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2020 - 2022 Academic Years


 The following includes the 2020 - 2022 dates of the most commonly celebrated Holy Days, sabbats, and religious or cultural festivals in the United States. Some of the dates remain the same year to year (fixed 365 calendar) while others fluctuate based on the lunisolar, lunar, or solar-derived calendar.

Each celebration is linked, in RED, in the description to a page providing for more information.

Celebrations marked with an "*" are work-restricted Holy Days - please avoid scheduling large-scale, campus events on these dates. In addition, recommended accommodations for work and classes are listed for each as well.

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AUGUST 2020 - 2022

August 1 (every year)

Lammas/Lughnasadh

DescriptionLammas/Lughnasadh is a celebration of the beginning of the harvest. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

Faith/Tradition: Druid, Pagan, Wiccan 

Date Details: Celebrated every August 1st.

General Practices: Making and consuming dishes with the first fruits of the harvest.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

August 6-7, 2021; July 26-27, 2022

Tisha B’Av

Description:  Tisha B’Av commemorates a series of Jewish tragedies including the destruction of the first and second temples in Jerusalem.

Date Details: Begins at sundown on first day, fast deferred because of the Sabbath. Ends August 1st.

General Practices: Fasting and mourning.

Recommended Accommodations: Plan limited activities after a fast.

August 03, 2020; August 22, 2021; August 11, 2022

Raksha Bandhan

Description: Raksha Bandhan falls in the holy month of Shravan; The origin and history of Rakhi can be dated back to the mythological Pouranik times.

Faith/Tradition: Hindu

Date Details: Raksha Bandhan is celebrated in Shravana month during full moon day or Purnima day.

General Practices: A day to acknowledge siblings and their relationships.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

August 12, 2020; August 29, 2021; August 18, 2022

*Krishna Janmashtami

Description: Krishna Janmashtami is a two-day festival celebrating the birth of Krishna, a widely-worshiped Hindu god. Krishna is considered to be a warrior, hero, teacher, and philosopher.

Faith/Tradition: Hindu

Date Details: The first day is called Krishan Ashtami or Gokul Ashtami. The second day is known as Kaal Ashtami or more popularly Janam Ashtami.

General Practices: During this festival, Hindus are likely to forgo sleep in order to sing bhajans, traditional Hindu songs. Many Hindus also fast during the first day of the festival. Dances, songs, and plays depicting the life of Krishna are common.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling major academic deadlines on this day, since it is likely that students will be operating on very little sleep.

August 22, 2020; Sept 9, 2021; August 30, 2022

*Ganesha Chaturthi

Description: Ganesh Chaturthi, in Hinduism, 10-day festival marking the birth of the elephant-headed deity Ganesha, the god of prosperity and wisdom.

Faith/Tradition: Hinduism

Date Details: It begins on the fourth day (chaturthi) of the month of Bhadrapada (August–September), the sixth month of the Hindu calendar.

Recommended Accommodations: None

 

SEPTEMBER 2020 - 2022

September 22 (every year)

Mabon/Alban Elfed/Autumnal Equinox

Description: Also referred to as Harvest Home, the Feast of the Ingathering, and Meán Fómhair. Mabonis the second celebration of the harvest, a ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth, and a recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

Faith/Tradition: Druid, Pagan, Wiccan

Date Details: Falls on the day of the Fall Equinox.

General Practices: At Mabon, day and night are in equal balance. It is a time to offer gratitude for the blessings of the harvest and also to begin to prepare for turning inward. Making dishes with apples, squash and pumpkins as part of ritual celebration is customary.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

Sept 18 – 20, 2020; Sept- 6 – 8, 2021; Sept 25 - 27, 2022

*Rosh Hashanah

Description: Start of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah  is day of judgment and remembrance; the Jewish calendar celebrates the New Year in the seventh month (Tishrei) as a day of rest and celebration ten days before Yom Kippur.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

Date Details: Begins at sundown on the first evening and ends at nightfall on last day.

General Practices: Prayer in synagogue and festive meals.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply).

Sept 27 - 28, 2020; Sept 15 – 16, 2021; Oct 4 – 5, 2022

*Yom Kippur

Description: Yom Kippur is often considered the holiest day of the year for Jews, and the day is dedicated to atonement and abstinence.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

Date Details: Begins at sundown on the first night and ends at nightfall on last night.

General Practices: Fasting from before sundown until after sunset, and lighting of the Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the night of Yom Kippur.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date and after a day of fasting.

 

OCTOBER 2020 -2022

Oct 2 – 9, 2020; Sept 20 – 27, 2021; Oct 9 – Oct 16, 2022

*Sukkot

Description: Sukkot A week-long celebration that begins with the building of Sukkah for sleep and meals; Sukkot is named for the huts Moses and the Israelites lived in as they wandered the desert before reaching the promised land.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

Date Details: Begins in the evening on the first night and ends in the evening of last night.

General Practices: Families in the United States commonly decorate the sukkah with produce and artwork.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on the first two days. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply).

Oct 9 – 11, 2020; Sept 27 - 29, 2021 Oct 16 – Oct 18, 2022

*Shemini Atzeret

Description: Shemini Atzeret, also known as Atzereth, this is a fall festival, which includes a memorial service for the dead and features prayers for rain in Israel.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

Date Details: Begins in the evening of the first day and ends in the evening of the last day.

General Practices: Jews light a Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on Shemini Atzereth (the 8th night of Sukkot).

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply).

Oct 10 – 11, 2020; Sept 28 – 29, 2021; Oct 17 – 18, 2022.

*Simchat Torah

Description: Simchat Torah marks the completion of the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah in the synagogue and the beginning of the new cycle.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

Date Details: Begins in the evening of the first day and ends in the evening of last day.

General Practices: Simchat Torah marks the completion of the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah in the synagogue and the beginning of the new cycle.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. If planning an event, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply).

