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    [MemberID] => 5196
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Chris
    [Last_Name] => Antonsen
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    [Email] => chris.antonsen@wku.edu
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    [Title] => Part-time Instructor (web), Folk Studies
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    [Phone] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>FLK 388: Foodways (web)</p>
<p>Past courses:</p>
<p>FLK 280: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (undergrad class)</p>
<p>FLK 371: Urban Folklore (undergrad class)</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>BA Rhetoric, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign</p>
<p>MA Folk Studies, Western Kentucky University</p>
<p>PhD English with a concentration in Folk Studies, Ohio State University</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Dr. Christopher Antonsen began teaching in 1989 as a part-time faculty member at WKU while working on his M.A. in Folk Studies. While he pursued his Ph.D. at Ohio State University, he continued teaching literature and folklore courses. Also while at OSU, he and fellow folklorist Larry Doyle founded the AFS Graduate Student Section.</p>
<p>In 2001, Chris returned to WKU as a full-time professor teaching Cultural Diversity in the U.S., Urban Folklore, Ethnographic Research Methods, Folk Narrative, and Folklore Genres. He was also the founding faculty advisor for the WKU Folklore Club and an active member of the Women's Studies faculty.</p>
<p>Two years later, Chris began teaching web-delivered courses for WKU. He says that he loves teaching online courses, which require much more intensive forms of preparation and "class time" management. His approach to teaching Cultural Diversity "boils down to a specific focus on the nature and mechanics of culture itself. Exploring types of difference, then, functions to reveal and reinforce the fundamental understanding that all people are cultural beings and, as such, interpret the world around them according to the beliefs and priorities of cultures that influence them."</p>
<p>In 2009, Chris left Bowling Green and switched to teaching online classes for the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology part-time. In addition, he now teaches middle school literature and composition full time at Countryside School in Champaign, Illinois, his wife's and his home town. Little did he realize it before taking that job, but he absolutely loves teaching and spending time with learners at that age. As one should be able to expect, though, he slyly (and often not so slyly) works folklore into his middle school literature curriculum. Folklore is, after all, everywhere.</p>
<p>"In my years at WKU, I have enjoyed the terrific help of graduate assistants Scheri Smith, Claire Aubrey, Kevin Murphy, Stuart Burrill, Tim Jorgensen, Butch Ross, Nelda Ault, and Cynthia Cotton (from "Canadia"). I offer my continuing thanks to each of them for the things they've done for me and for their friendship."</p>
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(
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Darlene
    [Last_Name] => Applegate
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    [Email] => darlene.applegate@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor, Anthropology & Department Head
    [Office] => FAC 237
    [Phone] => 270 745-5898
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>ANTH 125: Introduction to Biological Anthropology<br />ANTH 130: Introduction to Archaeology<br />ANTH 300: Forensic Anthropology<br />ANTH 305: Paleoanthropology: Human Origins and Evolution<br />ANTH 335: Old World Prehistory<br />ANTH 336: New World Prehistory<br />ANTH 395: Lab Practicum in Archaeology or Biological Anthropology<br />ANTH 432:432G, Field Course in Archaeology<br />ANTH 434:434G, Graveyard Archaeology<br />ANTH 436: Applied Archaeology<br />ANTH 438: Archaeological Lab Methods<br />ANTH 450:450G, Modern Human Biological Variation<br />ANTH 493: Archaeological Stewardship<br />ANTH 495: Directed Study</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., Anthropology, The Ohio State University<br />M.A., Anthropology, The Ohio State University<br />B.A., Anthropology and Geology, Miami University</p>
<p>I am&nbsp;an archaeologist with a background in biological anthropology and geology. I teach undergraduate courses in archaeology and biological anthropology, several of which have graduate components. My research interests include Eastern Woodlands archaeology, cave and rockshelter archaeology, graveyard / mortuary archaeology, settlement archaeology, site formation processes, lithic analysis, and bioarchaeology. I currently serve as the Anthropology Program Director. I am faculty advisor for the Anthropology Club and the director of the WKU Anthropology Lab. I am an active member of the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists and a member of the Living Archaeology Weekend Steering Committee. I am the Secretary-Treasurer of the Board of Directors of the Kentucky Center for Native American Arts and Culture, Inc. I am principal investigator of several grant-funded projects, including an archaeological site stewardship program at Mammoth Cave National Park and an archaeological survey of the WKU Upper Green River Biological Preserve. I also conduct Section 106 archaeological surveys.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <div>
<p>Bioarchaeological Analysis of Human Skeletal Remains from 15Al329A, a Late Woodland-Mississippi Stonebox Cemetery in Allen County, Kentucky (in press). In Current Archaeological Research in Kentucky Volume 9. Kentucky Heritage Council, Frankfort, 19 pp. Co-author: Dominica DeDominico.</p>
</div>
<p>Woodland Period (2008). In Past Accomplishments and Future Directions: The Kentucky State Archaeology Plan (2nd edition), edited by David Pollack, pp. 341-608. Kentucky Heritage Council, Frankfort.</p>
<p>Archaeological Survey of the Western Kentucky University Upper Green River Biological Preserve, Hart County, Kentucky. Volume I: Literature Review and Phase I Survey (May 2007). Prepared for Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, 496 pp.</p>
<p>Woodland Period Systematics in the Middle Ohio Valley (2005). Co-edited with Robert C. Mainfort, Jr., Arkansas Archaeological Survey. Includes my preface 'The Good Servant and the Bad Master' (pp. xi-xx) and chapter 'Woodland Taxonomy in the Middle Ohio Valley: A Historical Overview' (pp. 1-18). University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa. &nbsp; &nbsp;</p>
<p>Phase I Archaeological Survey for a Proposed Health Care Facility in Bowling Green, Warren County, Kentucky (September 2004). Submitted to Bowling Green-Warren County Primary Care Center, Bowling Green, KY, 67 pp.</p>
<p>Phase I Archaeological Survey for a Proposed Poultry Facility Near Monticello, Wayne County, Kentucky (August 2003). Submitted to Owens Poultry, Monticello, KY, 42 pp.</p>
<p>Evidence of Differential Mortuary Treatment from the Watkins Site (15Lo12), a Woodland-Mississippi Period Burial Mound in South-Central Kentucky (2002). Proceedings of the 21st Mid-South Archaeological Conference: Ethnicity in Archaeology, edited by C. A. Buchner, pp. 33-45. Panamerican Consultants Special Publication No. 2. Panamerican Consultants, Inc., Memphis. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p>Artifact Displacement and Damage Resulting From Human Trampling (2002). Bulletin Voor Archeologische Experimenten en Educatie, pp. 5-8. Leiden, the Netherlands. &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p>Archeological Assessment of the Proposed Parking Lot Drainage Improvement Project Package 187, Mammoth Cave, Kentucky (December 2002). Submitted to Mammoth Cave National Park, Mammoth Cave, KY, 69 pp.</p>
<p>Phase I Archaeological Survey of a Proposed Telecommunication Tower Site Near Drakesboro, Muhlenburg County, Kentucky (October 2001). Submitted to Terracon Consulting, Inc., Louisville, KY, 29 pp.</p>
<p>The Watkins Site (15Lo12) Revisited: Previous Research, New Interpretations, and Recent Artifact Analysis (2000). In Current Archaeological Research in Kentucky Volume 6, edited by D. Pollack and K. J. Gremillion, pp. 121-143. Kentucky Heritage</p>
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    [Added_By] => michael.williams
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    [Edited_By] => donna.schulte
    [Edited_Date] => 2017-07-17 15:33:47
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    [Prefix] => Mr.
    [First_Name] => Brent
    [Last_Name] => Bjorkman
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => brent.bjorkman@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Director, Kentucky Folklife Program; Director, Kentucky Museum
    [Office] => FAC 188
    [Phone] => 270 745-6261
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Graduate Courses:</span></p>
<p>FLK 585: Public Folklore and Practice in Washington, D.C.&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>M.A., Folk Studies, Western Kentucky University<br />Tr&auml;sl&ouml;jd Betyg (Traditional Woodwork Degree),<strong>&nbsp;</strong>V&auml;sterberg Folkh&ouml;gskola, Sweden<br />B.S.,&nbsp; Social Studies/History-Secondary Education,<strong>&nbsp;</strong>Saint Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minnesota&nbsp;</p>
<p>Brent Bj&ouml;rkman is the Director of the Kentucky Museum and the Kentucky Folklife Program.&nbsp;Bj&ouml;rkman&rsquo;s initial connection to the world of folklore came as a student of material culture, ethnology, and traditional wood design at V&auml;sterberg Folk High school near Sandviken, Sweden. Upon returning to the U.S. in 1996 Bj&ouml;rkman followed this practical application of material culture with a MA in Folk Studies from Western Kentucky University. From 1998 through 2004 Bj&ouml;rkman held the position of folklife specialist with the Kentucky Folklife Program. During this time he worked to facilitate much of the KFP&rsquo;s ongoing programming which included fieldwork and documentation projects, a biennial state-wide folklife festival, a folklife project and folk art apprenticeship granting program, and educational outreach programs for teacher&rsquo;s and community scholars. Bj&ouml;rkman has also lent his voice as a public folklorist to many national and state organizations like the National Endowment for the Arts and National Council for the Traditional Arts, Southern Arts Federation, Northwest Folklife, the Maine Arts Commission, West Virginia Folk Art Apprenticeship Program, The Mississippi Arts Commission, the Illinois Arts Council and the Ohio Arts Council.&nbsp;In July of 2005 Bj&ouml;rkman became the first Associate Director of the American Folklore Society based in Columbus, Ohio before taking the position of Executive Director of the Vermont Folklife Center in 2007. He held this position for five years before coming back to Kentucky in July of 2012 to assume the role of Director of the Kentucky Folklife Program. In January of 2015,&nbsp;Bj&ouml;rkman became the Director of the Kentucky Museum leading the mounting of&nbsp;exhibits that integrate local arts and cultures, such as the basket exhibit and the Bosnian exhibit. Recent work has had Bj&ouml;rkman leading a join Kentucky Folklife Program and Kentucky Museum team in the presentation of two defined exhibit research and installation projects based on diverse Kentucky folklore including <em>Standing the Test of Time: Kentucky&rsquo;s White Oak Basket Tradition</em> and <em>A Culture Carried: Bosnians in Bowling Green.</em></p>
