Competition June 12-15 at SKyPAC. She is a senior at Western Kentucky University studying corporate and organizational communications and musical theatre.
  • Bailey to compete in Miss Kentucky competition: Bowling Green local Amanda Kate Bailey (née Harder) will compete in the 2024 Miss Kentucky Competition as the local titleholder Miss White Oak Waters June 12-15 at SKyPAC. Bailey is the 24-year-old daughter of Bob and Tracy Harder. She attended Western Kentucky University’s Mahurin Honors College where she majored in biochemistry with minors in neuroscience and business administration.
  • Warren Central announces new principal: Warren Central High School Assistant Principal Colton Isaacs did not get much sleep Thursday night. He knew that come Friday afternoon, the school would announce he would soon take over as principal. Isaacs graduated from Western Kentucky University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and a minor in Biology. He completed the Principal Certification Program in 2021 at WKU.

WKU Public Radio

WBKO-TV

  • U.S. Navy conducts executive outreach visit: Members of the United States Navy paid a visit to Bowling Green on an executive outreach visit. Adm. Mattingly also spoke with the Mayor of Bowling Green, Todd Alcott, engineering leaders from Western Kentucky University, and leaders at the General Motors Plant to learn more about the city and further promote partnership between the Navy and Bowling Green.
  • Aviation Heritage Park unveils new space shuttle: There was barely any standing room left at the Aviation Heritage Park on Memorial Day, as locals gathered to celebrate the opening of the Space Shuttle Atlantis Exhibit. Russellville native and WKU graduate Col. Terry Wilcutt helped present the shuttle. He served as Commander on the STS-106 Atlantis and STS-89 Endeavor. He was also a pilot on the STS-68 Endeavour and STS-79 Atlantis.

WNKY-TV

Lane Report

  • Kentucky teacher one of only 9 selected for National STEM Scholar Program: Kourtney Taylor, a teacher at Lincoln County Middle School, is one of nine middle school teachers from eight states selected to participate in the prestigious National STEM Scholar Program, a unique professional development program providing advanced STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) training, national network building and project support for middle school science teachers nationwide.

Owensboro Times

City Beat, Cincinnati, OH

  • Cincinnati Observatory Names Dr. Wes Ryle as New Head Astronomer: The Cincinnati Observatory has a new head astronomer on staff. Dr. Wes Ryle, a veteran astronomer with 16 years of public outreach and education experience, comes to the observatory from Thomas More University, where he served as director of the university’s observatory and as a professor of physics. Dr. Ryle is a Northern Kentucky native, having graduated from Conner High School in Hebron. He went on to study physics and mathematics at Western Kentucky University.

WalletHub

  • Best Business Credit Cards for Bad Credit: What funding options besides a credit card are available to small business owners who have bad credit? Small businesses have two general financing options: equity and/or debt. Equity financing occurs when the business owner receives money from an investor and, in return, the investor is given partial ownership of the business. Angel investors can be an example of equity financing. Debt financing is different as the business owner borrows the money they need from a lender and must repay the initial sum plus interest at the end of the agreed period. The benefit of debt financing is that the business owner does not have to offer the lender partial ownership of their business. -- Golnaz Motie, Assistant Professor of Economics, WKU’s Gordon Ford College of Business
  • 2024 WalletHub Economic Index: With the ongoing uncertainties in this economy, what steps can individuals take to protect their personal finances? Two of the most important things individuals and families can do to protect themselves financially are to focus on building an emergency fund and establishing a realistic, goal-based spending plan. – Zachary Jones, WKU Center for Financial Success

MoneyGeek

  • Expert Advice on Tax Deductions: How often should you review your life insurance coverage to determine if changes may need to be made due to changing financial circumstances that could impact its status as a deductible? One important thing to remember is that the IRS considers life insurance a personal expense, similar to other expenses. Therefore, life insurance premiums are not tax-deductible. However, the IRS does not include life insurance payments in gross income, so any proceeds received from life insurance are generally not taxable. – Dr. Sebastian Leguizamon, WKU Center for Applied Economics

April 18-May 7, 2024

Daily News

  • WKU approves Plona contract, general counsel raise: It is final — Hank Plona is Western Kentucky University's 17th men's basketball coach. WKU's Board of Regents approved Plona's contract promising a $500,000 salary with performance bonuses during a quarterly meeting on Thursday.
  • WKU celebrates Class of 2024 graduates: Splashes of red and black stretched out over the Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium field as the Class of 2024 gathered for Western Kentucky University’s 195th Commencement.
  • WCPS hosts inaugural young entrepreneur competition: From artificially intelligent chatbots to designer jewelry and make-up to portable car heaters, students came to Western Kentucky University’s Innovation Campus ready to pitch ideas that could very well become reality.
  • LifeWorks accepts $4.4 million state investment for autism support: LifeWorks at WKU accepted Tuesday a $4.4 million transfusion of state funds to expand services offered to young adults with autism.
  • Community Foundation awards over $223K in grants: Over $223,000 in grants were awarded to area nonprofits on Tuesday during a ceremony held by the Community Foundation of Southcentral Kentucky at the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce. The top recipient at the ceremony was LifeWorks at Western Kentucky University, which was awarded $35,632.
  • WKU 'tops off' new business college with final steel beam: A big red beam covered with names will forever sit tucked away in the skeleton of Western Kentucky University’s new Gordon Ford College of Business building. The campus community came together Thursday for a “topping-off ceremony” to celebrate the installment of the final steel beam of the work-in-progress structure. Attendees were invited to sign their names before the beam was hoisted high and bolted in place.

WKU Public Radio

WNKY-TV

WBKO-TV

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer

  • The next great adventure: WKU-O graduates 70: The Donald J. Blandford Lecture Hall inside the Humanities Building on Owensboro Community & Technical College’s main campus was decorated with black, red and white Tuesday evening in honor of celebrating Western Kentucky University-Owensboro’s 70-person graduating class.

