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inforgaphic about WKU

 

Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public institution that offers an authentic American experience in the beautiful and lively city of Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Our hilltop campus is a place of diversity and friendliness. It embraces a proud heritage and a bold, ambitious future. WKU is home to many highly ranked and nationally recognized academic programs such as Business/Management, Journalism and Broadcasting, Engineering, Computer Science, Social Sciences, and Math, including an award-winning speech and debate team.  

In addition to our top academic programs, WKU is also home to competitive Division I Athletic teams including tennis, basketball, soccer, and football.  More than 20,000 students grace WKU's campus, including students from over 60 countries. WKU is one of four nationally recognized Safe Communities America by the National Safety Council and is ranked as one of the most beautiful southern campuses by U.S. News.  Centrally located and easily accessible to many major U.S. cities, WKU is known for the southern hospitality and charm that Kentucky has to offer.  Bowling Green, Kentucky (home to WKU) is ranked one of the top 10 U.S. college towns. 

Watch an incredible video that shows what it is like to be an international student on our campus, download our international student brochures and schedule time to video chat or WhatsApp with a current international student below.


 

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WKU International View Book
Western Kentucky University Overview

WKU Admissions and cost for international students studying in the usa

 

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International Scholarships

Scholarship opportunities for international students studying in the USA

 


 

 

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LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

 

 

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Questions? We're here to help!

Want to know what it's really like to be a student at WKU? Schedule a one-on-one 
Skype or WhatsApp chat with one of our student diplomats! 

2019-20 Diplomats

 

CHAT WITH A DIPLOMAT

  

 

 

 

CONTACT US: 

EMAIL: iem@wku.edu

Phone: +1270-745-4857

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CHAT WITH AN ADMISSIONS COUNSELOR 


Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [title] => Minding the Gap: A Discovery of the Love for Studying Abroad
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/07/minding-the-gap-a-discovery-of-the-love-for-studying-abroad/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/07/minding-the-gap-a-discovery-of-the-love-for-studying-abroad/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-07
            [date] => 2020-04-07
            [description] => Student Profile: Frank Zheng What study abroad experience do you want to relive? “I would say traveling across Italy without any coursework to worry about. It allowed me to not worry about anything other than enjoying my time there and getting to fully experience the culture and food.” -Frank Zheng According to Go Overseas, studying abroad gives students the opportunity to become more independent, learn to adapt to new situations, and enhance their future career.            WKU junior Frank Zheng, who has studied abroad three times, is planning on interning abroad in the summer, and discovered a desire to work abroad, experienced all of these opportunities and more.             Zheng is a junior who is triple majoring in Accounting, Business Data Analytics, and International Business. He is a Student Representative for the Office of Study Abroad & Global Learning (SAGL) and has studied abroad at the Hanyang International Summer School (HISS) during summer 2018, at Harlaxton College during spring 2019, and in London and Dublin with the Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA) during winter 2020.             Zheng knew he wanted to study abroad and was interested in Harlaxton College, which he learned about through Bryson Keltner, a former SAGL Student Representative and Harlaxton College Media intern and the current International Recruitment and Admissions Counselor for WKU. He studied abroad at HISS first to decide if he wanted to go abroad for a full semester, and he soon “discover[ed his] passion for international travel.”             “It affirmed my intentions and so much more!” Zheng said. “Once I returned back to the U.S. from my first program in South Korea, I instantly knew that I wanted to study abroad again and decided to commit to Harlaxton College for Spring 2019.”             Prior to studying abroad, Zheng was most worried about culture shock and the transition to a different country. South Korea, which is a collectivistic culture as opposed to the United States’ individualistic culture, was his biggest adjustment. His other two programs in England and Ireland were smoother because their cultures are more similar to the United States and Zheng had experience making the transition.             Another comfort for Zheng was the presence of WKU students on his programs, and one of his favorite memories is when he met his friend and fellow WKU student Caleb Tamminga in Italy after their separate programs ended. Tamminga arrived in Italy before Zheng, and after Zheng contacted him when he landed,  they struggled to find each other before realizing they were in different airports. After finding their own ways to the hostel they were staying, the two friends spent hours into the night catching up about their past months abroad.             While having the comfort of home while abroad is a definite bonus, Zheng recommends that students meet other people because it is “refreshing to step outside of your comfort zone and meet new people who might have different interests than you.”             Meeting new people is not the only way to gain confidence or explore different paths while studying abroad. For Zheng, choosing to study abroad at Harlaxton College, whose picturesque manor near the heart of England attracts many arts and humanities students, was a chance to explore a field outside his major.             “It was a great opportunity to try something new,” Zheng said. “As a business major, the humanities was definitely outside of my comfort zone.”             After studying abroad three times and traveling to 16 countries, Zheng realized he had a “passion for international travel,” which led to his pursuing a summer internship abroad and wanting to work abroad after college.             This summer (2020), Zheng will intern abroad with KPMG, which is a Big Four accounting firm. After working as a global audit intern for four weeks in the Boston office, he will travel to Auckland, New Zealand, for an additional four weeks. Zheng hopes that the summer internship will lead to a full-time offer from KPMG so that he can begin his career in their auditing practice.             Zheng’s decision to study abroad in the summer of 2018 evolved into two subsequent study abroad programs, a plan to intern abroad, and a newfound appreciation for travel. He believes that studying abroad can have a similar impact on other students.              “If you are able to study abroad, DO IT!” Zheng said. “I know it’s cliché to say that it is a life changing experience, but it definitely allows you to discover who you truly are and pursue your passions.”             Although studying abroad can be challenging, Zheng emphasized the helpfulness of WKU to provide resources, and he said that most students receive some financial aid.             Despite any transitions or uncertainties while abroad, Zheng realized that cultural differences are not bad just because they are unfamiliar. In a reflection written during his semester at Harlaxton College, Zheng said:  “While many of us explored London this past weekend, we were constantly reminded to ‘mind the gap’ between the train and the platform. The ‘gap,’ in my opinion, represents the personal and intellectual journey we decided to embark upon when we left behind the comfort and familiarity of the states. Whether this is our first time studying abroad or living independently, we each possess some sort of ‘gap’ between our unique cultures and the British one. Using the train as a vessel of exploration, we sought new experiences at each stop. Although some things may seem ‘different different,’ we quickly realized that these differences exist for a specific reason – some we may never fully understand in our lifetime. The ‘gap’ does exist, so let’s make it a point to close it on our adventures to become responsible global citizens.” For more information about studying abroad, visit the Office of Study Abroad & Global Learning’s website at https://www.wku.edu/studyabroad/, email us at study.abroad@wku.edu, or follow us on Instagram/Twitter @wkustudyabroad. 