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    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2012-09-18 08:35:02
    [Edited_By] => chloe.brown257
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-03-18 18:21:16
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(
    [MemberID] => 1519
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Erika
    [Last_Name] => Brady
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => erika.brady@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Professor, Folk Studies
    [Office] => FAC 268
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Graduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 462: Folklore and Medicine<br />FLK 575: Folk Belief<br />FLK 576: American Traditional Music<br />FLK 578: Folklore Fieldwork</p>
<p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Undergraduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 277: World Music<br />FLK 281: Roots of Southern Culture<br />FLK 375: Supernatural Folklore</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., Folklore, Indiana University<br />M.A., Folklore, UCLA<br />B.A. mcl, Harvard / Radcliffe</p>
<p>I work with Family Practice medical residents at University of Louisville and several other medical schools, familiarizing them with nonconventional health belief systems in their region. And I host "Barren River Breakdown," a weekly radio show on WKYU-FM featuring American roots music.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p><a href="http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/usupress_pubs/64/" target="_blank">2001.&nbsp;<em>Healing Logics: Culture and Medicine in Modern Health Belief Systems</em>. Logan: Utah State University Press.</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/693" target="_blank">1999.&nbsp;<em>A Spiral Way: How the Phonograph Changed Ethnography</em>.&nbsp;Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.</a></p>
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    [Staff_Website] => 
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    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 08:14:14
    [Edited_By] => kate.horigan
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:22:47
    [Show_Images] => 1
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5198
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Camilla
    [Last_Name] => Collins
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => camilla.collins@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Retired faculty, Folk Studies
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Now in the North Carolina mountains, Jane and I are ten minutes away from three places which are very important to us: 1) downtown Asheville with its art galleries and restaurants, 2) the Blue Ridge Parkway and miles of hiking trails, and 3) the NC Center for Creative Retirement which offers its own courses and lectures as well as easy access to events and classes at UNC-Asheville. Family and friends visit often.</p>
<p>Let us know if you're coming our way. My WKU email address is the best way to get in touch with me.</p>
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    [Added_By] => ann.ferrell
    [Added_Date] => 2017-12-04 14:01:44
    [Edited_By] => chloe.brown257
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-02-21 17:25:46
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5199
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Larry
    [Last_Name] => Danielson
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jsebastianb@usa.net
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Retired faculty, Folk Studies
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Happily retired in northeastern Wisconsin, Kerstin and I are enjoying family life- three generations worth with children and grandchildren close by. We welcome visitors whatever the season. (Special awards to those who visit us in February for sturgeon-spearing weekend on frozen Lake Winnebago.)</p>
<p>Three major projects occupy my attention these days: pursuing an undergraduate music history "degree" (mostly as an auditor) at the Lawrence University Conservatory and Academy here in Appleton; family history research which makes use of my folk studies because written personal documents do not exist; and my most recent project, a collection of personal essays tentatively titled "Tradition, Memory, and Nostalgia." The work concerns the meanings of folk traditions important in my life and their contradictory consequences--no footnotes, no bibliography, and self-published so I can have as much control over the book as possible. It is intended mostly for family and friends, though I expect it could be used as primary source material by folklorists, the kind of document that a hundred years distant would delight a researcher. Think of the extended illustrations of folk tradition from my personal life that I used in the classroom and you will get a sense of the essays: unapologetically confessional, self-absorbed, self-indulgent, but sometimes helpful and kind of interesting.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Teaching folklore at Western Kentucky was the most satisfying period in my professional life thanks to all, both students and colleagues. I'd be happy to hear from you:</p>
<p>Larry Danielson</p>
<p>330 West Prospect Ave.</p>
<p>Appleton, WI 54911</p>
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    [Added_By] => ann.ferrell
    [Added_Date] => 2017-12-04 14:03:10
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-02-21 17:26:01
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1521
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Tim
    [Last_Name] => Evans
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => tim.evans@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor, Folk Studies
    [Office] => FAC 245
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Graduate Courses:<br /> </span>ART/FLK 445: American Architectural History<br /> FLK 478: Folklore and Literature<br /> FLK 561: Folk Art and Technology<br /> FLK 562: Folklore and Education<br /> FLK 572: Public Folklore</p>
<p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Undergraduate Courses:</span><br />FLK 276: Introduction to Folk Studies<br />FLK 330: Cultural Connections and Diversity<br />FLK 373: Folklore and the Media<br />FLK 379: Topics in Folklore: Narratives of Horror and the Supernatural<br />FLK 445: American Architectural History<br />FLK 478: Folklore and Literature</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., Folklore/American Studies, Indiana University<br />M.A., Folklore, Indiana University<br />B.A., Anthropology, Colorado State University</p>
<p>I grew up in Colorado. In my 38 years as a folklorist, I have worked extensively in both academic and public folklore, including eight years as Wyoming State Folklorist. I have worked as a folklorist in Indiana, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Wyoming, Iowa, Nebraska and Kentucky. I have been at Western Kentucky University since 1999. I have served on numerous panels and boards related to public folklore, and on the executive board of the American Folklore Society.</p>
<p>Specialties/interests include public/applied folklore, folklore and education, material culture, folk art and architecture, American architectural history, the history of Folk Studies, the politics of culture, the American West, folklore and literature, the folkloresque, fan cultures, new media, and fantasy/science fiction. My research and publications include work on public folklore, the American West, western saddlemaking, Wyoming barns, the Arts and Crafts Movement, contemporary/internet legends, the writer/designer/socialist William Morris, and science fiction/fantasy writers including H. P. Lovecraft, Philip K. Dick, and Neil Gaiman.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Selected Publications</p>
<p>&ldquo;The Bowling Green Massacre: Fake News, Narrative and Counter-Narrative,&rdquo; <em>Journal of American Folklore</em>, forthcoming.</p>
<p>&ldquo;Slender Man, H. P. Lovecraft, and the Dynamics of Horror Cultures,&rdquo; in <em>Creepypasta as Digital Legendry: The Case of Slender Man</em>, ed. Trevor J. Blank and Lynne S. McNeill. Logan: Utah State University Press, forthcoming.</p>
<p>2015. &ldquo;Folklore, Intertextuality and the Folkloresque in the Works of Neil Gaiman,&rdquo; in <em>The Folkloresque: Reframing Folklore in a Popular Culture World</em>, ed. Michael Foster and Jeffrey Tolbert. Logan: Utah State University Press, 2015.</p>
<p>2010. "Authenticity, Ethnography, and Colonialism in Philip K. Dick&rsquo;s The Man in the High Castle."&nbsp;<em>Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts</em>&nbsp;21(3):366-383.</p>
<p>2006. "Piece-Sur-Piece Horse Barns on the Laramie Plains of Southeastern Wyoming: Cultural Interplay and Adaptation."&nbsp;<em>Material Culture</em>&nbsp;38(1):54-87.</p>
<p>2005. "A Last Defense Against the Dark: Folklore, Horror and the Uses of Tradition in the Works of H. P. Lovecraft."&nbsp;<em>Journal of Folklore Research</em>&nbsp;42(1):99-135.</p>
<p>2004. "Tradition and Illusion: Antiquarianism, Tourism and Horror in H. P. Lovecraft."&nbsp;<em>Extrapolation&nbsp;</em>45(2):176-195.</p>
<p><a href="http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/432"><em>1998. King of the Western Saddle: the Sheridan Saddle and the Art of Don King</em>. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.</a></p>
<p>1988. "Folklore As Utopia: English Medievalists and the Ideology of Revivalism."&nbsp;<em>Western Folklore</em>&nbsp;47(4):245-268.</p>
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    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 08:24:01
    [Edited_By] => kate.horigan