WNIN-FM, Evansville, IN

Lane Report

  • LifeWorks at WKU receives funding to enhance, expand services: LifeWorks at WKU announced it has received $4.4 million in funding from the Kentucky General Assembly to support its two-year living-and-learning Transition Academy and to expand services by establishing the Bridge Program for autistic young adults.

Spectrum News 1

Kentucky Life, KET

  • The Bell Observatory, CMH23 Radio, Hopewell Museum, Butchertown: The Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University inspires future astronomers; a partnership between Prestonsburg's Mountain Arts Center and online radio station, CMH23 Radio, aims to support the next generation of country music legends; Chip visits the Hopewell Museum in Paris, Ky.; the history of Butchertown, one of Louisville's oldest neighborhoods.

KET Kentucky Edition

American Meteorological Society

  • SunSketcher (Part 2): Ordinary People Become Solar Eclipse Scientists for a Day: During the 2024 North American solar eclipse, a pioneering project aimed to use citizen-science smartphone data to help determine the true shape and size of the sun. How did it turn out? This is part two of a two-part guest post by Gordon Emslie (Western Kentucky University) and Hugh Hudson (University of Glasgow).
  • SunSketcher (Part 1): Using Smartphones to Reveal the Shape of the Sun: During the 2024 North American solar eclipse, a pioneering project aimed to use citizen-science smartphone data to help more accurately determine the shape of the sun. How did it turn out? This is part one of a two-part guest post by Gordon Emslie (Western Kentucky University) and Hugh Hudson (University of Glasgow)

Environmental Monitor

  • Applied Research and Innovative Solutions: Creating CHNGES at Western Kentucky University: Long-standing environmental monitoring programs have the power to support a large number of research initiatives and policy changes—however, actually starting these networks can prove challenging. Not only is starting the program difficult, but keeping things operational for decades to come has also been challenging for environmental professionals hoping to make an impact with applied research. Jason Polk, Professor of Environmental Geoscience and Director of the Center for Human GeoEnvironmental Studies (CHNGES) at Western Kentucky University, is all too familiar with this process.

NIRSA

  • Steve Rey is the 2024 Sarah Fain Distinguished Service Award recipient: Steve Rey has been announced as the recipient of the prestigious 2024 Sarah Fain Distinguished Service Award, a recognition bestowed upon individuals who have demonstrated exceptional dedication and commitment to the NIRSA Championship Series. A graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi, Steve’s illustrious career in recreational sports administration spans multiple institutions—including Western Kentucky University, from which he retired.

April 9-17, 2024

NASA Science

  • More Than 36,000 Volunteers Helped Do NASA Eclipse Science: Thank you for helping us out! Over 36,000 people helped do NASA Science during Monday’s total solar eclipse. Together, these volunteers submitted more than 60,000 vital pieces of eclipse data to NASA science projects. More than 30,000 volunteers with the SunSketcher project pointed their smartphones toward the Sun and recorded pictures of Bailey’s beads, flashes of Sunlight coming through valleys on the moon. These pictures will reveal the size and shape of the Sun to high precision.

Daily News

  • Peruvian journalist to receive international reporting award at WKU: Journalist Manuel Calloquispe’s work in his hometown of Puerto Maldonado, Peru, has made him the target of angry gold miners and profiteers of the Amazonian rainforest’s destruction. His risky reporting earned him the seventh Fleischaker/Greene Award for Courageous International Reporting this year.

WBKO-TV

WNKY-TV

  • Sunrise Spotlight – WKU’s Day of Giving: For today’s edition of Sunrise Spotlight Ashlee Wilson is joined in-studio by Margaret Glaser to talk more about WKU’s Day of Giving. WKU’s Day of Giving takes place on Tuesday, April 23rd.
  • Sunrise Spotlight: WKU Evening of Dance: For today’s Sunrise Spotlight, we got to learn all about WKU’s Evening of Dance with Olivia Frayder and Grace Becker.
  • Western Kentucky University SunSketcher App collects eclipse data: Western Kentucky University students and volunteers went all over from Texas to Indiana to collect data from the solar eclipse. They used the SunSketcher app that will measure the size of the sun.
  • After The Initiation into a Sorority, Fraternity, or secret society in Kentucky and Beyond: A new exhibit is open at Western Kentucky University, it includes professors and students collaborating to spread knowledge. “After the Initiation: Secret Societies, Fraternities and Sororities in Kentucky and Beyond” sheds light on some information that isn’t normally shared when it comes to organizations. This exhibit gives insight into the rituals and gives students who may not understand how these organizations function a new perspective.