Oct 17, 2020; Oct 7, 2021, Sept 26, 2022

Navratri

Description: "Nava-ratri" literally means "nine nights." This festival is observed twice a year, once in the beginning of summer and again at the onset of winter.

Faith/Tradition: Hinduism

Date Details: Every year the beginning of summer and the beginning of winter are two very important junctures of climatic change and solar influence. These two junctions have been chosen as the sacred opportunities for the worship of the divine power

General Practices: During Navaratri, we invoke the energy aspect of God in the form of the universal mother, commonly referred to as "Durga," which literally means the remover of miseries of life. She is also referred to as "Devi" (goddess) or "Shakti" (energy or power). It is this energy, which helps God to proceed with the work of creation, preservation, and destruction. In other words, you can say that God is motionless, absolutely changeless, and the Divine Mother Durga does everything.

Recommended Accommodations: A period of fasting.

Oct 29, 2020; Oct 19, 2021, Oct 9, 2022

*Mawlid-an-Nabi-Sharif

Description: Also commonly known as "Milad un Nabi," this day is observed as a public holiday in many countries with a large Muslim population as it commemorates the anniversary of the birth of the founder of Islam and the proclaimer of the Qurʾan.

Faith/Tradition: Muslim

Date Details: 'Mawlid' is Celebrated by Muslims during the month of Rabiulawal, the third month of the Muslim calendar.

General Practices: This is purely a religious festival and is marked as a public holiday.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date (Muslim employees will likely request to have this day off).

October 31 (every year)

Samhain (pronounced sa-win)

Description: Samhain is one of the four "greater Sabbats" and considered by some to be the Wiccan New Year. A time to celebrate the lives of those who have passed on, welcome those born during the past year into the community, and reflecting on past relationships, events and other significant changes in life.

Faith/Tradition: Druid, Pagan, Wiccan

Date Details: Night of October 31st into November 1st every year.

General Practices: Paying respect to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets and other loved ones who have died.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

NOVEMBER 2020 - 2022

Nov 1 (every year)

All Saints' Day

Description: All Saints Day, also known as All Hallows' Day, or Hallowmas, is a Christian celebration in honor of all the saints from Christian history.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

Date Details: In Western Christianity, it is observed on November 1st by the Roman Catholic Church, the Methodist Church, the Lutheran Church, and other Protestant denominations. The Eastern Orthodox Church and associated Eastern Catholic churches observe All Saints Day on the first Sunday following Pentecost

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practices: The date of All Saints Day derives from the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, which was introduced into Germany from Britain. However, both the Germans and the Romans already had celebrations similar to Samhain, which was a day of appeasing the spirits of the dead. Thus, though the date is of Celtic origin, according to many at least, the idea of the ancient pagan holiday was widespread.

Traditionally, liturgical readings in Catholic churches for All Saints Day begin on the evening of October 31.

Recommended Accommodations: Some may wish to attend midday Mass if there is not an option for evening Mass.

November 2 (every year)

All Souls' Day

Description: All Souls’ Dayis also known simply as “the Day of the Dead." It’s a day to remember all the dearly departed: friends, relatives, and ancient ancestors.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

Date details: All Suld's Day (The Day of the Dead) is celebrated every November 2 in many western churches. Eastern churches celebrate it prior to Lent and the day before Pentecost.

General Practices: Catholics traditionally pray for the dead and visit the graves of deceased relatives in cemeteries, particularly in Mexico. Grave sites are adorned with flowers, wreaths, lit candles, and colored-paper streamers.

At home, special altars may be put up that offer food, drink, candy, and more to deceased relatives who may wish to visit that night. The names of the departed and, sometimes, their pictures, are made part of the “altar”.

Also, candy and toys in the shape of skulls, coffins, and all symbols of death and the dead are used to decorate the home, and the family gathers to feast and fellowship till the day has passed.

Recommended Accommodations: None

Oct 19, 2020; Nov 7, 2021; OCt 27, 2022

*Birth of Bahá'u'lláh

Description: Birth of Bahá'u'lláh celebrates the birthday of Bahá'u'lláh, one of the Baha’I faith’s most important figures. For Bahá'ís, the Birth of Bahá'u'lláh is a Holy Day celebrating the rebirth of the world through the love of God. Comparable to what Christmas is for Christians.

Faith/Tradition: Baháʼí

Date Details: Celebrated every November 12th.

General Practices: There are no elaborate traditions surrounding His birth.

Recommended AccommodationsAvoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date (Baha’i employees will likely request to have this day off).

Nov 14, 2020; Nov 4, 2021; Oct 24, 2022

*Diwali/Kali Puja

Diwali—the Hindu “festival of lights”—is an extremely popular holiday for multiple religions throughout Southern Asia. Diwali extends over five days, and celebrates the victory of good over evil. The Times of India described Diwali as “a reaffirmation of hope, a renewed commitment to friendship and goodwill, and a religiously sanctioned celebration of the simple.” Fireworks, oil lamps, and sweets are common, making this a favorite holiday for children. The lamps are lit to help the goddess Lakshmi find her way into people’s homes.

Faith/Tradition Hindu/Jainism

Date Details: People in different regions in India may celebrate Diwali on various dates. This is because traditional lunar calendars can be interpreted in different ways.

General Practices: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Hindu employees will likely request a vacation day on this date.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Hindu employees will likely request a vacation day on this date.

 

DECEMBER 2020 - 2022

Nov 29 - Dec 24, 2020; Nov 28 - Dec 24, 2021; Nov 27 - Dec 24, 2022

Advent

Description: Advent means 'Coming' in Latin. This is the coming of Jesus into the world. Christians use the four Sundays and weeks of Advent to prepare and remember the real meaning of Christmas.