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:22:14
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(
    [MemberID] => 1523
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Ann K.
    [Last_Name] => Ferrell
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => ann.ferrell@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor, Folk Studies & Program Director
    [Office] => FAC 272
    [Phone] => 270 745-5896
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Graduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 480G: Women&rsquo;s Folklife<br />FLK 569: Folklore Genres<br />FLK 571: Folk Narrative<br />FLK 577: Folklore Theory<br />FLK 578: Folklore Fieldwork<br />FLK&nbsp;585: Topics in Folklore: Foodways</p>
<p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Undergraduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 276: Introduction to Folk Studies<br />FLK 371: Urban Folklore<br />FLK 373: Folklore and the Media<br />FLK 388:&nbsp;Foodways<br />FLK 480: Women&rsquo;s Folklife</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., English/Folklore, Ohio State University<br />M.A., Folk Studies, Western Kentucky University<br />B.A., Women&rsquo;s Studies, State University of New York at New Paltz</p>
<p>My research interests include narrative, rhetorics of tradition and heritage, gendered knowledge, and land-based occupations, as well as history of the field. My recent and ongoing fieldwork has been with Kentucky burley tobacco farmers and members of the organization Kentucky Women in Agriculture. In addition to my academic work, I have experience in public folklore and with non-profit and governmental women&rsquo;s organizations.</p>
<p>I currently serve as Editor-in-Chief of the<a href="http://www.afsnet.org/?page=JAF"> Journal of American Folklore</a>.</p>
<p><a href="http://www.burleythebook.com">http://www.burleythebook.com</a></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p class="p1">2014. "Cutting a Thousand Sticks of Tobacco Makes a Boy a Man: Traditionalized Performances of Masculinity in Occupational Contexts." In&nbsp;<em>Unsettling Assumptions: Tradition, Gender, Drag,&nbsp;</em>eds. Pauline Greenhill and Diane Tye. Logan: Utah State University Press.</p>
<p class="p1"><a href="https://burleythebook.com/">2013.<em>&nbsp;Burley: Kentucky Tobacco in a New Century</em>. Lexington:University Press of Kentucky.&nbsp;Paperback edition, 2016.</a></p>
<p class="p1">2012. "Doing Masculinity: Gendered Challenges to Replacing Burley Tobacco in Central Kentucky."&nbsp;<em>Agriculture and Human Values&nbsp;</em>29(2):137-149.</p>
<p>2012. &ldquo;&lsquo;It&rsquo;s really hard to tell the true story of tobacco&rsquo;: Stigma, Tellability, and Reflexive Scholarship.&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Journal of Folklore Research&nbsp;</em>49(2):127-152.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 08:28:31
    [Edited_By] => ann.ferrell
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-30 12:22:38
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4969
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Tim
    [Last_Name] => Frandy
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => tim.frandy@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor, Folk Studies
    [Office] => FAC 312
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p class="Body"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Graduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 560: Cultural Conservation<br />FLK 470/470G: Museum Procedures and Preservation Techniques&nbsp;</p>
<p class="Body"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Undergraduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 276: Intro to Folk Studies<br />FLK 388: Foodways</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p class="Default">Ph.D., Scandinavian Studies/Folklore, University of Wisconsin-Madison<br />M.A., Scandinavian Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison<br />M.A., English, Washington State University<br />B.A., English, Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point&nbsp;</p>
<p class="Default">My research interests include public and applied folklore, environmental and medical humanities, museum studies, worldview and knowledge traditions, cultural sustainability and revitalization, and resistance and decolonization movements. While working with diverse peoples in the Western Great Lakes region and the Nordic countries, I&rsquo;ve collaborated with subsistence traditions, reindeer herders, traditional artists and storytellers, activists, musicians, traditional healers, and Indigenous cultural revitalization. My forthcoming book, <em>Stories from Aanaar: Inari S&aacute;mi Oral Tradition</em>, will be the first anthology of S&aacute;mi oral tradition published in the English language. My following book project will involve a series of public folklore programs I helped design and implement in the Lac du Flambeau Anishinaabe community in partnership with traditional artist and educator Wayne Valliere and the Lac du Flambeau Public School.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p class="Body">Forthcoming 2018. <em>Stories from Aanaar: Inari S&aacute;mi Oral Tradition</em>. Editor &amp; Translator. A.V. Koskimies &amp; T. Itkonen, compilers. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.</p>
<p class="Body">2017. &ldquo;Sustainable Power: Decolonizing Colonial Sustainabilities through Anishinaabe Birchbark Canoe Building.&rdquo; With B. Marcus Cederstr&ouml;m. In <a href="http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319571645">Going Beyond&mdash;Perceptions of Sustainability in Heritage Studies</a><em> No. 2, e</em>d. Marie-Theres Albert. Berlin: Springer, 217-230.</p>
<p class="Body">2016. &ldquo;Heritage Repatriation and Educational Sovereignty at an Ojibwe Public School.&rdquo; With B. Marcus Cederstr&ouml;m, Thomas A. DuBois, and Colin Connors. <a href="http://locallearningnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/JFEv3.pdf">Journal of Folklore and Education</a><em> </em>3: 31-41.</p>
<p class="Body">2015. &ldquo;Suden Kaikki Nimet: Sudet ja Dekolonisaatio Saamenmaassa&rdquo; [&ldquo;All of the Wolf&rsquo;s Names: Wolves and Decolonization in S&aacute;pmi&rdquo;]. In <a href="https://lauda.ulapland.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/62025/Suden_kanssa_pdfA.pdf?sequence=2">Suden Kanssa</a>, eds. Outi Ratam&auml;ki, Juha Hiedanp&auml;&auml;. Rovaniemi. Finland: University of Lapland Press, 42-65. <br /> <br /> 2013. &ldquo;Revitalization, Radicalization, and Reconstructed Meanings: The Folklore of Resistance During the Wisconsin Uprising.&rdquo; <em>Western Folklore</em><em> </em>72(3-4): 122-41.</p>
<p class="Body">2013. &ldquo;Examining Augmented Reality as a Platform for Situated Ethnography Through the Lens of the ARIS <em>Wisconsin Uprising </em>Game.&rdquo; With Carrie Roy. <em>Journal of American Folklore </em>126(499):70-78.<br /> <br /> 2011. &ldquo;Skiing Down the Demon Wolf: Redefinition of the Predator in Johan Turi&rsquo;s S&aacute;pmi.&rdquo; <em>Scandinavian Studies </em>83(4) 545-72. <br /> <br /> 2010. &ldquo;Lust, Labor and Lawlessness: The Bad Finn in Finnish-American Folksong.&rdquo; <em>Journal of Finnish Studies </em>14(1):29-45.</p>
<p>2009. &ldquo;Ecology and Identity in the Northwoods: Finnish-American Poaching Techniques and Narratives.&rdquo; In <em>Wild Games: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Hunting and Fishing in North </em>America, eds. Dennis Cutchins &amp; Eric Eliason. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 166-82.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => donna.schulte
    [Added_Date] => 2017-08-08 13:41:36
    [Edited_By] => kate.horigan
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:23:59
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5217
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Samantha
    [Last_Name] => Grace
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => samantha.grace@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Part-time Instructor (web), Anthropology
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>ANTH 120: Intro to Cultural Anthropology (web)</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D.,&nbsp;Anthropology, University of Arizona<br />M.A., Anthropology, University of Arizona<br />B.A.,&nbsp;Ancient Greek Language and Literature, Oberlin College</p>
<p>I am a cultural anthropologist&nbsp;specializing&nbsp;in Latin American citizenship, education, and life course, and my&nbsp;background includes&nbsp;linguistic anthropology&nbsp;and&nbsp;medical anthropology. My ethnographic&nbsp;research in urban Ecuador&nbsp;shows how students and their families negotiate the rights and responsibilities of citizenship through their age identities. The policies of Ecuador's "educational revolution" have changed the calculus for youth responsibilities, and those changes reach out to impact parents and grandparents as well. Time, changing bodies, family roles, and social structures like schools all work together to shape age identity in intersection with gender, race, and class. Age - particularly the anticipation and memory of identities that change through time - is a powerful tool for governments to hold populations accountable for the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.</p>
<p><a href="http://samanthalgrace.wordpress.com">http://samanthalgrace.wordpress.com</a></p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p>2016. Grace, Samantha L. &ldquo;How Old Am I? A Methodological Solution.&rdquo; <em>Neos</em> 8, no. 2 (October): 4. <a href="http://acyig.americananthro.org/neos/current-issue/">http://acyig.americananthro.org/neos/current-issue/</a>&nbsp;</p>
<p>2016. Grace, Samantha L. &ldquo;Changing How? Concerns of a Pregnant Anthropologist,&rdquo; <em>Arizona Anthropologist</em> 27 (October).&nbsp;</p>
<p>2013. Hingle, Melanie, Mimi Nichter, Melanie Medeiros, and Samantha Grace. Texting for Health: The Use of Participatory Methods to Develop Healthy Lifestyle Messages for Teens. <em>Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior</em> 45, no. 1.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => donna.schulte
    [Added_Date] => 2018-01-22 16:11:07
    [Edited_By] => chloe.brown257
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-06-11 13:55:28
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 5216
    [Prefix] => Mr.
    [First_Name] => Matthew
    [Last_Name] => Hale
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => matthew.hale@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Part-time Instructor (web), Folk Studies