Lane Report

March 26-April 8, 2024

Daily News

  • 'New normal:" increased tornado activity seen regionally: A new study indicates Bowling Green has seen an increase in high-intensity tornadoes in the last 20 years, numbers that are part of a regional trend. Jerald Brotzge is a professor of meteorology at Western Kentucky University, director of the Kentucky Mesonet and the Kentucky State Climatologist. He said improvements in technology and population growth have allowed for more tornadoes to be reported.
  • WKU exhibit highlights survivors of sexual assault: A bathing suit, a hoodie and sweatpants, basketball shorts and a T-shirt – it does not matter what a victim is wearing when they are sexually assaulted. Those outfits and more now hang in Western Kentucky University’s Downing Student Union for the “What Were You Wearing?” installation that opened Wednesday.
  • Kentucky Science Center eyeing expansion into Warren County: Mike Norman, CEO of the Kentucky Science Center in Louisville, said when it comes to expanding the museum into Bowling Green, “it’s no longer if we’re going to do it, it’s when are we going to do it.” To gauge community support, a group of Western Kentucky University students with the Hilltopper Consulting Group have created a public survey to learn where a suitable location would be for the facility.
  • Upcoming events celebrate Autism Acceptance Month: April is Autism Acceptance Month, highlighting both the challenges and triumphs of those across the spectrum and the people who support them. The 17th annual LifeSkills Run/Walk for Autism is April 13 at Bowling Green Ballpark. Laura Reynolds, an administrator for Western Kentucky University’s Clinical Education Complex, said this will be her 10th year being involved and “it gets bigger and better and more fun every year.”
  • WKU student selected for prestigious foreign affairs fellowship: Over 250 nominees from 147 universities nationwide applied to the Gaither Junior Fellowship with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, an international affairs think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. Only 16 nominees were selected – including Tani Washington, a history and international affairs student at Western Kentucky University.
  • Millions for Southcentral Kentucky in state budget: Hours before they went home for a 10-day break, Kentucky lawmakers on Thursday passed the biennial budget. Western Kentucky University earned funding for several projects.
  • 'Hackathon' seeks young creators for tech competition: Ladies and gentlemen, start your computers – Bowling Green’s “Hackathon” is about to begin. Programmers, designers, innovators and everyone in between are invited to the first Imagine_BGKY Hackathon, where teams of creators will compete in a tech development race to make Bowling Green better. The first Hackathon, to be held May 11 at Western Kentucky University’s Innovation Campus, challenges participants to harness Bowling Green’s growing economic and cultural potential through technological solutions.

WBKO-TV

WNKY-TV

  • Celebrating Autism Awareness Month: Around the world, April is known as Autism Awareness Month where we celebrate differences and recognize individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. At the Suzanne Vitale Clinical Education Complex at WKU, the Kelly Autism Program offers the community and college students support if needed with a variety of things related to Autism. News 40 spoke to the director of the program and a student about Autism Awareness Month and the implications of the coming days.
  • WKU student selected as university’s first Gaither Junior Fellow: Tani Washington, a 2024 Western Kentucky University graduate in history and international affairs, has been awarded a Gaither Junior Fellowship at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • The Kentucky Museum is installing a multi-media exhibit of south-central Kentucky’s musical heritage: A new exhibit at the Kentucky Museum is expected to be done in about a year, and the museum is asking for community support in their campaign. This exhibit, “Sonic Landscape,” has been a work in progress for the last five years, in hopes of showcasing the musical heritage in our region.
  • WKU announces inaugural Innovation Campus Scholar: On Friday, March 29, Western Kentucky University announced that Jana Michalik, a doctoral candidate at the University of Kentucky, has been named as the inaugural WKU Innovation Campus Scholar.
  • Historic Shake Rag items donated to WKU Special Collections Library: The City of Bowling Green has recently turned over around 800 items to Western Kentucky University’s Special Collections Library to preserve the history of the historic Shake Rag district.
  • Kentucky Museum announces crowdfunding campaign for musical heritage exhibit: This is your chance to receive a backstage pass. Wednesday, The Kentucky Museum unveiled plans for a crowdfunding campaign for Sonic Landscape, a multimedia exhibit that showcases the music heritage of the south-central Kentucky region. The project will cover the 1900s to present day.
  • Netflix show created by WKU graduate tops the rankings: What started off as just a research project for a journalism class, would eventually turn into a six year journey for the truth. Western Kentucky University graduate Christian Hansen started researching coincidentally the same suspicious activity that was being looked into by late reporter Danny Casolaro who died mysteriously back in 1991.

MSNBC

  • You always wanted to be a scientist. The eclipse is your chance.: Despite our sun’s constant presence, remarkably, its precise shape is not known. A free phone app called SunSketcher will let volunteer observers along the eclipse’s path of totality — the thin region where the sun is completely blocked out — capture their views of the rare astronomical event. Researchers hope studying the images taken with these ubiquitous devices will reveal the last drops of sunlight, also known as Baily’s beads, that pass through the valleys on the moon’s surface just before and after totality. “You only need one piece of equipment, and that’s your phone,”  Gordon Emslie, a professor of physics and astronomy at Western Kentucky University and leader of the SunSketcher project, told me.

NASA Science

  • April’s Night Sky Notes: Participate in Eclipse Science: SunSketcher: If you’re traveling to totality, help the SunSketcher team measure the oblateness, or shape, of the Sun during the eclipse by timing the flashes of Baily’s Beads. You will need a smartphone with a working camera for this, along with something to hold the phone in place - don’t forget a spare battery!

WHAS-TV, Louisville

  • Louisville student selected to participate in MIT's prestigious summer program: One talented Louisville student was just chosen to participate in MIT's prestigious, intensive STEM summer program this year. Emma Hyman, a junior at duPont Manual High School and The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, was selected out of 2,500 applicants to be one of the 100 students who will gather at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) this summer for the Research Science Institute (RSI).

Lane Report

  • After productive ’23, Ky farmers hope for the same in ’24: Being at the mercy of Mother Nature is a challenge all farmers face each year and 2024 may turn out to be no different. Jerry Brotzge, Kentucky State Climatologist and Director of the Kentucky Climate Center and Kentucky Mesonet, said our weather pattern is shifting.
  • Ky colleges show 4.4% enrollment growth; degrees, credentials up: The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) heard promising news about enrollment and credential production during its business meeting on March 28 in Frankfort. Enrollment, at all levels and sectors, grew from fall 2022 to fall 2023. Among action items, the Council approved new academic programs at the University of Louisville (UofL) and Western Kentucky University (WKU) that reflect growing workforce needs. WKU added baccalaureate programs in data science and neuroscience.
  • WKU creates innovation campus scholar role: Western Kentucky University announced that Jana Michalik, a doctoral candidate at the University of Kentucky, has been named as the inaugural WKU Innovation Campus Scholar.

AgWired

  • Agri-Pulse Welcomes Rebekah Alvey: Agri-Pulse is pleased to welcome Rebekah Alvey as an associate editor. Alvey, who has experience covering energy and environment issues and Capitol Hill, comes to Agri-Pulse from Politico’s E&E News, where she reported on a broad swath of issues including electric vehicles and endangered species regulation, and she helped cover the House speaker race in October 2023. Alvey earned degrees in journalism and Arabic from Western Kentucky University.