Date Details: Advent is the period of four Sundays and weeks before Christmas.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practice: To balance the two elements of remembrance and anticipation, the first two Sundays in Advent (through December 16th) look forward to Christ’s second coming, and the last two Sundays (December 17th – 24th) look backward to remember Christ’s first coming. Over the course of the four weeks, Scripture readings move from passages about Christ’s return in judgment to Old Testament passages about the expectation of the coming Messiah to New Testament passages about the announcements of Christ’s arrival by John the Baptist and the Angels.

While it is difficult to keep in mind in the midst of holiday celebrations, shopping, lights and decorations, and joyful carols, Advent is intended to be a season of fasting, much like Lent, and there are a variety of ways that this time of mourning works itself out in the season. Reflection on the violence and evil in the world cause us to cry out to God to make things right—to put death’s dark shadows to flight. Our exile in the present makes us look forward to our future Exodus. And our own sinfulness and need for grace lead us to pray for the Holy Spirit to renew his work in conforming us into the image of Christ.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

Dec 10 – 18, 2020; Nov 28 – Dec 6; Dec 18 – Dec 26, 2022

Hanukkah/Chanukah

Description: Hanukkah/Chanukah is the Jewish festival of lights, and lasts for eight days. Hanukkah commemorates the Jewish struggle for religious freedom. The history of the holiday involves a historic military victory in which a Jewish sect called the Maccabees defeated the Syrian Greeks. The celebration commemorates a miracle in which a sacred temple flame burned for eight days on only one day’s worth of oil.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

Date Details: Hanukkah begins at sundown on the first day and ends in the evening of the last day.

General Practices: On each of the eight nights of Hanukkah, Jewish families light an additional candle of the menorah candelabrum until all eight candles are lit. Jews celebrate with food and song, as well as exchanging gifts for eight days.

Recommended Accommodations: Academics and work permitted, not a work holiday. Provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply—potato pancakes, doughnuts or other fried food is customary).

December 8 (every year)

Bodhi Day

Description: Bodhi Day is a holiday which falls on December 8th and celebrates the day in which Siddhartha Gautama sat underneath the Bodhi tree and attained enlightenment. This one defining moment would become the central foundation upon which Buddhism has been built upon for the last 2,500 years. It is a day on which followers can renew their dedication to Buddhism; reaffirm themselves to enlightenment, compassion, and kindness to other living creatures; and also understand the relevance of this religion as it applies to the modern world.

Faith/Tradition: Buddhism

Date Details: December 8, every year

General Practices: Bodhi Day can be celebrated in a number of different ways. Often, Buddhist homes will have ficus religiousa tree that they decorate with beads and multi-colored lights – much in the same way that Christians decorate their Christmas trees. They will also put on reflective ornaments that represent the Three Jewels: Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha. Some people will spend the day meditate on the life of Buddha. Other people will visit stupas (shrines). In some homes, Buddhists will serve special cookies shaped like Bodhi trees or their heart-shaped leaves.

Recommended Accommodations: None

December 8 (every year)

Immaculate Conception

Description: The Feast of the Immaculate Conception is the subject of a lot of misconceptions (so to speak). Perhaps the most common one, held even by many Catholics, is that it celebrates the conception of Christ in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary. That the feast occurs only 17 days before Christmas should make the error obvious! The Feast of the Immaculate Conception, in its oldest form, goes back to the seventh century, when churches in the East began celebrating the Feast of the Conception of Saint Anne, the mother of Mary. In other words, this feast celebrates the conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the womb of Saint Anne; and nine months later, on September 8, we celebrate the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Faith/Tradition: Christian/Roman Catholic

Date Details: Every December 8

General Practices: Many churches, especially the Catholic Church, in the United States hold special services (or masses) to commemorate the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. The feast focuses on the concept that the Virgin Mary was conceived without sin.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

December 21 (every year)

Winter Solstice/Yule

Description: The Pagan celebration of Winter Solstice (also known as Yule) is one of the oldest winter celebrations in the world.

Faith/Tradition: Druid, Pagan, Wiccan

Date Details: The Winter Solstice falls on the shortest day of the year (21st December) and was celebrated in Britain long before the arrival of Christianity.

General Practices: The Druids (Celtic priests) would cut the mistletoe that grew on the oak tree and give it as a blessing. Oaks were seen as sacred and the winter fruit of the mistletoe was a symbol of life in the dark winter months. For people of nearly any religious background, the time of the winter solstice is a time when we gather with family and loved ones. For Pagans and Wiccans, it's often celebrated as Yule, but there are literally dozens of ways you can enjoy the season. There are many different ways to celebrate.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

December 24 (every year)

Christmas Eve

Description:Christmas Eve, also known as the Vigil of Christmas, is perceived as the culmination of the Advent season.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

Date Details:  Christmas Eve, December 24, is the day before Christmas Day and is associated with celebrating Jesus Christ’s birth

General Practices: Christmas Eve has many of its own customs and traditions. The most widely practiced one that still exists today is going to a Midnight Mass Church Service. In many countries, especially Catholic ones such as Spain, Mexico, Poland and Italy, this is the most important Church service of the Christmas season. People might fast during Christmas Eve (not eat any meat or fish usually) and then the main Christmas meal is often eaten after the Midnight Mass Service in these countries. In some other countries, such as Belgium, Finland, Lithuania and Denmark the meal is eaten in the evening and you might go to a Midnight Service afterward!

The Midnight Mass Communion Service (or 'Christ-Mas') was a very special one as it was the only one that was allowed to start after sunset (and before sunrise the next day), so it was held at Midnight!

Recommended Accommodation: While WKU is closed for winter break by this time, it is the norm in the United States to not schedule campus-wide, larger scale events.

December 25 (every year)

Christmas

Description: Christmas, a Christian holiday honoring the birth of Jesus, has evolved into a worldwide religious and secular celebration, incorporating many pre-Christian and pagan traditions into the festivities.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

Date details: With the exception of the Orthodox and Coptic Churches, Christmas in celebrated by Christians on the 25th day od December on the Gregorian Calendar.