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>FLK 373: Folklore and the Media (web)</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D, Communication and Culture Department<br />Ph.D, Folklore and Ethnomusicology Department, Indiana University, Ancitipated May 2018<br />M.A., Folklore Studies, Folk Studies and Anthropoloy Deparement, Western Kentucky University, 2010<br />B.A., Anthropology, Folk Studies and Anthropology Department, Western Kentucky University, 2008</p>
<p>Dr. Matthew Hale is currently a lecturer in the Department of Communication and Media at Kennesaw State University. His research interests include social theory, embodiment, material culture, labor, play, new media, audience reception, media industries, internet culture, documentary film and photography, gender, sexuality, and critical theory of everyday life.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Accepted for Publication 2018. &ldquo;Fabricating Fantasy: The Art and Craft of Cosplay.&rdquo; Essay to be published in&nbsp;<em>Dress.&nbsp;</em></p>
<p>2014. &ldquo;Cosplay: Intertextuality, Public Texts, and the Body Fantastic.&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Western Folklore&nbsp;</em>73(1): 5-37.</p>
<p>2013. &ldquo;Steampunk: Reimagining Trash and Technology.&rdquo; Invited Post for the Committee on the&nbsp;<em>Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing Blog.&nbsp;</em><a href="Accepted%20for%20Publication%202018.%20&ldquo;Fabricating%20Fantasy:%20The%20Art%20and%20Craft%20of%20Cosplay.&rdquo;%20Essay%20to%20be%20published%20in%20Dress.%20%20%202017.%20Book%20Review:%20Browine,%20Barbara%20and%20Danny%20Graydon.%20The%20Superhero%20Costume:%20Identity%20and%20Disguise%20in%20Face%20and%20Fiction.%20London:%20Bloomsbury%20Academic.%20Dress%2043(2):%20151-153.%20%202015.%20Book%20Review:%20Horst,%20Heather%20A.%20and%20Daniel%20Miller,%20eds.%202012.%20Digital%20Anthropology.%20London:%20Berg%20Publishers.%20Museum%20Anthropology%20Review%209(1-2):%20316.%20%202014.%20&ldquo;Cosplay:%20Intertextuality,%20Public%20Texts,%20and%20the%20Body%20Fantastic.&rdquo;%20Western%20Folklore%2073(1):%205-37.%20%202013.%20&ldquo;Steampunk:%20Reimagining%20Trash%20and%20Technology.&rdquo;%20Invited%20Post%20for%20the%20Committee%20on%20the%20Anthropology%20of%20Science,%20Technology,%20and%20Computing%20Blog.%20http://blog.castac.org/2013/08/%20steampunk-reimagining-trash-and-technology/.%20%202013.%20Book%20Review:%20Pinney,%20Christopher.%202011.%20Photography%20and%20Anthropology.%20London:%20Reakton%20Books%20Ltd.%20Journal%20of%20Folklore%20Research%20Reviews.%20https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/%20jfrr/article/view/3431/3198.%20%20%202013.%20&ldquo;Airship%20Captains,%20Pith%20Helmets,%20and%20Other%20Assorted%20Brassy%20Bits:%20Steampunk%20Personas%20and%20Material-Semiotics.&rdquo;%20New%20Directions%20in%20Folklore%20(11)1:%203-34.%20%202012.%20(Co-Authored%20Paper%20with%20Suzanne%20Barber).%20&ldquo;Enacting%20the%20Never-Was:%20Upcycling%20the%20Past,%20Present,%20and%20Future%20in%20Steampunk.&rdquo;%20In%20Steaming%20into%20a%20Victorian%20Future:%20A%20Steampunk%20Anthology.%20Cynthia%20Miller%20and%20Julie%20Taddeo,%20eds.%20Pp.%20165-184.%20Scarecrow%20Press.%20%202012.%20&ldquo;Shaping%20Theory,%20Bending%20Method,%20Tapping%20[New]%20Media:%20Ethnographic%20Craftsmanship%20and%20Responsive%20Design.&rdquo;%20Folklore%20Forum%2042(1):%201-22.%20https://folkloreforum.net/2012/08/13/%20shaping-theory-bending-method-tapping-new-media-ethnographic-craftsmanship-and-responsive-%20design/.%20">http://blog.castac.org/2013/08/ steampunk-reimagining-trash-and-technology/.</a></p>
<p>2013. &ldquo;Airship Captains, Pith Helmets, and Other Assorted Brassy Bits: Steampunk Personas and Material-Semiotics.&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>New Directions in Folklore&nbsp;</em>(11)1: 3-34.</p>
<p>2012. (Co-Authored Paper with Suzanne Barber). &ldquo;Enacting the Never-Was: Upcycling the Past, Present, and Future in Steampunk.&rdquo; In&nbsp;<em>Steaming into a Victorian Future: A Steampunk Anthology</em>. Cynthia Miller and Julie Taddeo, eds. Pp. 165-184. Scarecrow Press.</p>
<p>2012. &ldquo;Shaping Theory, Bending Method, Tapping [New] Media: Ethnographic Craftsmanship and Responsive Design.&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Folklore Forum&nbsp;</em>42(1): 1-22. <a href="https://folkloreforum.net/2012/08/13/%20shaping-theory-bending-method-tapping-new-media-ethnographic-craftsmanship-and-responsive-%20design/.%20">https://folkloreforum.net/2012/08/13/ shaping-theory-bending-method-tapping-new-media-ethnographic-craftsmanship-and-responsive- design/.&nbsp;</a></p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => donna.schulte
    [Added_Date] => 2018-01-22 16:07:06
    [Edited_By] => chloe.brown257
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-06-11 14:02:53
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 3595
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Kate
    [Last_Name] => Horigan
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => kate.horigan@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor, Folk Studies
    [Office] => FAC 235
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span>Graduate Courses:<br /></span></span>FLK 569: Folklore Genres<br />FLK 571: Folk Narrative</p>
<p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Undergraduate Courses:<br /></span>FLK 275: Supernatural Folklore<br />FLK 276: Intro to Folk Studies<br />FLK 330: Cultural Connections and Diversity<br />FLK 371: Urban Folklore<br />FLK 373: Folklore and the Media<br />FLK 379: Topics in Folkore: Folklore of Death and Disaster<br />FLK/ANTH 399: Field Methods in Ethnography</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., English/Folklore, Ohio State University<br />M.A., English, Tulane University<br />B.A., English, Tulane University&nbsp;</p>
<p>My research focuses on expressive culture in communities affected by conflict and disaster. My areas of interest and expertise include narrative, memory and commemoration, ethnography of communication, and critical trauma theory. My book <em><a title="Consuming Katrina" href="https://www.consumingkatrina.com/" target="_blank">Consuming Katrina: Public Disaster and Personal Narrative</a>&nbsp;</em>(UP Mississippi, 2018) describes how personal narratives and other forms of folk commemoration of Hurricane Katrina have been adapted for and received by public audiences. My current research explores memory and narration of war and genocide in Bosnia (1992-1995), especially among Bosnian refugees in Bowling Green, KY.&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p>2018. <a title="Consuming Katrina" href="https://www.consumingkatrina.com/" target="_blank"><em>Consuming Katrina: Public Disaster and Personal Narrative</em></a>. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.</p>
<p>2017. "Critical Empathy: A Survivor's Study of Disaster."&nbsp;<em>Fabula</em> 58(1-2).&nbsp;<a href="https://doi.org/10.1515/fabula-2017-0005">https://doi.org/10.1515/fabula-2017-0005</a>.</p>
<p>2015. &ldquo;Invoking the Relative: A New Perspective on Family Lore in Stigmatized Communities,&rdquo; with Sheila Bock. In&nbsp;<em>Diagnosing Folklore: Perspectives on Health, Trauma, and Disability</em>, ed.Trevor J. Blank and Andrea Kitta. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.</p>
<p>2015.&nbsp;&ldquo;Katrina Stories Get Graphic in <em>A.D.: New Orleans After the Deluge.</em>&rdquo; In&nbsp;<em>Ten Years after Katrina</em>,<em>&nbsp;</em>ed. Mary Ruth Marotte and Glenn Jellenik. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.</p>
<p>2014.&nbsp;&ldquo;From &lsquo;Angel of Mercy&rsquo; to &lsquo;Radical Muslim&rsquo;: Zeitoun&rsquo;s Story Travels.&rdquo; In&nbsp;<em>Mapping Generations&nbsp;</em><em>of Traumatic Memory in American Narratives</em>,<em>&nbsp;</em>ed. Dana Mihailescu, Roxana Oltean, and Mihaela Precup. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.</p>
<p>2010.&nbsp;&ldquo;Legends at Work, Post-Katrina.&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Harlot: A Revealing Look at the Arts of</em> <em>Persuasion</em> 5.</p>
<p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => 
    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2014-09-03 15:29:25
    [Edited_By] => kate.horigan
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:18:35
    [Show_Images] => 1
)
Array
(
    [MemberID] => 1525
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Jean-Luc
    [Last_Name] => Houle
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => jean-luc.houle@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor, Anthropology
    [Office] => FAC 280
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => http://westernmongoliaarchaeology.weebly.com/
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
    [Custom_Field2] => 
    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>ANTH 130: Introduction to Archaeology<br />ANTH 316: The Archaeology of Environmental Change<br />ANTH 333: Archaeology of Ancient China<br />ANTH 335: Old World Prehistory<br />ANTH 366: Special Topics: The Archaeologist Look at Death<br />ANTH 366: Special Topics: Fantastic Archaeology! or How to Make Sense of the Past<br />ANTH 432/432G: Field Course in Archaeology<br />ANTH 438: Archaeological Laboratory Methods<br />ANTH 495: Directed Study&nbsp;</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., Anthropology/Archaeology, University of Pittsburgh<br />M.Sc., Anthropology/Archaeology, Universit&eacute; de Montr&eacute;al<br />B.Sc., Anthropology/Archaeology, Universit&eacute; de Montr&eacute;al&nbsp;</p>
<p>I am an anthropological archaeologist whose research interests focus on the study of early complex societies with a particular emphasis on East Asia and the Eurasian steppe region. My goal as an anthropological archaeologist is to explore the processes that maintain and transform sociocultural systems. I am particularly interested in the relationship between mobility and place-making, and I see my research as a broader effort in the social sciences to study the interactions linking human mobility, territorial behavior, and the development of complex social organizations. Specifically, my research focuses on the social and ritual construction of landscapes and the sense of territoriality among mobile pastoralists, as well as on human-environment relationships and how all this relates to the development of complex societies in Inner Asia. These interests have led me to investigate variables affecting changes in political economy, subsistence practices, mobility patterns, and the causes of the development of increasingly complex societies and social inequality among mobile pastoralists in Mongolia. I approach this broad research focus from an anthropological perspective utilizing principles of cultural ecology and geography in order to evaluate the limitations and opportunities that the environment (both natural and cultural) imposes on the sociocultural evolution of these human societies. In order to accomplish this, I engage in multiscalar and multidisciplinary research that combines regional and landscape archaeology, household archaeology, quantitative and spatial analysis, geoarchaeology, palaeobotany, zooarchaeology, and GIS. My research projects also include a significant ethnoarchaeological component aimed at a better understanding of human-animal relationships and the relationship between humans and their environment, both in the past and present. Finally, my research projects in Mongolia have always included local and international students, including students from WKU. As fieldwork is an important element of my research, my professional goals include continuing to incorporate students in my research projects, providing them with hands-on experience in the field and opportunities to publish and present at various local, regional, and international conferences.</p>