WalletHub

  • Best States to Work from Home: What is the work-from-home outlook for 2024 and beyond? Work-from-home will only continue to increase in 2024 and beyond. This is because organizations that allow remote work options will increase the available talent pool for positions and perhaps have a better capacity to attract top talent. – Dr. Katrina Burch, Associate Professor, WKU Department of Psychological Sciences; Director, Industrial-Organizational Psychology Graduate Program

March 12-25, 2024

WBKO-TV

  • WKU alumnus reflects on the creation of his hit Netflix docuseries ‘The Octopus Murders’: Western Kentucky University’s very own alumnus, Christian Hansen, has taken on the mystery of the Octopus Murders, a conspiracy involving the death of a journalist and all the politics and secrets that came with it. After 10 years of fascination, research and investigative journalism, Hansen and his friend Zachary Treitz were able to release their findings in their Netflix docuseries, “American Conspiracy: The Octopus Murders.”
  • WKU alumna helps create sharp looking gardens at ‘Pop-Up Succulent Bar’: Before the pandemic hit, Western Kentucky University alumna Jill Thornell was an HR Manager, but knew she wanted something more. Though it was only when she needed to find a COVID-friendly alternative to a lemonade stand for her son, that she found her spark.

Spectrum News 1

  • Western Kentucky University creates an eclipse-catching app: Dr. Gordon Emslie loves astrophysics. So much so that he and a group of Western Kentucky University students are working on an app to capture the eclipse. The app is called SunSketcher and it will take 101 photos of the sun during the eclipse automatically. Using the app will be as simple as propping up a phone.

Daily News

  • 'Civic Imagination' incubator returns with six new storytellers: From tales of Appalachian life to tabletop games to blues music compendiums, the Accelerate KY “Civic Imagination Team” incubator is pioneering new ways of storytelling. Sam Ford, executive director of Accelerate KY and co-creator of the incubator, said the incubator connects participants to professionals across the region to make their projects a reality.

WKU Public Radio

Lane Report

  • 82 high school sophomores admitted to Early College at WKU in Glasgow: Eighty-two local high school sophomores have been selected for the next Early College at WKU in Glasgow class.
  • Education: The Numbers Tell a Story: Recently released data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) indicate Kentucky had the highest fall-to-fall total enrollment gains in the nation this past school year. Like many other Kentucky colleges, the Gordon Ford College of Business at Western Kentucky University is adapting to change and promoting the commonwealth as a top-drawer higher education choice.

NASA

  • Sketch the Shape of the Sun for Science During the Solar Eclipse: Calling all eclipse admirers! The SunSketcher team is looking for one million volunteers to capture photos on their cell phones during the April 8 total solar eclipse. These images will help scientists learn about the size, shape, and inner structure of the Sun.

Popular Science

  • NASA needs your smartphone during April’s solar eclipse: Listening for crickets isn’t the only way you can help NASA conduct research during the total solar eclipse passing across much of North America on April 8—you can also lend your smartphone camera to the cause. The agency is calling on anyone within the upcoming eclipse’s path to totality to participate in its SunSketcher program. The program will amass volunteer researcher data to better understand the star’s shape. To participate, all you need is NASA’s free app, which uses a smartphone’s camera coupled with its GPS coordinates to record the eclipse. But why?

Wallet Hub

  • Balance Transfer Credit Cards for Bad Credit: I would look for cards offering a very low or 0% introductory annual percentage rate (APR) on balance transfers, allowing you to pay down the balance without accruing additional interest charges. Additionally, it is crucial to ensure that the credit card issuer you select reports to all three major credit bureaus. Reporting to these bureaus is important for helping you rebuild your credit. – Jonathan Pliszka, Visiting Assistant Professor, WKU Department of Finance

March 2-11, 2024

WKU Public Radio

Daily News

  • Upcoming lecture features WashPo photographers from WKU: Jabin Botsford and Demetrius Freeman became friends at Western Kentucky University a decade ago. Now, they see history unfold first-hand as photographers for The Washington Post. Botsford and Freeman will return to WKU on Wednesday for a gallery showcasing the top shots of their careers and a lecture on their experiences in the field, titled “Roommates: From Western to The White House.”
  • WKU students raise nearly $94,000 for Norton Children’s Hospital at 10th annual Dance Big Red: Hundreds of Western Kentucky University students gathered at WKU’s Raymond B. Preston Health & Activities Center on Friday night, March 8, 2024, for the 10th annual Dance Big Red marathon to benefit Norton Children’s Hospital. The students raised $93,851.99 at the six-hour dance fundraiser for pediatric cardiovascular services and adolescent cancer care at Norton Children’s Hospital.
  • Tech-savvy students flock to Robot Royale: Hundreds of local tech-savvy K-12 students flocked to Western Kentucky University for Warren County Public School’s fourth annual Robot Royale event Thursday.
  • April's total eclipse to skip southcentral Kentucky: Nearly seven years after a solar eclipse darted across the United States, another will move across the country on April 8. Gordon Emslie, a professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department at Western Kentucky University, said unlike the total eclipse in 2017 this one will not fully pass over southcentral Kentucky. The only major cities in Kentucky in the eclipse’s path of totality – the strip of land where a total solar eclipse is visible – are Paducah and Henderson.
  • Regents eye state funding hike, new programs: Western Kentucky University’s Board of Regents met for their quarterly meeting on Friday with legislative updates on several state bills.

WBKO-TV

WNKY-TV

WEHT-TV, Evansville, IN

  • WKU students work together for NASA-funded “SunSketcher” project: Ahead of April 8’s eclipse over the tri-state, students at Western Kentucky University are developing the SunSketcher app. These students and a faculty member are asking for the public’s help to be a part of the larger experiment throughout the eclipse path of totality from Texas to Maine.