            [summary] => Student Profile: Frank Zheng What study abroad experience do you want to relive? “I would say traveling across Italy without any coursework to worry about. It allowed me to not worry about anything other than enjoying my time there and getting to fully experience the culture and food.” -Frank Zheng According to Go Overseas, studying abroad gives students the opportunity to become more independent, learn to adapt to new situations, and enhance their future career.            WKU junior Frank Zheng, who has studied abroad three times, is planning on interning abroad in the summer, and discovered a desire to work abroad, experienced all of these opportunities and more.             Zheng is a junior who is triple majoring in Accounting, Business Data Analytics, and International Business. He is a Student Representative for the Office of Study Abroad & Global Learning (SAGL) and has studied abroad at the Hanyang International Summer School (HISS) during summer 2018, at Harlaxton College during spring 2019, and in London and Dublin with the Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA) during winter 2020.             Zheng knew he wanted to study abroad and was interested in Harlaxton College, which he learned about through Bryson Keltner, a former SAGL Student Representative and Harlaxton College Media intern and the current International Recruitment and Admissions Counselor for WKU. He studied abroad at HISS first to decide if he wanted to go abroad for a full semester, and he soon “discover[ed his] passion for international travel.”             “It affirmed my intentions and so much more!” Zheng said. “Once I returned back to the U.S. from my first program in South Korea, I instantly knew that I wanted to study abroad again and decided to commit to Harlaxton College for Spring 2019.”             Prior to studying abroad, Zheng was most worried about culture shock and the transition to a different country. South Korea, which is a collectivistic culture as opposed to the United States’ individualistic culture, was his biggest adjustment. His other two programs in England and Ireland were smoother because their cultures are more similar to the United States and Zheng had experience making the transition.             Another comfort for Zheng was the presence of WKU students on his programs, and one of his favorite memories is when he met his friend and fellow WKU student Caleb Tamminga in Italy after their separate programs ended. Tamminga arrived in Italy before Zheng, and after Zheng contacted him when he landed,  they struggled to find each other before realizing they were in different airports. After finding their own ways to the hostel they were staying, the two friends spent hours into the night catching up about their past months abroad.             While having the comfort of home while abroad is a definite bonus, Zheng recommends that students meet other people because it is “refreshing to step outside of your comfort zone and meet new people who might have different interests than you.”             Meeting new people is not the only way to gain confidence or explore different paths while studying abroad. For Zheng, choosing to study abroad at Harlaxton College, whose picturesque manor near the heart of England attracts many arts and humanities students, was a chance to explore a field outside his major.             “It was a great opportunity to try something new,” Zheng said. “As a business major, the humanities was definitely outside of my comfort zone.”             After studying abroad three times and traveling to 16 countries, Zheng realized he had a “passion for international travel,” which led to his pursuing a summer internship abroad and wanting to work abroad after college.             This summer (2020), Zheng will intern abroad with KPMG, which is a Big Four accounting firm. After working as a global audit intern for four weeks in the Boston office, he will travel to Auckland, New Zealand, for an additional four weeks. Zheng hopes that the summer internship will lead to a full-time offer from KPMG so that he can begin his career in their auditing practice.             Zheng’s decision to study abroad in the summer of 2018 evolved into two subsequent study abroad programs, a plan to intern abroad, and a newfound appreciation for travel. He believes that studying abroad can have a similar impact on other students.              “If you are able to study abroad, DO IT!” Zheng said. “I know it’s cliché to say that it is a life changing experience, but it definitely allows you to discover who you truly are and pursue your passions.”             Although studying abroad can be challenging, Zheng emphasized the helpfulness of WKU to provide resources, and he said that most students receive some financial aid.             Despite any transitions or uncertainties while abroad, Zheng realized that cultural differences are not bad just because they are unfamiliar. In a reflection written during his semester at Harlaxton College, Zheng said:  “While many of us explored London this past weekend, we were constantly reminded to ‘mind the gap’ between the train and the platform. The ‘gap,’ in my opinion, represents the personal and intellectual journey we decided to embark upon when we left behind the comfort and familiarity of the states. Whether this is our first time studying abroad or living independently, we each possess some sort of ‘gap’ between our unique cultures and the British one. Using the train as a vessel of exploration, we sought new experiences at each stop. Although some things may seem ‘different different,’ we quickly realized that these differences exist for a specific reason – some we may never fully understand in our lifetime. The ‘gap’ does exist, so let’s make it a point to close it on our adventures to become responsible global citizens.” For more information about studying abroad, visit the Office of Study Abroad & Global Learning’s website at https://www.wku.edu/studyabroad/, email us at study.abroad@wku.edu, or follow us on Instagram/Twitter @wkustudyabroad. 
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/04/Photo-1-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/04/Photo-1-350x250.jpg
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [title] => Feeling ‘stuck:’ Overcoming isolation by virtually traveling to experience new cultures
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/04/feeling-stuck-overcoming-isolation-by-virtually-traveling-to-experience-new-cultures/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/04/feeling-stuck-overcoming-isolation-by-virtually-traveling-to-experience-new-cultures/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-04
            [date] => 2020-04-04