<p><strong>&nbsp;</strong>I am currently the<strong> </strong>director of the WKU Anthropology Lab.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p><a href="http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199935413.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199935413-e-20" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2016. Bronze Age Mongolia. <em>Oxford Handbooks Online in Archaeology</em>.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/b9789004325470_008" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2016. Long-Term Occupation and Seasonal Mobility in Mongolia: A comparative analysis of two mobile pastoralist communities. In <em>Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics: The Archaeology of Eurasia from Past to Present</em>, edited by Kathryn Weber, Emma Hite, Adam T. Smith, and Lori Khatchadourian. Oxford University Press.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/25233451/The_Killing_Season_Ethnographic_and_Zooarchaeological_Perspectives_on_Residential_Mobility_in_Bronze_Age_Mongolia_In_People_with_Animals_Perspectives_and_Studies_in_Ethnozooarchaeology_PDF_available_upon_Request_" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2016. The Killing Season: Ethnographic and Zooarchaeological Perspectives on Residential Mobility in Bronze Age Mongolia. In <em>People with Animals: Perspectives and Studies in Ethnozooarchaeology</em>, edited by Lee G. Broderick. Oxford, Oxbow Books Ltd.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/9677196/Lambs_to_the_Slaughter_A_Zooarchaeological_Investigation_of_Stone_Circles_in_Mongolia_early_view_online_" target="_blank">Broderick, Lee. G., Oula Seitsonen, Jamsranjav Bayarsaikhan, and Jean-Luc Houle, 2016. Lambs to the Slaughter: A Zooarchaeological Investigation of Stone Circles in Mongolia. <em>International Journal of Osteoarchaeology</em> 26:537-543.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/17803231/Occupation_de_longue_dur%C3%A9e_et_mobilit%C3%A9_saisonni%C3%A8re_en_Mongolie" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2015. Occupation de longue dur&eacute;e et mobilit&eacute; saisonni&egrave;re en Mongolie. In <em>Les syst&egrave;mes de mobilit&eacute; de la Pr&eacute;histoire au Moyen &Acirc;ge</em>. <em>XXXVe rencontres internationales d&rsquo;arch&eacute;ologie et d&rsquo;histoire d&rsquo;Antibes</em>. Sous la direction de N. Naudinot, L. Meignen, D. Binder, G. Querr&eacute;. &Eacute;ditions APDCA, Antibes, 2015.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/10156034/The_Mystery_of_the_Missing_Caprines_Stone_Circles_at_the_Great_Khirigsuur_in_the_Khanuy_Valley" target="_blank">Broderick, Lee. G., Jean-Luc Houle, Oula Seitsonen, and Jamsranjav Bayarsaikhan, 2015. The Mystery of the Missing Caprines: Stone Circles at the Great Khirigsuur in the Khanuy Valley. <em>Studia Archaeologica</em> 34 (&#1040;&#1088;&#1093;&#1077;&#1086;&#1083;&#1086;&#1075;&#1080;&#1081;&#1085; C&#1091;&#1076;&#1083;&#1072;&#1083;).</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/6965872/_GIS_Approaches_to_Past_Mobility_and_Accessibility_An_Example_from_the_Bronze_Age_Khanuy_Valley_Mongolia_2014_" target="_blank">Seitsonen, Oula, Jean-Luc Houle, and Lee G. Broderick, 2014.&nbsp; GIS Approaches to Past Mobility and Accessibility: An Example from the Bronze Age Khanuy Valley, Mongolia.&nbsp; In <em>Past Mobilities: Archaeological Approaches to Movement and Mobility</em>, edited by Jim Leary. &nbsp;Farnham, UK: Ashgate Publishing (now Routledge).</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/17094977/Mongolia_Archaeological_Heritage" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc and Jamsranjav Bayarsaikhan, 2014. The Archaeological Heritage of Mongolia. <em>Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology</em>. Springer.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/2580166/More_than_Just_Horse_Dietary_Breadth_and_Subsistence_in_Bronze_Age_Central_Mongolia" target="_blank">Broderick, Lee G. and Jean-Luc Houle, 2012<em>. </em>More than Just Horse: Dietary Breadth and Subsistence in Bronze Age Central Mongolia. <em>Mongolian Journal of Archaeology, Anthropology and Ethnology</em>, Vol. 7 (1):149-157.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199735785.001.0001/acref-9780199735785-e-0601?rskey=eiir4t&amp;result=2" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2012. Entry for 'Archaeology of Mongolia'. <em>The Oxford Companion to Archaeology</em>, Oxford University Press, Oxford.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/8295617/Settlement_Patterns_and_Domestic_Economy_of_the_Xiongnu_in_Khanuy_Valley_Mongolia" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc and Lee G. Broderick, 2011. Settlement Patterns and Domestic Economy of the Xiongnu in Khanuy Valley, Mongolia. In <em>Xiongnu Archaeology: Multidisciplinary Perspectives of the First Steppe Empire of Inner Asia</em>, edited by Ursula Brosseder and Bryan K. Miller. Bonn Contributions to Asian Archaeology, vol.5. Bonn: Bonn University Press.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/8295276/Socially_Integrative_Facilities_and_the_Emergence_of_Societal_Complexity_on_the_Mongolian_Steppe" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2009. &lsquo;Socially Integrative Facilities&rsquo; and the Emergence of Societal Complexity on the Mongolian Steppe. In <em>Monuments, Metals and Mobility: Trajectories of Complexity in the Late Prehistory of the Eurasian Steppe</em>, edited by Bryan K. Hanks, and K. M. Linduff. Cambridge University Press.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.vfgarch.uni-bonn.de/veroeffentlichungen/bonn-bonn-contributions-to-asian-archaeology/BCAA4%20TOC" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc, 2009. Investigating Mobility, Territoriality and Complexity in the Late Bronze Age: A Perspective from Monuments and Settlements. In <em>Current Archaeological Research in Mongolia. Papers from the First International Conference on &lsquo;Archaeological Research in Mongolia&rsquo;</em>, edited by J. Bemmann, H. Parzinger, E. Pohl, and D. Tseveendorj. Bonn Contributions on Asian Archaeology 4, Bonn, Germany.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="http://www.saa.org/portals/0/saa/publications/thesaaarchrec/may2009.pdf" target="_blank">Houle, Jean-Luc and Diimaajav Erdenebaatar, 2009. Taking Small Steppes: Conducting Graduate-Level Collaborative Research in Mongolia. <em>The SAA Archaeological Record</em> 8(2):22-24&mdash;Special Issue: International collaborative research in East and Southeast Asia.</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <a href="https://www.academia.edu/3893693/Beyond_the_Steppe_and_the_Sown_edited_by_David_Peterson_Laura_Popova_and_Adam_T._Smith_-_2006" target="_blank">Allard, Francis, Diimaajav Erdenebaatar, and Jean-Luc Houle, 2006. Recent Archaeological Research in the Khanuy River Valley, Central Mongolia. In <em>Beyond the Steppe and the Sown: Proceedings of the 2002 University of Chicago Conference on Eurasian Archaeology</em>, edited by David L. Peterson, Laura M. Popova and Adam T. Smith., Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers.</a></p>
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Kate
    [Last_Name] => Hudepohl
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => kate.hudepohl@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Associate Professor, Anthropology
    [Office] => FAC 235
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Custom_Value2] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>ANTH 120: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology<br />ANTH 125: Introduction to Biological Anthropology<br />ANTH 305: Paleoanthropology<br />ANTH 342: Peoples &amp; Cultures of the Caribbean<br />ANTH 343: Anthropology of Gender<br />ANTH 382: Medical Anthropology<br />ANTH 399: Field Methods in Ethnography<br />ANTH 442: Ecological and Economic Anthropology<br />ANTH 446: Anthropology of Religion<br />ANTH 495: Directed Study</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>I am a sociocultural anthropologist with broad four-field training. Some of my research occurs in the Caribbean where I've been working with the Kalinago community of Dominica to document their efforts at ethnic revitalization. The Kalinago are one of the last indigenous communities in the Caribbean, and it is interesting to observe how their identity has changed in recent years due to outside influences such as tourism and contact with other indigenous groups. I also have several local projects in Bowling Green. Undergraduate students have been helping me conduct a cemetery documentation project in two local cemeteries. With the help of students, I've also undertaken an oral history project interviewing women who attended WKU in the 1950s to find out what college life was like for them at that time. In addition to my teaching and research interests, I also serve as the faculty advisor for Lambda Alpha, the national honorary society for anthropology.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
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    [Prefix] => Mr.
    [First_Name] => Barry
    [Last_Name] => Kaufkins
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    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Instructor II, Folk Studies
    [Office] => FAC 113
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
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    [Added_By] => thomas.gaffin
    [Added_Date] => 2011-10-20 09:48:43
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:24:44