Paducah Sun

WPSD-TV, Paducah

NASA

  • SunSketcher: Our Sun is not quite a perfect sphere. Knowing our Sun’s true shape would give scientists new clues about its mysterious interior and test theories of gravity. But precisely measuring the shape of this enormous nearly-round object has been challenging - until now. Join the SunSketcher team and help make these measurements during the total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024!

Oak Ridger, Oak Ridge, TN

Lane Report

Kentucky Teacher

  • Record number of students participate in 2024 Educators Rising Kentucky conference: A record number of 771 high school students attended the 2024 Educators Rising Kentucky State Conference, held at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville on March 6. Colin Anderson, a junior at Franklin-Simpson High School (Simpson County) and member of the Western Kentucky University Young Male Leadership Academy, was part of a group that participated in the public service announcement (PSA) competition, where the students devised a PSA to recruit teachers. He said Educators Rising has helped him with his public speaking to pursue his goals after high school.

WalletHub

  • Best Student Checking Accounts: Navigating the transition from high school to college marks a significant milestone in a traditional college student's life, often heralding a period of newfound independence and responsibility. Among the multitude of changes and challenges students can encounter, managing one’s finances emerges as a crucial skill that every student must learn to master. As such, gaining knowledge about checking accounts becomes indispensable. – Dr. Monica Galloway Burke, Professor, WKU Department of Counseling & Student Affairs

February 21-March 1, 2024

Daily News

WNKY-TV

WBKO-TV

WKU Public Radio

  • Second annual concert benefiting Margaret Munday Scholarship returns to WKU: A concert featuring a diverse set of performances is back at Western Kentucky University for a second year. The show raises funds for the Margaret Munday Scholarship overseen by the Mu Iota Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota (SAI). In addition to helping music students from diverse communities pursue their dreams, the scholarship also honors the legacy of Margaret Munday.

Lane Report

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer

Louisville Courier Journal

February 8-20, 2024

WNKY-TV

  • Sunrise Spotlight: SCATS and VAMPY at WKU: For today’s Sunrise Spotlight, we met with Dr. Julia Roberts who told us all about how you can get your high schooler involved in academically driven programs at Western Kentucky University.
  • Expert shares view regarding wrong categorization of state rock and mineral: In 1998, students from Louisville requested that the State Legislature change the designation of coal from the state rock to the state mineral. Later, in 2000, Kentucky Agate, or Chalcedony, was designated as the state rock. Both of these designations are categorically inaccurate – coal, which is organic in nature, cannot be a mineral. Even though it may contain millions of them, it is a rock. Agate is crystalline in nature and contains predominantly one substance, primarily quartz, itself being a mineral, which makes agate a mineral. Geologists like Michael May, a professor of Geology at WKU, have been upset with this decision for decades.
  • The infamous sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum reaches 10-year anniversary: In 2014, a natural disaster in Bowling Green fueled a global conversation about the National Corvette Museum and a little-known fact about our unique landscape in south central Kentucky. James Polk, director of the Center for Geo-environmental Studies at Western Kentucky University, says “We are in a karst area, which means we have lots of caves, lots of sinkholes, lots of underground streams, it’s a very dynamic landscape. So, that means things are constantly happening underground, beneath our feet that you might not see, and that includes the potential development for sinkholes, pretty much anywhere you are in this part of the world and south central Kentucky.”

WBKO-TV

Spectrum News 1

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer

  • Oller named Coming Home King at WKU: Grant Oller’s involvement in numerous organizations at Western Kentucky University helped him be named WKU’s Coming Home King on Thursday during halftime of a men’s basketball game at E.A. Diddle Arena.

Owensboro Times

Lane Report

  • WKU once again celebrates historic fall-to-spring retention successes: In what has become a familiar trend in recent years, Western Kentucky University students again returned to campus for the spring semester at record rates, President Timothy C. Caboni announced on Tuesday, February 13. Among the university’s retention successes, 85.4% of fall undergraduate degree seeking students who were enrolled in the fall returned for the spring semester, the highest percentage since the university began tracking this data in 2010.
  • WKU Gordon Ford online programs recognized: Three programs in Western Kentucky University’s Gordon Ford College of Business (GFCB) are ranked among the 2024 Best Online Programs by U.S. News & World Report.
  • WKU Online recognized among top Online Bachelor’s Programs in state, nation: U.S. News & World Report has ranked Western Kentucky University among the top 100 Best Online Bachelor’s Programs in the nation – and No. 2 in Kentucky.

WSON-AM, Henderson

  • City of Henderson names new assistant city manager: Dylan Ward has been named the city of Henderson’s new assistant city manager. A graduate of Western Kentucky University, Ward obtained a B.S. in Civil Engineering and a Masters in Public Administration. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer in the State of Kentucky.

Georgetown News-Graphic

  • New City Attorney works for community: Georgetown’s new city attorney is a Kentucky native, who has worked for both the Covington and Lexington governments. Emilee Buttrum’s focus in her new role has been continuous improvement.  Buttrum’s first job after graduating from Western Kentucky University was in economic development with the Chamber of Commerce in her hometown, Bowling Green.

Online Ed.D. Programs

  • Interview with Dr. Kimberlee Everson:  In addition to her research and teaching roles at WKU, Dr. Everson serves as Chair of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate’s (CPED) Dissertation in Practice Award Committee.