General Practices: Christmas traditions include a variety of customs, religious practices, rituals, and folklore associated with the celebration of Christmas. Many of these traditions vary by country or region, while others are universal and practiced in a virtually ubiquitous manner across the world.

Traditions associated with the Christmas holiday are diverse in their origins and nature, with some traditions comprising an exclusively Christian religious character with origins from within the religion, while others have been described as more cultural or secular in nature and have originated from outside the realm of Christian influence. Christmas traditions have also changed and evolved significantly in the centuries since Christmas was first instituted as a holiday, with celebrations often taking on an entirely different quality or atmosphere depending on the time period and geographical region.

Recommended Accommodation: While WKU is closed for winter break by this time, it is the norm in the United States to not schedule campus-wide, larger scale events.

December 26 - January 1 (every year)

Kwanzaa

Description: Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday celebrated by millions throughout the world African community, Kwanzaa brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense. Given the profound significance Kwanzaa has for African Americans and indeed, the world African community, it is imperative that an authoritative source and site be made available to give an accurate and expansive account of its origins, concepts, values, symbols and practice.

Faith/Tradition: African Heritage

Date Details:American Maulana Karenga created Kwanzaa in 1966 during the aftermath of the Watts riots. During the early years of Kwanzaa, Karenga said it was meant to be an alternative to Christmas but i can be celebrated in additions; hence, it starts the day after.

General Practices: During the holiday, families and communities organize activities around the Nguzo Saba (The Seven Principles): Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and lmani (Faith). Participants also celebrate with feasts (karamu), music, dance, poetry, narratives and end the holiday with a day dedicated to reflection and recommitment to The Seven Principles and other central cultural values.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

 JANUARY 2021-2022

January 1 (every year)

Solemnity of Mary

Description: The Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God is a liturgical celebration observed on January 1. The use of the word “solemnity” is a designation used for certain days within the liturgical (church-based) calendar of the Church. Solemnities are the highest rank of liturgical celebration, higher than feast days or memorials. By celebrating a solemnity dedicated to Mary’s motherhood, the Church highlights the significance of her role in the life of Christ.

Faith/Tradition: Christian/Roman Catholic

Date Details: It is celebrated by the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church on 1 January, the Octave (8th) day of Christmastide

General Practices: It is a holy day of obligation for Catholics, meaning that Mass attendance is required (though the Mass obligation is sometimes waived by the bishop for various reasons; when in doubt, check with your parish.)

Recommended Accommodations: This date is also New Years Day, so WKU is not in session.

January 6 (every year)

Epiphany

Description: Epiphany, also known as the Fest of Three Kings, marks the day when Jesus was Baptized and began to teach people about God (when he was about 30). Epiphany means 'revelation' and both the visit of the Wise Men and his Baptism are important times when Jesus was 'revealed' to be very important. Some Churches use Epiphany to celebrate and remember both the visit of the Wise Men and Jesus' Baptism!

Epiphany Eve (also known as Twelfth Night) marks the end of the traditional Christmas celebrations and is the time when you were meant to take Christmas decorations down - although some people leave them up until Candlemas.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

Date Details: Epiphany is celebrated 12 days after Christmas on 6th January (or January 19th for some Orthodox Church who have Christmas on 7th January) and is the time when Christians remember the Wise Men (also sometimes called the Three Kings) who visited Jesus.

General Practices:While no particular celebrations are general, in New Orleans, Louisiana, in the USA, on Epiphany/King's Day, the Christmas Tree is either take down or the ornaments are replaced with Purple, Gold and Green ones and it's then called a 'Mardi Gras Tree'! People also like to eat 'King Cake' (a cinnamon pastry with sugar on the top and sometimes filled with cream cheese or jelly/jam). The King Cake will have a little baby plastic doll inside (which represents Jesus); whoever gets the piece with the baby has to supply the next King Cake! Some people have "King Cake Party" every Friday before Lent (the time before Easter).

Recommended Accommodations: None.

January 7 (every year)

Christmas (Feast of the Nativity)

Description: Orthodox - Feast of the Nativity (Christmas) in the United States  is celebrated on or near January 7 in the Gregorian calendar. This date works to be December 25 in the Julian calendar, which pre-dates the Gregorian calendar. It is a time to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, who is believed to be the son of God.

Faith/Tradition: Orthodox Christian

Date Details: There are Orthodox Churches in the United States that recognize the holiday dates according to the Julian calendar, for example the Russian, Ukrainian, and Serbian Orthodox Churches. The Julian calendar was revised in 1923 and this version is more in line with the Gregorian calendar. Some Orthodox churches follow the revised Julian calendar but many Orthodox churches still follow the more traditional Julian calendar, which has the original dates for Christian observances prior to the Gregorian calendar’s introduction.

General Practices: Many Orthodox Christians attend a special church liturgy on Christmas Day on January 7. Orthodox churches celebrate Christmas Day with various traditions. For example, many churches light a small fire of blessed palms and burn frankincense to commemorate the three wise men’s (also known as Magi) gifts to baby Jesus.  Some parishes have joint celebrations for Christmas Day.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Orthodox employees will likely request a vacation day on this date.

January 14 (every year)

Orthodox New Year

Description: The Old New Year or the Orthodox New Year is an informal traditional holiday, celebrated as the start of the New Year by the Julian calendar. This traditional dating of the New Year is sometimes commonly called "Orthodox" because it harks back to a time when governments in Russia and Eastern Europe used the Julian Calendar, which is still used by some jurisdictions of the Orthodox Church.

Faith/Tradition: Orthodox Christian

Date Details: Orthodox New Year, also known as the Old New Year, according to the Julian calendar is on January 14 in the Gregorian calendar.

General Practices: Many Orthodox Christians who observe the New Year’s Day date from the Julian calendar may spend the day reflecting on the previous year and think about meaningful resolutions for the New Year. 