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Lynwood
    [Last_Name] => Montell
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    [Email] => ankf2000@yahoo.com
    [Hide_Email] => 1
    [Title] => Retired faculty, Folk Studies
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>William Lynwood Montell taught at Western Kentucky University from 1969 to 1999. He is the author of 22 books, including <em>Saga of Coe Ridge</em>, <em>Ghosts Along the Cumberlands</em>, <em>Don't Go Up Kettle Creek</em>, and <em>Singing the Glory Down</em>. He no longer teaches university classes, but continues writing books and doing lectures and storytelling presentations. For many years he has been featured as one of the statewide speakers sponsored by the Kentucky Humanities Council. Since his retirement he has published <em>Ghosts Across Kentucky</em> (2000), <em>Haunted Houses and Family Ghosts of Kentucky</em> (2001), <em>Tales From Kentucky Lawyers</em> (2003); <em>Tales From Tennessee Lawyers</em> (2005); <em>Reminisces and Reflections: African American in the Kentucky-Tennessee Upper Cumberland Since the Civil War</em> (with Wali Kharif, 2005); <em>Grassroots Music in the Upper Cumberland</em> (2006); <em>Tales from Kentucky Doctors</em> (2008); <em>Civil War in the Kentucky-Tennessee Upper Cumberland</em> (2008) and <em>Tales from Kentucky Funeral Directors</em> (2008).</p>
<p>In the summer of 2001, Lynwood was inducted into the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame, located in Renfro Valley, Kentucky, and in March 2003, he received the Governor's Arts Award in the Folk Heritage category, an award based on the books he has written that focus on local life and culture. In his words, 'As I tell people, I could care less writing about kings, queens, and presidents, I write about local culture, life, and times as described by persons whom I interview during the research/writing process.'</p>
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    [Added_By] => ann.ferrell
    [Added_Date] => 2017-12-04 14:09:33
    [Edited_By] => chloe.brown257
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-03-21 15:06:32
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(
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    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Johnston A. K.
    [Last_Name] => Njoku
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => johnston.njoku@wku.edu
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    [Title] => Retired faculty, Folk Studies
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    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => <p>Broadly, I am interested in the folklore of forced historical population movements, especially those resulting from the encroaching Sahara, the depletion of farmlands, wars in Africa, and the Atlantic slave trade. I am presently working on the transatlantic slave journeys of the Igbo people of Nigeria together with the issues of their forced relocations and settlement patterns, survival, and the establishment of Igbo community traditions on both sides of the Atlantic.&nbsp; Since 1999, I have been researching and writing about the material culture, verbal lore, and historical narratives of Igbo slave journeys from Nigeria to Virginia and through the Underground Railroad to freedom in the United States, as well as the reconnection of Africans and African Americans of Igbo descent long separated by the tragic events of Atlantic slave trade.&nbsp; Since 2006, I have been using relevant lessons from my folklore studies to help shape the preparedness of Igbo immigrants in America to reestablish their ethnic community tradition in the United States. I organize and facilitate reconnection events at the Igbo Farm Village in Staunton, Virginia. The Igbo Farm Village, an outdoor museum exhibit in Staunton provides a context very close to the Igbo cultural environment for experiencing and learning Igbo culture in America. I use the exhibit to run summer and weekend cultural immersion classes that reacquaint parents with their Igbo cultural heritage so that they can pass same on to their American born children<em>. </em>Although the cultural immersion workshops at the Igbo Farm Village<em>&nbsp;</em>are Igbo-centered, I also draw from my 20 years of experience in teaching cultural diversity in the United States to anchor my presentations within the greater American multiethnic and multicultural heritage. Because the Igbo Farm Village is in the midst of English, Irish, and German farms that showcase the contributions of Old World cultures to the development of the American frontier culture, there could not be a better location in the United States for achieving my goal.&nbsp;<em>&nbsp;</em></p>
    [Section_Field2] => Publications
    [Section_Value2] => <p>&ldquo;Before the Middle Passage: Igbo Slave Journeys to Old Calabar and Bonny&rdquo;&nbsp;<em>Repercussions of the Atlantic Slave Trade: The Interior of the Bight of Biafra and the African Diaspora</em>, edited by Carolyn Brown and Paul Lovejoy. Trenton, New Jersey: Africa World Press (2011) 57-69.</p>
<p>Amamihe: The Basis of Igbo Culture and Character formation.Goldline and Jacobs Publishers, NJ, Canada, and Owerri, 2010.</p>
<p>ENYI BIAFRA: Regimental Drill, Duty Songs, and Cadences from Biafra. Goldline and Jacobs Publishers, NJ and Owerri, 2009.</p>
<p>&ldquo;The Atlantic Slave Trade, Colonialism, Gender, and Class Transformations in the Bight of Biafra Hinterland&rdquo; in&nbsp;<em>Olaudah Equano and the World</em>. Edited by Chima Korieh. Africa World Press, (2009), pp. 203-217.</p>
<p>&ldquo;Civil Society Practices among the Igbo People of Nigeria,&rdquo; in&nbsp;<em>Comparative Perspective of Civil Society,</em>&nbsp;edited by Robert Dibie. Lexington Books 2008, pp. 209-223</p>
<p>Oral tradition and the material culture of the Atlantic slave trade as historical source: evidence from the Bight of Biafra hinterland. In&nbsp;The Aftermath of Slavery: Transitions and Transformations in Southeastern Nigeria. Edited by Chima J. Korieh and Femi J. Kolapo. Trenton, NJ: African World Press, Inc. 2007, pp. 136-157.<strong>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</strong></p>
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    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 08:38:21
    [Edited_By] => kate.horigan
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:25:32
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    [MemberID] => 5197
    [Prefix] => Ms.
    [First_Name] => Theresa
    [Last_Name] => Osborne
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => theresa.osborne@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Part-time instructor, Folk Studies
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>FLK 388: Foodways (web)</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Theresa Osborne is a 2004 graduate of the WKU Folk Studies graduate program, where her focus was on public folklore. She has been teaching an online section of Cultural Diversity in the US for the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology as an adjunct part-time faculty since 2005.</p>
<p>Born and raised in central Kentucky, Theresa moved to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the early 1990's. "I fell in love with the people and then place, and I decided to make my home here. But when I decided to go back to graduate school I chose Western. I first came to WKU to study journalism. I was impressed with the caliber of the faculty and the quality of instruction." After completing her graduate studies she was offered the opportunity to teach an online course as an adjunct. "I jumped at the chance. I consider it to be an honor to be a part of Western's faculty, even in a part-time position. I came to Western as a non-traditional student. I had spent several years living and traveling in Europe. I also worked for several years as a community journalist. I think I bring a unique and different perspective and set of experiences to my online students."</p>
<p>In addition to her work at WKU, Theresa has been involved with a community performance project called Higher Ground for the past seven years. "This project allows me to use the skills I gained from Western's Folk Studies program. Our theater productions are all created out of stories gathered from local people and address the actual issues and problems that face each of us on a day to day basis, while celebrating what is unique and valuable in our culture." The Higher Ground project was the subject of a KET documentary that continues to be aired periodically. Theresa is also a professional storyteller. "I have a son, daughters, grandchildren and an egg-sucking dog. They all provide me with material for my stories."</p>
<p>For the past three years she has worked in partnership with Phyllis Sizemore the curator of the Kentucky Coal Museum in Benham, KY, to produce a weekly radio show called History Alive. The show airs on WMMT and its online radio program. "Phyllis and I both have a love of local history as told through the stories of local people. With this in mind, we began to record weekly radio shows with local people telling their stories and, in the process, the stories of our place. These programs are informal discussions that often result in laughter and sometimes tears. Our goal is to always show through these interviews that our history is alive and held in the hearts and stories of everyday people. To learn about this history, in most cases all you have to do is ask them to tell their story."</p>
<p>In her spare time, she and her family make regular trips to Belize, Central America to continue mission outreach work they began there 13 years ago. "While I love my mountains here in Kentucky. I have a second home and family in the people of Belize."</p>
<p>Theresa is a Kentucky Community Scholar and member of the Kentucky Oral History Commission.</p>
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    [Edited_Date] => 2018-03-21 15:08:15
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    [Prefix] => Ms.
    [First_Name] => Donna
    [Last_Name] => Schulte
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => donna.schulte@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Office Associate
    [Office] => FAC 237
    [Phone] => 270 745-5295
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Added_By] => michael.williams
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    [Edited_By] => donna.schulte
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-01-14 14:23:03
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(
    [MemberID] => 4600
    [Prefix] => Ms.
    [First_Name] => Virginia
    [Last_Name] => Siegel