January 27-February 7, 2024

Daily News

  • Hannah appointed new director of UT Press: Katie Hannah has been appointed as director of the University of Tennessee Press. She received her Master of Arts in English from Western Kentucky University.
  • After 22 years, SOKY Book Fest coming to an end: The Warren County Public Library has announced its decision to end the Southern Kentucky Book Fest, with plans to refocus its efforts on a series of author events throughout the year. Over the past 22 years, the library had partnered with Barnes & Noble and Western Kentucky University to bring the event featuring national and regional authors and related events to Bowling Green. The event has typically drawn thousands each spring.
  • Cybersecurity data analytics vital in higher education: WKU’s Cybersecurity Data Analytics graduate program offers a master’s degree in Cybersecurity Data Analytics, as well as certificates in cybersecurity data analytics and in data analytics. These degrees and certificates are vital as we navigate an era where our personal and professional lives are increasingly connected to the digital realm.
  • Beshear tours WKU Innovation Campus: Gov. Andy Beshear visited Western Kentucky University’s Innovation Campus on Thursday after a stop at Tyson Food’s bacon facility opening earlier that day.

WBKO-TV

  • Remembering WKU’s first African-American faculty members: February is Black History Month. Locally, there are numerous men and women who’ve played a crucial role in the black history in the city. Dr. Mable Anderson, Dr. James Beck, and his wife Jacqueline were the trailblazers who paved the way for African-American Faculty at WKU.
  • WKU conducting a survey on driving the roundabout: If you’ve ever had an opinion about the roundabouts in Bowling Green, now could be your chance to speak your mind and be heard. Western Kentucky University is currently conducting a survey for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to hear the public’s opinions about roundabouts and any issues Kentuckians have faced when coming across one while driving.
  • Once in a lifetime cicada double brood emergence to occur this year: Cicadas are the annual sound of the summer, but this year the volume could be dialed up to 11. For the first time since 1803, the United States will see a double brood event where the 13-year and 17-year “periodical” cicadas will emerge from the ground during the same year. Western Kentucky University Distinguished Professor Dr. Keith Philips says it is a spectacular biological phenomenon in the country.

WNKY-TV

  • House Bill 10 filed in Kentucky to address maternal mortality rate: A bill relating to maternal health in Kentucky is currently awaiting to hit the House floor. Rep. Kim Moser, along with colleagues, has worked on a bill to help address Kentucky’s maternal mortality rate. News 40 spoke to Rachel Tinius, an associate professor of exercise science at Western Kentucky University and CEO of “Bumpt Up”, an app that helps to keep women physically active and in better health during their pregnancy and offers health information.

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise

Yahoo News

  • Yes, there are more potholes on Kentucky roads after winter. A scientist explains why: Come springtime, you’ll likely see more crews out patching potholes or notice bigger cracks along Kentucky’s roadways. To understand why this is and the role water plays in the process, we spoke with Chris Groves, Ph.D., the director of the Crawford Hydrology Laboratory at Western Kentucky University and a university distinguished professor.

America’s Best Racing

  • John Asher: Dedicated Kentucky Derby Ambassador and Friend to All: More than five years after his sudden passing, John Asher lives on in the sport he cherished, his love of family, friends, and the Kentucky Derby and its home his lasting legacy. After graduating with a journalism degree from Western Kentucky University, he went to work for radio stations in Bowling Green and then Louisville, his knowledge of the Derby making him a natural fit for covering the race each year.

Credit Donkey

January 18-26, 2024

Daily News

  • Chamber announces tech council at 89th annual celebration: The Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce announced the creation of a new regional technology council at its 89th annual celebration on Tuesday. CEO Ron Bunch said the project will be a partnership with Western Kentucky University’s Innovation Campus to better connect and attract emerging technology companies in the area.
  • WKU, other universities join to support kids: Western Kentucky University’s student-led charity event Dance Big Red has joined with DanceBlue at the University of Kentucky and RaiseRED at the University of Louisville for the fourth annual Commonwealth Cup, a statewide fundraiser that supports pediatric cancer and heart care.
  • 'Topper Social' bar set to open in February: Jordan Greene originally wanted an office job. Now he is the owner of two bars in downtown Bowling Green, with a third coming in late February. Greene, a 2018 graduate of Western Kentucky University and the current owner of both Dublin's Irish Pub and The Copper Bar, is planning to open Topper Social in the building once occupied by Hideout on Center Street close to campus.
  • WKU to close Hilltopper Hall after building 'shifted': Students at Western Kentucky University who live in Hilltopper Hall have until Feb. 4 to move out of the dorm after personnel with WKU Facilities Management found some exterior masonry had “shifted out of place” earlier in the academic year.

WKU Public Radio

WNKY-TV

WBKO-TV

  • Governor Andy Beshear tours WKU’s Innovation Campus: Today, Governor Andy Beshear visited the WKU Innovation Campus in Bowling Green. Representatives from the university gave Beshear a tour of the 280,000-square-foot facility that acts as a hub for innovation, collaboration, and investment in the community.
  • Hilltopper Hall residents and parents react to relocation: On Jan. 18 Western Kentucky University sent an email out to Hilltopper Hall residents and parents, explaining that some “exterior masonry work” had shifted out of position and residents would have to relocate from the hall. Hilltopper Hall resident Jazmine Fletcher described the air in the hall as devastating following the news.

Spectrum News 1

Foreign Policy

  • What Is Taiwan’s New President Going to Do About China?: On Jan. 13, Taiwan hosted the first of many critical elections in 2024—elections that may reshape the global political order. In the first close three-candidate race since 2000, current Vice President Lai Ching-te of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) defeated Hou Yu-ih of the Kuomintang (KMT) and Taiwan People’s Party (TPP) candidate Ko Wen-je. (By Timothy S. Rich, a professor of political science and the director of the International Public Opinion Lab at Western Kentucky University.)

Taipei Times

  • US, China views key for Lai: expert: Achieving a consensus on how Taiwanese view the China threat and US security commitments to Taiwan would be challenging for president-elect William Lai, a US academic said in an article published on Wednesday. In an article in Foreign Policy, Timothy Rich, a professor of political science and director of the International Public Opinion Lab at Western Kentucky University, analyzed how Taiwanese public opinion would affect the incoming administration.