            [description] => The availability of portable devices that allow virtual access to information has laid at the tips of our fingertips for decades now, and the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic has served as a reminder of it. Every day, millions of people keep up with world news through apps on their phone and most everyone is no stranger to the escalating coronavirus crisis that is plaguing countries around the world. This pandemic has ushered in a unique situation – how we deal with a global crisis in the era of an incredibly technologically advanced society. As people around the world make sacrifices in their daily lives, whether it be refraining from social gatherings, working from home, doing online classes or postponing important life events, they are all contributing to the necessary effort to navigate a new “normal” without any indication of how long this will last.           Although the uncertainty casts a shadow on everyone’s lives, a positive aspect of being stuck at home is the accessibility of resources through a virtual lens. Nearly everyone seems to be facing the internal dilemma of what to do with all this free time, and the only logical answer to that is catching up on everything that has sat patiently in the back of everyone’s mind in the “one day” folder. “One day I’ll learn more about this,” or “one day I’ll get to see this,” are thoughts that inevitably cross everyone’s mind at some point, but this spare time is the perfect opportunity to use the internet to pursue interests that would otherwise be pushed to the backburner. In a deed of public service, many institutions have made their resources freely accessible to the public, including museums.          Nearly everyone can think of a specific artist or work of art that piques their interest that they never thought they would be able to see in person and with the current travel restrictions, it seems even less possible. However, back in January, a collection of 14 museums called Paris Musées, created digital copies of hundreds of thousands of artworks available to view for free on their website. Through this, viewers are able to travel not only to Paris, but through centuries of different periods of art in the comfort of their own home. Other prominent museums around the world also have virtual tours available that include a more immersive experience as it takes you through the halls of some of the most revered artwork ever created.          Using the Google Arts and Culture app, museums and galleries such as the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul, South Korea, the Museu de Arte de São Paulo in Brazil and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy offer virtual walkthroughs, allowing you to see works as up close as possible. The Arts and Culture app even includes features such as “pocket galleries” and “art projections.” The former allows you to use your phone to virtually create a gallery around you that allows you to approach and explore different art works as if they were in the same room as you, while art projections allow you to project a work of art on a wall to see how its size would look in real life.          Although viewing art online isn’t the same experience as actually witnessing a master work in person, it still allows you to appreciate the talent of artists both past and present. If anything, it elevates the level of excitement of possibly getting to see these works in person once widespread travel is allowed again. Being able to see the beauty of Sandro Botticelli’s “Birth of Venus” or the raw emotion in Artemisia Gentileschi’s “Judith Slaying Holofernes” in the Uffizi Gallery are just two examples of incredible pieces of art that can’t be done justice through photos.          Cultural enrichment through art is not only a fascinating way to explore the world, but it also ties into other areas of interest such as research, communication and history. Art is the perfect way to occupy one’s time while being confined at home because learning about the subject matter of different works is valuable to understanding different parts of the world and how people interact with each other across cultures. Utilizing the works the Paris museums have put online and the exploring the Google Arts and Culture app not only provide dynamic ways to interact with familiar works, but also leads to the discovery of artists that aren’t as well-known but still contribute greatly to a certain movement. These resources that have been put online for anyone to access are extremely valuable in times like this, where to overcome the feeling of being “stuck,” virtually traveling and interacting with new environments proves easier than ever before.
            [summary] => The availability of portable devices that allow virtual access to information has laid at the tips of our fingertips for decades now, and the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic has served as a reminder of it. Every day, millions of people keep up with world news through apps on their phone and most everyone is no stranger to the escalating coronavirus crisis that is plaguing countries around the world. This pandemic has ushered in a unique situation – how we deal with a global crisis in the era of an incredibly technologically advanced society. As people around the world make sacrifices in their daily lives, whether it be refraining from social gatherings, working from home, doing online classes or postponing important life events, they are all contributing to the necessary effort to navigate a new “normal” without any indication of how long this will last.           Although the uncertainty casts a shadow on everyone’s lives, a positive aspect of being stuck at home is the accessibility of resources through a virtual lens. Nearly everyone seems to be facing the internal dilemma of what to do with all this free time, and the only logical answer to that is catching up on everything that has sat patiently in the back of everyone’s mind in the “one day” folder. “One day I’ll learn more about this,” or “one day I’ll get to see this,” are thoughts that inevitably cross everyone’s mind at some point, but this spare time is the perfect opportunity to use the internet to pursue interests that would otherwise be pushed to the backburner. In a deed of public service, many institutions have made their resources freely accessible to the public, including museums.          Nearly everyone can think of a specific artist or work of art that piques their interest that they never thought they would be able to see in person and with the current travel restrictions, it seems even less possible. However, back in January, a collection of 14 museums called Paris Musées, created digital copies of hundreds of thousands of artworks available to view for free on their website. Through this, viewers are able to travel not only to Paris, but through centuries of different periods of art in the comfort of their own home. Other prominent museums around the world also have virtual tours available that include a more immersive experience as it takes you through the halls of some of the most revered artwork ever created.          