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => virginia.siegel@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Folklife Specialist, Kentucky Folklife Program
    [Office] => Pioneer Log Cabin
    [Phone] => 270 745-4133
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
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    [Custom_Value2] => 
    [Custom_Field3] => 
    [Custom_Value3] => 
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    [Section_Value1] => 
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>M.A., Folk Studies, Western Kentucky University<br />B.F.A., Historic Preservation, Savannah College of Art and Design</p>
<p>As Folklife Specialist for the <a title="Kentucky Folklife Program" href="https://kentuckyfolklife.org/" target="_blank">Kentucky Folklife Program</a>, I research and document the folklife of Kentucky and oversee our mission to "document, present, and conserve the diverse traditional culture and heritage of the Commonwealth."&nbsp; More recently, our focus has centered on the traditional arts and stories of the Bosnian American diaspora in Kentucky.&nbsp; Additional research interests include historic preservation, architectural history, and vernacular architecture (including traditional cultural properties).&nbsp; I am also interested in Chinese folklife and language. &#25105;&#35828;&#19968;&#28857;&#20013;&#25991;&#65292;&#25105;&#22312;&#23398;&#20013;&#25991;&#12290; &#24456;&#39640;&#20852;&#35748;&#35782;&#24744;&#65281;</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Siegel, Virginia and Michael Ann Williams. 2017. "Folklife and Historic Preservation." In&nbsp;<em><a title="Rowman &amp; Littlefield " href="https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442272910/Folklife-and-Museums-Twenty-First-Century-Perspectives#" target="_blank">Folklife and Museums: Twenty-First-Century Perspectives</a><em>,&nbsp;</em></em>eds. C. Kurt Dewhurst, Patricia Hall, and Charlie Seemann. New York: Rowman &amp; Littlefield.</p>
<p>Bj&ouml;rkman, Brent and Virginia Siegel. 2016. "The Kentucky Folklife Program and the Kentucky Museum at Western Kentucky University."&nbsp;<a title="Journal of Folklore and Education" href="http://www.locallearningnetwork.org/journal-of-folklore-and-education/current-and-past-issues/journal-of-folklore-and-education-volume-3-2016/" target="_blank"><em>Journal of Folklore and Education </em>3:113-118</a>.</p>
<p>Williams, Michael Ann (&#39759;&#26757;&#23433;) and Virginia Siegel (&#33487;&#21513;&#38597;). 2017. "&#27665;&#38388;&#29983;&#27963;&#19982;&#21382;&#21490;&#24314;&#31569;&#20445;&#25252;: &#20256;&#32479;&#25991;&#21270;&#22330;&#25152;&#21644;&#20811;&#37324;&#22885;&#32599;&#20154;&#30340;&#26519;&#23380;&#23567;&#23627;." <em>&#25991;&#21270;&#36951;&#20135; (&ldquo;Cultural Heritage&rdquo;)</em> 2017&#24180;06&#26399;. Translated by &#38472;&#29081; . <br /><br /></p>
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    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2016-09-14 14:47:34
    [Edited_By] => virginia.siegel
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-02-07 10:43:16
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Array
(
    [MemberID] => 4695
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Ashley
    [Last_Name] => Stinnett
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => ashley.stinnett@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Assistant Professor, Anthropology
    [Office] => FAC 310
    [Phone] => 270 745-6549
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
    [Custom_Field1] => 
    [Custom_Value1] => 
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    [Custom_Value2] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p>ANTH 120: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology<br /> ANTH 135: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology<br /> ANTH 388: Foodways<br /> ANTH 448: Visual Anthropology<br /> ANTH 449: Ethnographic Video Production<br /> ANTH 495: Directed Study</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Arizona<br />M.A., Anthropology, University of Arizona<br />B.A., Anthropology, &nbsp;University of Arizona</p>
<p>My research interests include Applied Anthropology (community-based participatory research, applied methodology, food systems),&nbsp;Linguistic Anthropology (narrative networks and complexity theory, sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics, multivocality, occupational discourses, public &amp; mediatized discourses), and&nbsp;Visual Anthropology (applied visual anthropology<strong>,</strong> language &ndash; visual interaction, sensory ethnography).</p>
<p>The geographic areas that I work in are the Southwestern US, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p>Stinnett, Ashley and Jennifer J. Thompson. (in print, 2018). Introduction: Ethnographic accounts of &lsquo;the middle&rsquo; in anthropological studies of agri(culture). <em>Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment</em>. Special Issue.</p>
<p>Thompson, Jennifer J. and Ashley Stinnett. (in print, 2018). Confronting the Goldilocks Problem: Encountering &ldquo;The Middle&rdquo; in Anthropological Studies of Food and Agriculture. <em>Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment</em>. Special Issue.</p>
<p>Stinnett, Ashley. (Summer 2018) <a title="What's In Your Bag, Anthropologists?" href="http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2018/07/18/whats-in-your-bag-anthropologists-2/" target="_blank">What's In Your Bag, Anthropologists?</a> <em>Anthropology News</em>.</p>
<p>Maisa C. Taha, Ashley Stinnett, and Elizabeth Peacock. (2017, Fall Issue). A Sandrizona Retrospective: From the Desert to the Ocean and Back Again.&nbsp;<em>Arizona Anthropologist</em>. Invited.</p>
<p>Stinnett, Ashley. (<em>in review</em>, From the cut n&rsquo; wrap to the fabrication floor: Heritage butcher discourse in a shifting meat industry.&nbsp;<em>Journal of Sociolinguistics</em>. Special Issue.</p>
<p>Stinnett, Ashley. (in preparation). <em>Heritage Butchers at Work: Discourses of Blood, Artistry and Tradition in the American Southwest</em>. Routledge Innovative Ethnographies Series.</p>
<p>Mendoza-Denton, N. and Ashley Stinnett. (under contract).<em> Introduction to</em> V<em>isual and Multimedia Ethnography</em>. Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.</p>
    [Section_Field4] => Selected Filmography
    [Section_Value4] => <p><a title="Biking in Amsterdam 360&deg; (Summer 2018)" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsF821fKjj0&amp;t=1s" target="_blank">Biking In Amsterdam, 360</a>&nbsp;(2018)</p>
<p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTGVs_Eqz0s">Pima County Public Library - Seed Library How-To</a>&nbsp;(2016)</p>
<p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aW2_b_oGo4Q">Growing Together: Las Milpitas de Cottonwood Community Farm</a> (2015)</p>
<p><a href="https://www.library.pima.gov/welcome-videos/">Pima County Public Library &ndash; Welcome to the Library</a> (2013)</p>
<p>The Rivers &amp; Canyons of the Colorado: Southern Paiute Monitoring &amp; Education (2011)</p>
<p>Woven Together: Southern Paiute Weaving Traditions (2009)</p>
<p>Connecting to the Past: Ancient Technologies of the Tucson Basin (2009)</p>
    [Staff_Website] => 
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    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => ashley.stinnett
    [Added_Date] => 2016-11-29 11:11:17
    [Edited_By] => ashley.stinnett
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-08-28 13:51:06
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    [MemberID] => 1527
    [Prefix] => Dr.
    [First_Name] => Michael Ann
    [Last_Name] => Williams
    [Suffix] => 
    [Email] => michael.williams@wku.edu
    [Hide_Email] => 0
    [Title] => Retired faculty, Folk Studies
    [Office] => 
    [Phone] => 
    [Website] => 
    [CV] => 
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    [Section_Field1] => Courses
    [Section_Value1] => <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Graduate Courses:</span><br />FLK 464/464G Vernacular Architecture<br />FLK 470/470G Museum Procedures and Preservation Techniques<br />FLK 560 Cultural Conservation<br />FLK 561 Folk Art<br />FLK 577 Folklore Theory<br />FLK 585 Topics: Foodways</p>
    [Section_Field2] => Background and Interests
    [Section_Value2] => <p>Ph.D., Folklore and Folklife, University of Pennsylvania<br />M.A., Folklore and Folklife, University of Pennsylvania<br />B.A., Anthropology, Franklin and Marshall College</p>
<p>I have taught folklore at Western Kentucky University since 1986. In 2004, I became the head of the newly created Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology. My research interests have included social and symbolic use of space in vernacular architecture, government policy and its impact on Appalachian communities, and cultural representation and the staging of tradition. I have also worked on various applied projects with my graduate students, including&nbsp;an oral history project documenting the former logging town of Ravensford, North Carolina, part of a larger cultural resource documentation effort accompanying a transfer of land from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. I have served as chair of the Kentucky Historic Preservation Review Board from 1993-2005 and I am an advisor to the Kentucky Oral History Commission. I have also been an active member of the Vernacular Architecture Forum, formerly serving as the newsletter editor and as a vice-president and board member.&nbsp; From 2014-2015, I was President of the American Folklore Society.</p>
    [Section_Field3] => Selected Publications
    [Section_Value3] => <p><a href="http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/93wrp8ky9780252031021.html">2006.&nbsp;Staging Tradition: John Lair and Sarah Gertrude Knott. Champaign: University of Illinois Press.</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/1821">2004.&nbsp;Homeplace: The Social Use and Meaning of the Folk Dwelling in Southwestern North Carolina. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. Paperback edition.</a>&nbsp;</p>
<p><a href="http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/364">1995.&nbsp;Great Smoky Mountains Folklife, Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.</a></p>
    [Section_Field4] => 
    [Section_Value4] => <div class="main_right_container">
<div class="main" style="width: 735px;">
<p>&nbsp;</p>
</div>
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    [Staff_Website] => 
    [Unique_Department] => 0
    [Active] => 1
    [Added_By] => michael.williams
    [Added_Date] => 2011-08-04 08:41:40
    [Edited_By] => kate.horigan
    [Edited_Date] => 2018-07-03 12:27:12
    [Show_Images] => 1
)

Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology Faculty and Staff


Dr. Chris Antonsen

Dr. Chris Antonsen
- Part-time Instructor (web), Folk Studies

Dr. Darlene Applegate

Dr. Darlene Applegate
- Associate Professor, Anthropology & Department Head

Mr. Brent Bjorkman

Mr. Brent Bjorkman
- Director, Kentucky Folklife Program; Director, Kentucky Museum

Dr. Erika Brady

Dr. Erika Brady
- Professor, Folk Studies

Dr. Camilla Collins

Dr. Camilla Collins
- Retired faculty, Folk Studies

Dr. Larry Danielson

Dr. Larry Danielson
- Retired faculty, Folk Studies

Dr. Tim Evans

Dr. Tim Evans
- Associate Professor, Folk Studies

Dr. Ann K. Ferrell

Dr. Ann K. Ferrell
- Associate Professor, Folk Studies & Program Director

Dr. Tim Frandy

Dr. Tim Frandy
- Assistant Professor, Folk Studies

Dr. Samantha Grace

Dr. Samantha Grace
- Part-time Instructor (web), Anthropology

Mr. Matthew Hale

Mr. Matthew Hale
- Part-time Instructor (web), Folk Studies

Dr. Kate Horigan

Dr. Kate Horigan
- Assistant Professor, Folk Studies

Dr. Jean-Luc Houle

Dr. Jean-Luc Houle
- Associate Professor, Anthropology

Dr. Kate Hudepohl

Dr. Kate Hudepohl
- Associate Professor, Anthropology

Mr. Barry Kaufkins

Mr. Barry Kaufkins
- Instructor II, Folk Studies

Dr. Lynwood Montell

Dr. Lynwood Montell
- Retired faculty, Folk Studies

Dr. Johnston A. K. Njoku

Dr. Johnston A. K. Njoku
- Retired faculty, Folk Studies

Ms. Theresa Osborne

Ms. Theresa Osborne
- Part-time instructor, Folk Studies

Ms. Donna Schulte

Ms. Donna Schulte
- Office Associate

Ms. Virginia Siegel

Ms. Virginia Siegel
- Folklife Specialist, Kentucky Folklife Program

Dr. Ashley Stinnett

Dr. Ashley Stinnett
- Assistant Professor, Anthropology

Dr. Michael Ann Williams

Dr. Michael Ann Williams
- Retired faculty, Folk Studies


 

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