Yahoo Finance

  • OneAmerica® Appoints New Board Member George Nichols: George Nichols III, CAP®, president and CEO of The American College of Financial Services, has been appointed to the OneAmerica® Board of Directors. The OneAmerica Board of Directors has oversight to the long-term direction of the financial services organization. Nichols received his associate's degree from Alice Lloyd College, a faith-based liberal arts school in eastern Kentucky, before earning his bachelor's degree from Western Kentucky University.

MoneyGeek

  • Expert Insights on Federal Funds Rate: Is it important for the average consumer to understand how the federal funds rate works? Why or Why not? From the economist's point of view, it is always important that people understand concepts like the Federal Funds Rates. These "target" rates are the rates banks use to lend and borrow from each other to meet the daily reserve requirements. -- Dr. Sebastian Leguizamon, Director, Center for Applied Economics, and Associate Professor of Economics, WKU

January 9-17, 2024

Daily News

WNKY-TV

  • WKU police participate in active shooter training: The Western Kentucky University Police Department took part in a two-day active shooter training scenario in order for the members of the department to be able to better respond to a chaotic event.
  • Combat your holiday debt with a spending plan: The holidays can be mentally and financially draining and may leave you needing a plan to pay off holiday debt. Director of the Center for Financial Success at Western Kentucky University, Andrew Head, says “Staying out of debt requires staying on top of the expenses that you have and making sure that you’ve got a plan for them.”
  • New storytelling consultancy announces headquarters in Bowling Green: A new storytelling consultancy announced Monday its founding and establishment of its headquarters in Bowling Green. The company, Suspenders of Disbelief, will be housed in the Collaborative SmartSpace of the Western Kentucky University Innovation Campus HQ, according to the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce.

CNBC

  • U.S. and China keep a close watch as Taiwan heads to the polls: “Regarding relations with China or the US, my concern would be that it provides an opportunity for mixed messages from Taiwan, one that China may try to exploit,” said Timothy S. Rich, a professor in political science at Western Kentucky University.

WTVF-TV, Nashville, TN

  • Highlights from Tuwanda Coleman's career at NewsChannel 5: Our very own Tuwanda Coleman announced last week that after 41 years, she will be retiring from NewsChannel 5 and Talk of the Town. She joined the NC5 family in 1981. Tuwanda grew up in Cadiz, Kentucky, and majored in Broadcasting with an emphasis in news reporting at Western Kentucky.

WalletHub

  • Non-Owner Car Insurance: What kind of drivers should consider Non-Owner Car Insurance? Non-owner car insurance is typically recommended for those who do not own a car but either borrow cars from someone else or rent cars often. -- J. Sebastian Leguizamon, Associate Professor of Economics, Gordon Ford College of Business, WKU

January 1-8, 2024

Daily News 

WNKY-TV 

  • Locally created app for pregnant, postpartum women has launched: A new app to change health outcomes for mothers and newborns has just launched. BumptUp Labs is a new app that helps pregnant and postpartum women become and stay active with tailored workouts, social support, and yoga classes, as well as weight, calorie and symptom tracking. Western Kentucky University associate professor of exercise science, mom of four, and BumptUp CEO, Rachel Tinius, says “I’ve been doing research with exercise during pregnancy through all four of my pregnancies, the app was in the works over the past two. And I’ve definitely utilized my own personal experiences to help form a lot of features of the app.” 

Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 

  • Local artist creates extraordinary from the ordinary: Countless children and teenagers in our community have been inspired by the artistry of one woman, Regina Williams. Hosting art classes in her quaint cottage studio in Glendale for the past 20 years, Williams seems to possess an endless supply of ideas and creativity. “I went to Western (Kentucky University) in 1971 and majored in art education to teach,” she said. “I graduated in May of 1975 and got a call from a good friend who was an artist at Fort Knox.” 

Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 

  • Bare Linens online only — for now: Lindsey Ioia picked up her bachelor’s degree in business administration and management from Western Kentucky University this summer and launched her own business — Bare Linens — on Oct. 1. 

City-County Observer, Evansville, IN 

December 13-31, 2023

Daily News

  • Renowned local author, folklorist Lynwood Montell dies at 92: Local award-winning author and folklorist William Lynwood Montell died last week, leaving behind a wife, two children, five grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and a long list of books penned over his 92-year life. Montell was renowned for documenting life across Kentucky. He played a crucial role in forming Western Kentucky University’s folk studies masters program, where he taught for over 30 years, and dedicated much of his time to studying the Upper Cumberland region. 
  • Experts discuss December tornado trend: Climatologists and meteorologists across the region are trying to make sense of an increase in December tornadoes across southcentral Kentucky in recent years. 
  • Still hilltoppin': WKU grads complete hiking 'triple crown': Those Western Kentucky University students who complain about having to hike uphill to get to class could get a dose of humility from a pair of WKU graduates: Garrett and Savannah Anderson. 
  • WKU senior recognized for non-profit e-learning company: Nessa Unseld, a 20-year-old Western Kentucky University senior, may be the youngest CEO at WKU’s Innovation Campus. 
  • WKU holds signing day for WCPS teachers seeking certification: Athletes aren’t the only students at Western Kentucky University to get a signing day. Educators from across the county joined WKU leaders Tuesday for a signing event celebrating the first cohort of Warren County Public School teachers seeking certification through the university’s Grow Your Own program.

WNKY-TV

WBKO-TV

  • WCPS and WKU hold joint signing for Grow Your Own program: With Kentucky facing a massive teacher shortage, Warren County Public Schools and Western Kentucky University team up to help out by holding a joint signing for Grow Your Own scholarships.
  • WKU student creates adult-readiness website for soon to graduate students: College students looking for resources on the adjustment to life after school will now have an answer. Janessa Unseld is a student at Western Kentucky University that found a lack of career readiness resources she thought were much needed for soon to graduate students. Like any college student, she began coding, two years ago. She recently published the soft launch of her new website, Coleus Academy. 