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Orthodox employees will likely request a vacation day on this date.

Jan 10, 2020; Jan 28, 2021, Jan 18, 2022

Mahayana New Year

Description: In countries where Mahayana Buddhism is the most dominant religion, January is the month of celebration.

Faith/Tradition: Mahayana Buddhism

Date Details: Mahayana Buddhists celebrate the New Year every first full moon of January.

General Practices:Pray/Glorify Buddha and visit a temple. This celebration is all about his life and new beginnings. Buddhist pray for a successful year ahead with his guidance. 

Recommended Accommodations: None.

Jan 28, 2021; Jan 17, 2022

Tu Bishvat

Description: Tu Bishvat  is an ancient and authentic Jewish “Earth Day” that educates Jews about the Jewish tradition’s advocacy of responsible stewardship of God’s creation as manifested in ecological activism. Among them, contemporary versions of the Tu Bishvat seder, emphasizing environmentalist concerns, are gaining popularity.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practices: The holiday of Tu B’shevat fell out of practice after the destruction of the Second Temple, but was revived by kabbalists in the Middle Ages. They instituted the practice of the Tu B’shevat seder, a meal that partly mirrors the Passover seder and involves eating biblical foods native to the Holy Land and drinking four cups of wine.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

 FEBRUARY 2021-22

February 12. 2021; Feb1, 2022

Chinese New Year/Lunar New Year

Description: The Chinese New Year's Day is the new moon day of the first lunar month. According to the Chinese Lunar calendar, the first lunar month is the second new moon after the lunar month contains Winter Solstice. The day of Winter Solstice is around December 23 in the western Gregorian calendar. As a result, Chinese New Year might fall in the second half of January or the first half of February.

Faith/Tradition: Confucianism / Daoism / Buddhism

Date Details: Chinese New Year date is different every year. Generally speaking, it distributes between January 21st and February 22nd.

General Practices: Chinese New Year, also referred to as Lunar New Year, is the most important holiday on the Chinese calendar. The holiday is a two week festival filled with reunions among family and friends, an abundance of delicious food and wishes for a new year filled with prosperity, joy and good fortune.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

March 11, 2021; Feb 22, 2022

Maha Shivaratri

Description: Mahashivratri, “The Great Night of Shiva” is the most significant event in India’s spiritual calendar. Sadhguru explains what makes this night so important, and how we can make use of it.

Date Details: The fourteenth day of every lunar month or the day before the new moon is known as Shivratri. Among all the twelve Shivratris that occur in a calendar year, Mahashivratri, the one that occurs in February-March is of the most spiritual significance.

Faith/Tradition: Hinduism

General Practice: Mahashivratri is the day to honor and celebrate Lord Shiva—honor life and celebrate existence. Most people spend the day of Mahashivratri in prayer, meditation and celebration.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

Feb 27, 2021; March, 2, 2022

Ash Wednesday

Details: Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent, the period of forty days before Easter in which many Christians sacrifice ordinary pleasures to reflect on Christ’s sacrifice.

Date Details: The first day of Lent.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practices: On this day, there are special church services, and the faithful wear a cross of ashes marked on foreheads. Most Christians abstain from meat on this day.

Recommended Accommodations: Provide food accommodation as requested—prohibitions include animal products.

Feb 25-26, 2021; March 16-17, 2022

Purim

Description: Purim commemorates the time when the Jews were living in Persia and were saved by the courage of a young Jewish woman called Esther.

Date Details: Begins in the evening of Saturday, March 11 and ends in the evening of Sunday, March 12.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practices: Many Jews hold carnival-like celebrations on Purim, dressing in costumes, and read the Book of Esther. Triangular, fruit-filled pastries are eaten in opposition to the villain Haman, who wore a three-cornered hat.

Recommended Accommodations: Purim is not subject to the restrictions on work that affect some other holidays; however, some sources indicate that Jews should not go about their ordinary business at Purim out of respect for the festival. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (kosher restrictions apply).

Feb 27, 2021; Feb 16, 2022

Magha Puja Day

Description: Magha Puja Day commemorates an important event in the life of the Buddha, in which the four disciples traveled to join the Buddha.

Date Details: ‎Full moon day of the 3rd lunar month.

Faith/Tradition: Buddhist

General Practices: Buddhist gather at temple at dusk where they make merry, share flowers, incense and lit candles. They celebrate the day by lighting candles and moving in a circle three times around the temple’s main hall in honor of the Three Jewels of Buddhism: the Buddha, Sangha and the Dharma.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

MARCH 2021-2022

March 11, 2021; Feb 22, 2022

Maha Shivaratri

Description: Mahashivratri, “The Great Night of Shiva” is the most significant event in India’s spiritual calendar. Sadhguru explains what makes this night so important, and how we can make use of it.

Date Details: The fourteenth day of every lunar month or the day before the new moon is known as Shivratri. Among all the twelve Shivratris that occur in a calendar year, Mahashivratri, the one that occurs in February-March is of the most spiritual significance.

Faith/Tradition: Hinduism

General Practice: Mahashivratri is the day to honor and celebrate Lord Shiva—honor life and celebrate existence. Most people spend the day of Mahashivratri in prayer, meditation and celebration.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

March 11. 2021; March 1, 2022

Isra and Mi'raj

Description: Many Muslims in the United States observe Isra and Mi'raj  (Al Isra' wal Miraj, Lailat al Mi’raj, or Laylat al Miraj). This event commemorates the Prophet Muhammad’s journey from Mecca to Jerusalem and his ascent into heaven.

Date Details: It is observed on the 27th day of Rajab, the seventh month in the Islamic calendar.

Faith/Tradition: Muslim

General Practice: Customs and traditions that center on Isra and Mi’raj vary in the United States. Many Muslims make special prayers in the evening. Some people attend prayer services and sermons at Islamic centers or mosques while others observe Isra and Mi’raj quietly at home. 