Using the Google Arts and Culture app, museums and galleries such as the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul, South Korea, the Museu de Arte de São Paulo in Brazil and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy offer virtual walkthroughs, allowing you to see works as up close as possible. The Arts and Culture app even includes features such as “pocket galleries” and “art projections.” The former allows you to use your phone to virtually create a gallery around you that allows you to approach and explore different art works as if they were in the same room as you, while art projections allow you to project a work of art on a wall to see how its size would look in real life.          Although viewing art online isn’t the same experience as actually witnessing a master work in person, it still allows you to appreciate the talent of artists both past and present. If anything, it elevates the level of excitement of possibly getting to see these works in person once widespread travel is allowed again. Being able to see the beauty of Sandro Botticelli’s “Birth of Venus” or the raw emotion in Artemisia Gentileschi’s “Judith Slaying Holofernes” in the Uffizi Gallery are just two examples of incredible pieces of art that can’t be done justice through photos.          Cultural enrichment through art is not only a fascinating way to explore the world, but it also ties into other areas of interest such as research, communication and history. Art is the perfect way to occupy one’s time while being confined at home because learning about the subject matter of different works is valuable to understanding different parts of the world and how people interact with each other across cultures. Utilizing the works the Paris museums have put online and the exploring the Google Arts and Culture app not only provide dynamic ways to interact with familiar works, but also leads to the discovery of artists that aren’t as well-known but still contribute greatly to a certain movement. These resources that have been put online for anyone to access are extremely valuable in times like this, where to overcome the feeling of being “stuck,” virtually traveling and interacting with new environments proves easier than ever before.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/04/florence-uffizi-gallery-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/04/florence-uffizi-gallery-350x250.jpg
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [title] => WKU Grad Hanif Hafizullah on his OPT Experience
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/01/wku-grad-hanif-hafizullah-on-his-opt-experience/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/04/01/wku-grad-hanif-hafizullah-on-his-opt-experience/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-04-01
            [date] => 2020-04-01
            [description] => OPT, or Optical Practical Training, is a program where students who come to study in the U.S. apply to work in their desired career field after they graduate for a limited time. WKU grad Hanif Hafizullah talked to us about the experience he gained as part of his OPT while working for HomeInstead as a senior caretaker. “It was a nice experience, I hope whoever does it enjoys it and makes the most out of it,” said Hafizullah, speaking about OPT. Hafizullah, who’s degree was in health science, helped take care of the elderly. From helping them eat, to helping them to remember medication or taking care of their pets, Hafizullah was there. “Taking care of yourself is one thing, but taking care of somebody else, you know it’s not easy,” said Hafizullah. Hafizullah was up for the challenge and in the process, gained many valuable skills for his field while connecting with locals. “It was something special because I got to know a lot about Kentucky. Just living here it’s different, but then the part of my job was to go to their houses to live with them for six to seven hours” said Hafizullah. One of his client’s families even invited him for a traditional southern meal, with mashed potatoes and gravy. “I got to know them and their families, as well as culture and tradition.” After his experience, Hafizullah came to the decision that he’d like to put his care taking skills to a different test and is now pursuing a degree in sports medicine so that he can help athletes with injuries. Hafizullah encourages everyone getting ready to graduate to apply for their OPT several months in advance as the application usually takes about six months to process. Hafizullah says he still hopes to move to a bigger city one day, but for now, Bowling Green is his home. “In this area, the university and campus included, people are nice and everybody’s helpful, so plans changed. I never moved.”
            [summary] => OPT, or Optical Practical Training, is a program where students who come to study in the U.S. apply to work in their desired career field after they graduate for a limited time. WKU grad Hanif Hafizullah talked to us about the experience he gained as part of his OPT while working for HomeInstead as a senior caretaker. “It was a nice experience, I hope whoever does it enjoys it and makes the most out of it,” said Hafizullah, speaking about OPT. Hafizullah, who’s degree was in health science, helped take care of the elderly. From helping them eat, to helping them to remember medication or taking care of their pets, Hafizullah was there. “Taking care of yourself is one thing, but taking care of somebody else, you know it’s not easy,” said Hafizullah. Hafizullah was up for the challenge and in the process, gained many valuable skills for his field while connecting with locals. “It was something special because I got to know a lot about Kentucky. Just living here it’s different, but then the part of my job was to go to their houses to live with them for six to seven hours” said Hafizullah. One of his client’s families even invited him for a traditional southern meal, with mashed potatoes and gravy. “I got to know them and their families, as well as culture and tradition.” After his experience, Hafizullah came to the decision that he’d like to put his care taking skills to a different test and is now pursuing a degree in sports medicine so that he can help athletes with injuries. Hafizullah encourages everyone getting ready to graduate to apply for their OPT several months in advance as the application usually takes about six months to process. Hafizullah says he still hopes to move to a bigger city one day, but for now, Bowling Green is his home. “In this area, the university and campus included, people are nice and everybody’s helpful, so plans changed. I never moved.”