Spectrum News 1 

  • Hardin County School District combats teacher shortage, helps staff reach its goals: School districts across the Commonwealth are getting creative when it comes to dealing with teacher shortages. Several districts are using "grow your own" programs to fill vacancies at a fraction of the cost. In Hardin County, the school district is partnering with Western Kentucky University (WKU) to help its staff get teaching certified, or get their master’s degree. 

WFIE-TV, Evansville, IN

  • Ohio Co. schools host first choir concert in nearly a decade: Ohio County schools hosted their first choir concert since resurrecting their choir and drama departments on Thursday. Director Ryan Himes explained that finally being offered the job to bring choir and drama back was a dream come true. “The whole reason I went to WKU to be a music teacher was to be a choir director at Ohio County,” he said.

November 29-December 12, 2023

Daily News

  • WKU to seek additional state funding due to inflationary pressure: Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni said the university’s top legislative priority going into January will be seeking additional base and performance funding from the state.
  • Teacher Hall of Fame celebrates four local inductees: Educators from across the region converged on Western Kentucky University’s campus to celebrate the induction of four local teachers to the Governor Louie B. Nunn Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame.
  • Drakes Creek names new principal: Drakes Creek Middle School students and staff welcomed their new principal to the school on Wednesday with cupcakes and a resounding “Go Gators!” Bonnie Spears, who currently serves as principal of Chandler’s School in Logan County, will begin the formal transition to Drakes Creek in January. Spears graduated from Western Kentucky University in 2003 with a Bachelor of Science in Middle Grades Education. She received her Master of Arts in Education in 2010 and obtained her Rank 1 in Leadership and Administration in 2018 from WKU as well.
  • WKU Greek Orgs wrap gifts for 34 Parker-Bennett-Curry students: The sounds of Bing Crosby lilted across Downing Student Union as dozens of Western Kentucky University students busily wrapped footballs, plushies, sweaters and coloring books. WKU’s Greek Organizations, around 30 in total, came together Tuesday for the culmination of the Christmas Angel program — preparing gifts for 34 Parker-Bennett-Curry Elementary students.

WBKO-TV

WNKY-TV

  • New superintendent named for Logan County Schools: Dr. Dan Costellow, Ed. D. has been named the new superintendent of Logan County Schools. He obtained his superintendent certification and doctor of educational leadership from Western Kentucky University. He also obtained his master of arts in secondary education and a bachelor of science in agricultural education from WKU.
  • Meet Hunter Lee, future meteorologist and viral TikTok star: There’s a local talent in town spreading weather knowledge. A WKU student is taking his love for weather and sports to a whole new level across the United States and going viral for posting his journey on TikTok.
  • The Book Donation Extravaganza giving students at Parker Bennett Curry reading opportunities: An elementary school in Bowling Green celebrated the joy of reading today by giving those who are less fortunate the opportunity to dive into a book. At Parker Bennett Curry Elementary School thanks to the special book extravaganza. WKU Literacy Ambassadors are providing elementary students with limited access to books the chance to read at home by partnering with the Bowling Green Rotary Club and Half Price Books.
  • The importance of Heimlich maneuver training: From the senate chamber to right here at home, anyone can learn to do the Heimlich maneuver. After Sen. Rand Paul saved a fellow senator’s life in the chamber by using the move, learning how to properly help someone when they are choking can prove to be critical. Gerita Cook, a WKU CPR training coordinator says, “What happens when a person choke, that airway is restricted, so knowing the Heimlich allows that airway to get back open and free so that we can save and maintain that life. Everyone needs to know this, and I take great pride in every person I train here at Western, especially my nursing students, because I know I’m training the next generation of health care professionals to be saving lives.”
  • Annual Teacher Hall of Fame hosted at Western Kentucky University: Teaching is not an easy job by any means, and many students don’t appreciate what teachers do until later on in life. Every year since 2000, Western Kentucky University makes a difference for teachers by honoring educators and inducting them into the Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame.
  • Bonnie Spears named as new principal of Drakes Creek Middle School: The Warren County Public Schools District announced Bonnie Spears Wednesday as the new principal of Drakes Creek Middle School. Spears graduated in 2003 with a bachelor of science in middle grades education. She received her master of arts in education (summa cum laude) in 2010 and obtained her Rank 1 in leadership and administration in 2018 – all from Western Kentucky University.
  • WKU Greek Life gift wrapping event: Fraternities and sororities gathered inside Downing Student Union to wrap presents they bought for students at Parker Bennett Curry Elementary.

Spectrum News 1

WCLU-FM, Glasgow

  • Four inducted into Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame: Four exceptional educators, two of which taught in Glasgow and Barren County Schools, who made an impact in their classrooms and their communities were inducted into the Gov. Louie B. Nunn Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame on Friday, December 1, 2023 in a ceremony at Western Kentucky University.

New York Times

  • Events to Shake, or Gently Rattle, the World in 2024: UNITED STATES, MEXICO AND CANADA, April 8: Don your eclipse glasses and watch the moon and the sun align in a cosmic kiss as the Pacific Ocean, Mexico, part of the United States, Canada and the North Atlantic plunge into daytime darkness. It will be the last solar eclipse in the United States for more than 20 years. Celebrate it at the Total Eclipse of the Heart Festival in Arkansas or the Portal Eclipse Festival in Mexico. Wherever you are, download SunSketcher 2024, an app developed by NASA to allow observers in the path of totality to capture images at varying angles and contribute to NASA’s heliophysics research.

WDKY-TV, Lexington

  • Kentucky couple completes ‘Triple Crown of hiking’: You can’t write the love story of Garrett and Savannah Anderson without including their passion for the outdoors and hiking. “We went to school at Western Kentucky University near Mammoth Cave,” Savannah explained. “So, we did a lot of hiking there and that’s actually where he proposed to me. So, the outdoor kind of scene has always been part of our background.”

More: WKU in the News Archive



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 Last Modified 7/9/24