Recommended Accommodations: None.

March 15, 2021, March 7, 2022

Clean Monday (Great Lent Begins)

Description: Also known as Orthodox Shrove Monday or Ash Monday. Great Lent   corresponds to Lent as found in Western Christianity, though the length of the periods are calculated in different ways. They both use a period of 40 days between the beginning and end of Lent, because of the 40 days that Jesus is said to have spent fasting the desert. However, Western Christendom doesn't count Sundays because Jesus is recorded as having resurrected on a Sunday, whereas Eastern Orthodox churches do count Sundays.

Date Details: Clean Monday begins the season of Great Lent in Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Faith/Tradition: Orthodox Christian

General Practices: Clean Monday is a day of strict fasting. Christians are not allowed to eat from midnight to noon and can have no meat at all. Christians are also expected to spend extra time praying during the day and reading from the Bible.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

Feb 25-26, 2021; March 16-17, 2022

Purim

Description: Purim commemorates the time when the Jews were living in Persia and were saved by the courage of a young Jewish woman called Esther.

Date Details: Begins in the evening of Saturday, March 11 and ends in the evening of Sunday, March 12.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practices: Many Jews hold carnival-like celebrations on Purim, dressing in costumes, and read the Book of Esther. Triangular, fruit-filled pastries are eaten in opposition to the villain Haman, who wore a three-cornered hat.

Recommended Accommodations: Purim is not subject to the restrictions on work that affect some other holidays; however, some sources indicate that Jews should not go about their ordinary business at Purim out of respect for the festival. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (kosher restrictions apply).

March 28-29, 2021; March 17-18, 2022

Holi

Description: Holi, also known as the “Festival of Colors,” can be traced to Hindu scriptures commemorating good over evil. This date is also a celebration of the colorful spring and a farewell to the dull winter.

Date Details: ‎Celebrated at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar moon in late February or early March.

Faith Tradition: Hinduism

General Practices: Hindus often sprinkle colored water and powder on others and celebrate with bonfires and lights, signifying victory of good over evil.

Recommended Accommodations: Flexibility when scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Hindu employees/students may request a vacation day on this date.

March 20 (every year)

Ostara/Alban Eilir/Spring Equinox

Description: Ostara/Alban Eilir/Spring Equinox  is regarded as a time of fertility and conception. In some Wiccan traditions, it is marked as the time when the Goddess conceives the God's child, which will be born at the winter solstice. One of eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

Date Details: ‎Every March 20th.

Faith/Tradition: Pagan/Druid/Wiccan

General Practices: Lighting fires to commemorate the return of light in the spring and to honor the God and Goddess. Coloring eggs as a way of honoring fertility is also practiced.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

March 20 (every year)

Naw Ruz

Description: Naw Ruz is the Baha’i New Year, a traditional celebration in Iran adopted as a holy day associated with Baha’i. It is a celebration of spring and new life.

Date Details: ‎Every March 20th - March 21st.

Faith/Tradition: Baha’i 

General Practices: Festive music dancing, prayers, meetings, meals.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

March 27-April 4, 2021; April 15-23, 2022

Pesach/Passover

Description: Pesach  is a week-long observance commemorating the freedom and exodus of the Israelites (Jewish slaves) from Egypt during the reign of the Pharaoh Ramses II (one of three pilgrimage festivals).

Date Details: Begins at sundown on the first day and ends on sundown on the last day.

General Practices: Family gatherings, ritualized meals called Seders, reading of the Haggadah, lighting of Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the last night of Passover.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities on the first two and last two days of the holiday, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply—the use of leavening is prohibited so, for example, matzah is eaten in place of bread).

March 28, 2021; April 10, 2022

Palm Sunday

Description: Palm Sunday is a commemoration of Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as crowds lined his path with palm fronds.

Date Details: Sunday before Easter.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practices: Prayer, distribution of palm leaves commemorating Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem prior to his crucifixion.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

APRIL 2019

March 28, 2021; April 10, 2022

Palm Sunday

Description:  Palm Sunday is a commemoration of Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as crowds lined his path with palm fronds.

Date Details: Sunday before Easter.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practices: Prayer, distribution of palm leaves commemorating Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem prior to his crucifixion.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

April 1, 2021; April 14, 2022

Holy/Maundy Thursday

Description: Holy/Maundy Thursday is the Thursday before Easter, commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles.

Date Details: Always falls on the Thursday before Easter Sunday.

Faith/Traditions: Christian

General Practices: Prayer, Communion (Eucharist), meals, and foot-washing ceremonies among some Christian denominations.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

April 2, 2021; April 15, 2022

Good Friday

Description: Good Friday is the Friday before Easter, commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ; among some sects of Christianity and in many countries marks a day of fasting.

Date Details: Always falls on the Friday before Easter Sunday.

Faith/Traditions: Christian

General Practices: Prayer, fasting, and noon or afternoon services in some Christian denominations.

Recommended Accommodations: Provide food accommodation as requested—meat (fish is not considered meat) is prohibited during meals for some. Some may want to attended services at noon or 3pm.

March 27-April 4, 2021; April 15-23, 2022

*Pesach/Passover

Description: Pesach  is a week-long observance commemorating the freedom and exodus of the Israelites (Jewish slaves) from Egypt during the reign of the Pharaoh Ramses II (one of three pilgrimage festivals).

Date Details: Begins at sundown on the first day and ends on sundown on the last day.

General Practices: Family gatherings, ritualized meals called Seders, reading of the Haggadah, lighting of Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the last night of Passover.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities on the first two and last two days of the holiday, provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply—the use of leavening is prohibited so, for example, matzah is eaten in place of bread).

April 3, 2021; April 16, 2022

Holy Saturday

Description: In the primitive Church  Holy Saturday  was known as Great, or Grand, Saturday, Holy Saturday, the Angelic Night, the Vigil of Easter, etc. It is no longer, like Maundy Thursday, a day of joy, but one of joy and sadness intermingled; it is the close of the season of Lent and penance, and the beginning of paschal time, which is one of rejoicing.