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/03/hanif_portraits_0003_USE-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/03/hanif_portraits_0003_USE-350x250.jpg
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [title] => ‘Translated Theatre is Valuable:’ WKU senior Becca Willenbrink helps bring Argentine culture to the Theatre Department
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/03/03/translated-theatre-is-valuable-wku-senior-becca-willenbrink-helps-bring-argentine-culture-to-the-theatre-department/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/03/03/translated-theatre-is-valuable-wku-senior-becca-willenbrink-helps-bring-argentine-culture-to-the-theatre-department/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-03-03
            [date] => 2020-03-03
            [description] => Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires, serves as a theatre hub that remains relatively unknown in the U.S. but WKU senior Becca Willenbrink made it her mission last spring to challenge herself by bringing a piece of that culture back home to Kentucky. As a theatre and Spanish major, Willenbrink cites her love of both as a driving factor that led her to translate a play from Spanish to English as part of her FUSE grant. After taking Spanish in high school and studying in Costa Rica, Willenbrink experienced her first Spanish immersion and fell in love with the language. Years later, after becoming proficient in the language, she decided to study abroad in the Spring of 2019 with Sol Education Abroad. As part of her capstone for the Honors College as well as her requirement for her FUSE grant, she started translating Las Casas Íntimitas (The Secret Houses), a play about a woman who is a house sitter that takes the audience through an abstract experience that blurs the lines of reality as her time is chronicled in different houses.  Willenbrink worked closely with the playwright when she began translating the solo performance piece and spent two months working through drafts with student Hailey Armstrong (who plays the character Anís) as she consulted Inmaculada Pertusa, a professor of Spanish and Carol Jordan, an Instructor II and department advisor in the Theatre Department. The biggest struggle Willenbrink said she faced was figuring out literal translations as well as imagery since the character says unusual phrases. “Reading something can sound totally different than when it’s said on stage, so a lot of times translations don’t really do as well,” Willenbrink said. “Or if someone doesn’t really like, do the proper cultural research on like, what this means, how they perform it this way, they don’t really work. And that’s kind of like the problem when we don’t do as many translated stories.” An example comes from a line the character says about drinking dog saliva to calm herself and Willenbrink said she thought it might be a metaphorical saying she wasn’t familiar with since the abstract concept of the play goes in and out of reality.  As Willenbrink’s translation of the Argentine play awaits its debut, she said she hopes that when people go see it they realize the importance of theatre that originates from Argentina. “I just want people to know that Argentine theatre exists because I have taken lots of theatre classes and I’ve never once heard people talk about it,” Willenbrink said. “This is word of mouth also told to me by an Argentine but Buenos Aires has more like independent small theatre spaces than London… but I could walk down almost any neighborhood you’d see a theatre.”  With a lack of translation in the theatrical sphere, Willenbrink said raising awareness about talent that doesn’t get utilized should be focused on more.  “I saw some of the best acting I’ve ever seen when I was there and I just want people to realize that, you know, translated theatre is valuable,” Willenbrink said. As Willenbrink began the process of putting her project together abroad, she received constant affirmation that what she was doing was “cool” and although it may seem like a small thing, she has met people who value her initiative in bringing an Argentine work to the U.S.  The Secret Houses opens 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 2 and will runs until Wednesday, March 3 in the Gordon Wilson Hall Lab Theatre.
            [summary] => Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires, serves as a theatre hub that remains relatively unknown in the U.S. but WKU senior Becca Willenbrink made it her mission last spring to challenge herself by bringing a piece of that culture back home to Kentucky. As a theatre and Spanish major, Willenbrink cites her love of both as a driving factor that led her to translate a play from Spanish to English as part of her FUSE grant. After taking Spanish in high school and studying in Costa Rica, Willenbrink experienced her first Spanish immersion and fell in love with the language. Years later, after becoming proficient in the language, she decided to study abroad in the Spring of 2019 with Sol Education Abroad. As part of her capstone for the Honors College as well as her requirement for her FUSE grant, she started translating Las Casas Íntimitas (The Secret Houses), a play about a woman who is a house sitter that takes the audience through an abstract experience that blurs the lines of reality as her time is chronicled in different houses.  Willenbrink worked closely with the playwright when she began translating the solo performance piece and spent two months working through drafts with student Hailey Armstrong (who plays the character Anís) as she consulted Inmaculada Pertusa, a professor of Spanish and Carol Jordan, an Instructor II and department advisor in the Theatre Department. The biggest struggle Willenbrink said she faced was figuring out literal translations as well as imagery since the character says unusual phrases. “Reading something can sound totally different than when it’s said on stage, so a lot of times translations don’t really do as well,” Willenbrink said. “Or if someone doesn’t really like, do the proper cultural research on like, what this means, how they perform it this way, they don’t really work. And that’s kind of like the problem when we don’t do as many translated stories.” An example comes from a line the character says about drinking dog saliva to calm herself and Willenbrink said she thought it might be a metaphorical saying she wasn’t familiar with since the abstract concept of the play goes in and out of reality.  As Willenbrink’s translation of the Argentine play awaits its debut, she said she hopes that when people go see it they realize the importance of theatre that originates from Argentina. “I just want people to know that Argentine theatre exists because I have taken lots of theatre classes and I’ve never once heard people talk about it,” Willenbrink said. “This is word of mouth also told to me by an Argentine but Buenos Aires has more like independent small theatre spaces than London… but I could walk down almost any neighborhood you’d see a theatre.”  With a lack of translation in the theatrical sphere, Willenbrink said raising awareness about talent that doesn’t get utilized should be focused on more.  “I saw some of the best acting I’ve ever seen when I was there and I just want people to realize that, you know, translated theatre is valuable,” Willenbrink said. As Willenbrink began the process of putting her project together abroad, she received constant affirmation that what she was doing was “cool” and although it may seem like a small thing, she has met people who value her initiative in bringing an Argentine work to the U.S.  The Secret Houses opens 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 2 and will runs until Wednesday, March 3 in the Gordon Wilson Hall Lab Theatre.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/03/IMG_6605-1-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/03/IMG_6605-1-350x250.jpg
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [title] => Responding To Bosnia: The Downing Museum to host a reception & gallery talk featuring the work of two WKU faculty members
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/02/07/responding-to-bosnia-the-downing-museum-to-host-a-reception-gallery-talk-featuring-the-work-of-two-wku-faculty-members/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/02/07/responding-to-bosnia-the-downing-museum-to-host-a-reception-gallery-talk-featuring-the-work-of-two-wku-faculty-members/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-02-07
            [date] => 2020-02-07
            [description] => Post-war struggle and perseverance are still prevalent in the daily lives of those living in Bosnia and Herzegovina decades after a horrific war broke out that lasted several years. Through the exploration of mourning and what it means to return to “normalcy,” two WKU faculty members, photographer James Kenney and artist Yvonne Petkus, utilized the 2017 Zuheir Sofia Endowed International Faculty Seminar (ZSEIFS) fellowship program to make connections with those whose stories illustrate the trials and hardships endured in an effort to overcome a complex past. WKU’s International Year Of series started in 2014 in an effort to recognize different cultures by creating a year-long immersive experience focused on a specific country that includes course-work related to that country, research projects, campus and community events, exhibits, lectures, guest speakers and study abroad opportunities. The 2017-2018 academic year focused on Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country that endured war from 1992-1995, with exhibitions in the Kentucky Museum and Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center. For the 2019-2020 academic year, IYO dedicated an interim year to revisit and reflect on countries from previous IYO’s, including Bosnia and Herzegovina. The names of Petkus’ individualized paintings establish different sentiments in the midst of chaos, with titles such as, “Flight,” “Untitled (Seeker),” “Wreckage” and “Dash (Siege of Sarajevo),” that establishes a common theme throughout her works: trauma. Her impasto technique that builds layers of paint on top of one another creates a blue and black abyss as the barely recognizable features of those caught in the middle of conflict are established with dashes of warm colors in contrast to the brooding landscape in the background. Figures flee and struggle to prevail in nearly every scene Petkus depicts and her artistry makes it seem as if these people are stuck in time, moving slowly through the thick paint but unable to escape their surroundings. Although the contrast in colors separates figures from the background, the paint blends in a way that is symbolic of being dragged by the weight of the war and its remnants that still weigh heavily on those who lived through it. Petkus’ experience in Bosnia led her to focus on a big exhibition called “Proof of Existence” that included 12 Bosnian and Balkan artists ranging from those who still live in Bosnia or are part of the Bosnian diaspora, and one of the artists was one of Petkus’ former students who was the first Bosnian baby born in Bowling Green. “So we tried to make this inclusive exhibit that was about contemplation, understanding and a place to… reflect on the war and people,” Petkus said. Process-based painting is Petkus’ method that allows her to respond to experiences by looking at multiple sources with a philosophical point of view. She has previously responded to other traumatic experiences such as the Boston Marathon bombing, and as a runner herself, said it’s something that has stuck with her that translated to her work about Bosnia. The “running gesture” is a concept that has influenced her work and is prevalent in the aforementioned titles of her work on exhibit at The Downing Museum. “The run gesture has been present in my work even from grad school, and there’s a lot behind that for me – historically, it meant more than just running,” Petkus said. “But when I was in Bosnia, I would see photos taken during the Siege of Sarajevo, of people in a gesture, of what I call a “dash.” They’re running across the street doing their normal activities of getting groceries or trying to go from one place to another, with the threat fo snipers, unseen. This run, I found through my sketches, had a different weight and a different meaning than before and I have since created several ‘Dash’ paintings from those sketches.” While Petkus’ works depict the reality of the midst of war, Kenney’s photographs complement them by giving a glimpse of the aftermath. Some of Kenney’s photos show a genocide memorial established to honor those remembered in the war, while another photo shows a little girl standing in a window who is part of the Banlozi Romani community, a group of victims forgotten by it. Grief, loss, and hope are central to Kenney’s photographs, especially the story of Gina Dzelil, a Bosnian whose family fled the war and eventually ended up in Bowling Green. Her father returned to Bosnia and Herzegovina in an attempt to rescue her grandparents but was ultimately captured and killed. Years later, Gina married and returned to her home country and photos show her visiting her childhood home as well as the area where her father was killed. Petkus and Kenney worked together to create a series of artworks and photographs that captured the essence of what it means for Bosnians to face a new reality after all traces of familiarity has been stripped away from them. Petkus’ oil on canvas paintings paired with Kenney’s photographs collectively depict what it means to move forward while still being tied to the past. Twenty-five years after the Bosnian War, Bosnians are still working on rebuilding their communities, their culture and most importantly, their identities. The reception for the IYO: Responding to Bosnia Exhibition will be Friday, Feb. 7 at 6 p.m. at The Downing Museum, 4801 Morgantown Road. Foods from Bosnia and Herzegovina will be featured, courtesy of WKU’s Office of Global Learning & International Affairs. The exhibition will be on display until April 4.