Date Details: The eve/vigil/evening before Easter Sunday.

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practice: This vigil opened with the blessing of the new fire, the lighting of lamps and candles and of the paschal candle, ceremonies that have lost much of their symbolism by being anticipated and advanced from twilight to broad daylight. The assembled faithful give themselves up to common prayer, the singing of psalms and hymns, and the reading of the Scriptures commentated by the bishop or priests. The vigil of Easter iss especially devoted to the baptism of catechumens who, in the more important churches, were very numerous.

Recommended Accommodations: Since this is commonly considered a holiday weekend n the U.S., large-scale events are not normally held.

April 4, 2021; April 17, 2022

Easter Sunday

Description: Easter is the annual commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Date Details: Easter Sunday is determined by the Gregorian calendar (Gregorian calendar regulates ceremonial cycle of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches).

Faith/Tradition: Christian

General Practices: Celebratory meals, family gatherings, distribution of colored eggs, baskets and chocolate bunnies. It is a celebration of renewal.

Recommended Accommodations: Because this holiday falls on Sunday, academic accommodations may not be required.

April 8-9, 2021; April 28-29, 2022

Yom HaSho’ah

Description: Holocaust Remembrance Day; a day to remember the lives and names of Jewish victims and activists of the Holocaust.

Date Details: Begins at sundown on the evening before and the next evening.

General Practices: Ceremonies or events to remember Holocaust victims who died during World War II; activities may include lighting memorial candles and reciting the Kaddish, which is a prayer for the departed.

Recommended Accommodations: This is not a work holiday—academics and work are permitted. Provide food accommodation as requested (kosher restrictions apply).

April 13-May 12, 2021; April 3-May 2, 2022

Ramadan

Description: Ramadan  is an occasion to focus on faith through fasting and prayer, and is one of the most important Muslim holidays. Ramadan is notable because the Qur’an was first revealed during this month, and Muslims see the Qur’an as the ultimate form of guidance for mankind. The night that the Qur’an was revealed to Muhammad is called Lailat ul Oadr, and standing in prayer this one night is thought to eclipse months of worship.

Date Details: Dates are determined by the lunar calendar. Lunar calendars can vary based on region and practice. The observed date marks the beginning of a 30 day observation. Ends June 25th.

Faith/Tradition: Muslim/Islam

General Practices: Fasting is required during the entire month of Ramadan. Muslims refrain from food and beverages during the daylight hours, and smoking and sexual relations are forbidden. Worshipers break the fasting each night with prayer, reading of the Qur'an, and a meal called the iftar. In addition, many Muslims also attend night prayers at Mosques. Muslims also believe that their good actions bring a greater reward during this month than any other time of the year, so almost all Muslims try to give up bad habits during Ramadan.

Recommended Accommodations: If possible, avoid scheduling major academic deadlines during this time. Be sensitive to the fact that students and employees celebrating Ramadan will be fasting during the day (continuously for 30 days) and will likely have less stamina as a result. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (halal restrictions apply).

April 16-17, 2021; May 5-6, 2022

Yom Ha’atzmaut

Description: Yom Ha’atzmaut is Israel’s Independence Day.

Date Details: It is celebrated on the fifth day of the month of Iyar, which is the Hebrew date of the formal establishment of the State of Israel, when members of the “provisional government” read and signed a Declaration of Independence in Tel Aviv. The original date corresponded to May 14, 1948.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practice: Other than the official ceremonies, Israelis celebrate Yom Ha’atzmaut in a variety of ways. In the cities, the nighttime festivities may be found on the main streets. Crowds will gather to watch public shows offered for free by the municipalities and the government. Many spend the night dancing Israeli folk dances or singing Israeli songs. During the daytime thousands of Israeli families go out on hikes and picnics.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

April 21, 2021; April 10, 2022

Rama Navami

Description: Rama is believed to have been an incarnation of the god Vishnu and a wise and good king whose reign (the “Rama Rajya”) brought about great prosperity. The holiday is also celebrated in Nepal and by Hindus around the world.

Date Details: Ram Navami occurs on the 9th day of the month of Chaitra on the Hindu calendar.

Faith Tradition: Hinduism

General Practice: To celebrate the occasion, devotees will chant appropriate mantras all day long. They will also offer Rama flowers and fruits and go to temples or family shrines at noontime to pray to him. Additionally, there will be processions of his statues, rocking of smaller versions of his statue in a cradle, drinking of a sweet, peppered jaggery beverage, fasting until evening, and feasting during the evening.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

April 27, 2021; April 16, 2022

Hanuman Jayanti

Description: Hanuman Jayanti celebrates the birth of Lord Hanuman. Hanuman was the son of Anjana, a female spirit of the clouds and waters, and Desari, the chief of the vanara, a group of powerful monkey people who lived in the forests. The wind god Vayu also played a role in the conception and birth of Hanuman.

Date Details: Every spring, Hindus across the world visit temples and apply sindoor, a red pigment, to their foreheads. This ritual is part of the annual Hindu festival of Hanuman Jayanti, also called Hanuman Janam-Utsav. The date of Hanuman Jayanti varies from year to year and across India.

Faith/Tradition: Hinduism

General Practice: Hanuman Jayanti celebrates the birth of Lord Hanuman. Hanuman was the son of Anjana, a female spirit of the clouds and waters, and Desari, the chief of the vanara, a group of powerful monkey people who lived in the forests. The wind god Vayu also played a role in the conception and birth of Hanuman. Some texts identify Hanuman as an incarnation of Shiva, but Hanuman is best known for his role in the epic poem and sacred text the Ramayana, “Rama’s Journey.”

Recommended Accommodations: None.

April 30; April 22, 2022

Orthodox Good Friday

Description: Good Friday is the Friday before Easter, commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ; among some sects of Christianity and in many countries marks a day of fasting.

Date Details: Good Friday is determined by the Julian calendar which regulates ceremonial cycle of the Eastern Orthodox Christian churches.

Faith/Traditions: Christian Orthodox

General Practices: Prayer, fasting, and noon or afternoon services in some Christian denominations.

Recommended Accommodations: Provide food accommodation as requested—meat (fish is not considered meat) is prohibited during meals for some.

May 2, 2021; April 24, 2022

Orthodox Easter

Description:  Easter is the annual commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Date Details: Easter Sunday is determined by the Julian calendar which regulates ceremonial cycle of the Eastern Orthodox Christian churches.

Faith/Tradition: Christian Orthodox

General Practices: Celebratory meals, family gatherings, distribution of colored eggs and baskets of breads, meats, eggs, cheeses and other foods. It is a celebration of renewal.

Recommended Accommodations: Because this holiday falls on Sunday, academic accommodations may not be required

 

MAY 2021-2022

May 1 (every year)

Beltane

Description: Beltane  is the fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

Date Details: Every May 1st.

Faith/Tradition: Druid/Pagan/Wiccan

General Practices: Jumping the balefire, dancing the Maypole.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

May 2, 2021; April 24, 2022

Orthodox Easter

Description:Easter is the annual commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Date Details: Easter Sunday is determined by the Julian calendar which regulates ceremonial cycle of the Eastern Orthodox Christian churches.

Faith/Tradition: Christian Orthodox

General Practices: Celebratory meals, family gatherings, distribution of colored eggs and baskets of breads, meats, eggs, cheeses and other foods. It is a celebration of renewal.

Recommended Accommodations: Because this holiday falls on Sunday, academic accommodations may not be required

April 16-17, 2021; May 5-6, 2022

Yom Ha'Atzmaut

Description: Yom Ha’atzmaut is Israel’s Independence Day.

Date Details: It is celebrated on the fifth day of the month of Iyar, which is the Hebrew date of the formal establishment of the State of Israel, when members of the “provisional government” read and signed a Declaration of Independence in Tel Aviv. The original date corresponded to May 14, 1948.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practice: Other than the official ceremonies, Israelis celebrate Yom Ha’atzmaut in a variety of ways. In the cities, the nighttime festivities may be found on the main streets. Crowds will gather to watch public shows offered for free by the municipalities and the government. Many spend the night dancing Israeli folk dances or singing Israeli songs. During the daytime thousands of Israeli families go out on hikes and picnics.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

May 16-18, 2021; June 4-6, 2022

Shavuot

Description: Shavuot  commemorates receipt of the Torah on Mount Sinai (two of three pilgrimage festivals).

Date Details: Begins at sundown on May 30th and ends June 1st.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practices: Evening of devotional programs and studying the Torah, lighting of Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on the second night of Shavuot.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events and activities. Provide food accommodation as requested. (Kosher restrictions apply—although it is customary to eat dairy).

May 12-13, 2021; May 2-3, 2022

*Eid al-Fitr

Description: Eid al-Fitr means "break the fast", and is the last day of Ramadan, marking the end of a month of fasting.

Date Details: Dates are determined by the lunar calendar. Lunar calendars can vary based on region and practice. Eid al Fitr is a three day celebration and begins at sundown.

Faith/Tradition: Muslim/Islam

General Practices: Muslims often pray, exchange gifts, give money to children, feast, and celebrate with friends and family.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, or activities on this date. Employees will likely ask to take a vacation day on this day, and that request should be granted if at all possible. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (Islamic dietary restrictions apply).

May 29 (every year)

Ascension of the Bahá'u'lláh

Description: Bahá'u'lláh  commemorates the death of the founder of the Baha’i faith; Bahaullah died on May 29, 1892.

Date Details: Every May 29th.

Faith/Tradition: Baha’i 

General Practices: Devotional programs and reading from the scriptures.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

 JUNE 2021-2022

June 21 (every year)

Litha/Midsomer/Alban Hefin/Summer Solstice

Description: Litha/Midsomer/Alban Hefin/Summer Solstice is a celebration of the longest day of the year and the beginning of summer. Celebration of the Goddess manifesting as Mother Earth and the God as the Sun King. For some Pagans the Summer Solstice marks the marriage of the God and Goddess and see their union as the force that creates the harvest's fruits. One of the eight major annual sabbats or festivals.

Date Details: Every June 21st.

General Practices: Lighting to bonfires and watching the sun rise.

Recommended Accommodations: None.

 

 JULY 2021-2022

July 19-20, 2021; July 9-10, 2022

*Eid al-Adha

Description: Eid al-Adha is a major festival that celebrates the willingness to make sacrifices in the name of one’s faith. According to Islamic tradition, the prophet Ibrahim was ordered to sacrifice his son in God’s name. When Ibrahim was prepared to kill his son, God stepped in and gave him a sheep to sacrifice instead. This holiday celebrates Ibrahim’s total faith in God, and Muslims view this holiday as an important annual reminder.

Date Details: Lunar calendars can vary based on region and practice. Begins at sundown on the first day and ends in the evening of last day.

Faith/Tradition: Muslim/Islam

General Practices: Prayers, gift giving, prayers, and sometimes killing of sheep, with a portion of the meat gifted to the poor.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on the first day. If planning an evening event, provide food accommodations if requested (halal restrictions apply).

August 6-7, 2021; July 26-27, 2022

Tisha B’Av

Description: Tisha B’Av  commemorates a series of Jewish tragedies including the destruction of the first and second temples in Jerusalem.

Date Details: Begins at sundown on first day, fast deferred because of the Sabbath. Ends sundown on the last day.

Faith/Tradition: Judaism

General Practices: Fasting and mourning.

Recommended Accommodations: Plan limited activities after a fast.

 

 


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 Last Modified 12/18/20