            [summary] => Post-war struggle and perseverance are still prevalent in the daily lives of those living in Bosnia and Herzegovina decades after a horrific war broke out that lasted several years. Through the exploration of mourning and what it means to return to “normalcy,” two WKU faculty members, photographer James Kenney and artist Yvonne Petkus, utilized the 2017 Zuheir Sofia Endowed International Faculty Seminar (ZSEIFS) fellowship program to make connections with those whose stories illustrate the trials and hardships endured in an effort to overcome a complex past. WKU’s International Year Of series started in 2014 in an effort to recognize different cultures by creating a year-long immersive experience focused on a specific country that includes course-work related to that country, research projects, campus and community events, exhibits, lectures, guest speakers and study abroad opportunities. The 2017-2018 academic year focused on Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country that endured war from 1992-1995, with exhibitions in the Kentucky Museum and Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center. For the 2019-2020 academic year, IYO dedicated an interim year to revisit and reflect on countries from previous IYO’s, including Bosnia and Herzegovina. The names of Petkus’ individualized paintings establish different sentiments in the midst of chaos, with titles such as, “Flight,” “Untitled (Seeker),” “Wreckage” and “Dash (Siege of Sarajevo),” that establishes a common theme throughout her works: trauma. Her impasto technique that builds layers of paint on top of one another creates a blue and black abyss as the barely recognizable features of those caught in the middle of conflict are established with dashes of warm colors in contrast to the brooding landscape in the background. Figures flee and struggle to prevail in nearly every scene Petkus depicts and her artistry makes it seem as if these people are stuck in time, moving slowly through the thick paint but unable to escape their surroundings. Although the contrast in colors separates figures from the background, the paint blends in a way that is symbolic of being dragged by the weight of the war and its remnants that still weigh heavily on those who lived through it. Petkus’ experience in Bosnia led her to focus on a big exhibition called “Proof of Existence” that included 12 Bosnian and Balkan artists ranging from those who still live in Bosnia or are part of the Bosnian diaspora, and one of the artists was one of Petkus’ former students who was the first Bosnian baby born in Bowling Green. “So we tried to make this inclusive exhibit that was about contemplation, understanding and a place to… reflect on the war and people,” Petkus said. Process-based painting is Petkus’ method that allows her to respond to experiences by looking at multiple sources with a philosophical point of view. She has previously responded to other traumatic experiences such as the Boston Marathon bombing, and as a runner herself, said it’s something that has stuck with her that translated to her work about Bosnia. The “running gesture” is a concept that has influenced her work and is prevalent in the aforementioned titles of her work on exhibit at The Downing Museum. “The run gesture has been present in my work even from grad school, and there’s a lot behind that for me – historically, it meant more than just running,” Petkus said. “But when I was in Bosnia, I would see photos taken during the Siege of Sarajevo, of people in a gesture, of what I call a “dash.” They’re running across the street doing their normal activities of getting groceries or trying to go from one place to another, with the threat fo snipers, unseen. This run, I found through my sketches, had a different weight and a different meaning than before and I have since created several ‘Dash’ paintings from those sketches.” While Petkus’ works depict the reality of the midst of war, Kenney’s photographs complement them by giving a glimpse of the aftermath. Some of Kenney’s photos show a genocide memorial established to honor those remembered in the war, while another photo shows a little girl standing in a window who is part of the Banlozi Romani community, a group of victims forgotten by it. Grief, loss, and hope are central to Kenney’s photographs, especially the story of Gina Dzelil, a Bosnian whose family fled the war and eventually ended up in Bowling Green. Her father returned to Bosnia and Herzegovina in an attempt to rescue her grandparents but was ultimately captured and killed. Years later, Gina married and returned to her home country and photos show her visiting her childhood home as well as the area where her father was killed. Petkus and Kenney worked together to create a series of artworks and photographs that captured the essence of what it means for Bosnians to face a new reality after all traces of familiarity has been stripped away from them. Petkus’ oil on canvas paintings paired with Kenney’s photographs collectively depict what it means to move forward while still being tied to the past. Twenty-five years after the Bosnian War, Bosnians are still working on rebuilding their communities, their culture and most importantly, their identities. The reception for the IYO: Responding to Bosnia Exhibition will be Friday, Feb. 7 at 6 p.m. at The Downing Museum, 4801 Morgantown Road. Foods from Bosnia and Herzegovina will be featured, courtesy of WKU’s Office of Global Learning & International Affairs. The exhibition will be on display until April 4.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/02/Screen-Shot-2020-02-06-at-7.45.02-PM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/02/Screen-Shot-2020-02-06-at-7.45.02-PM-350x250.png
        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [title] => The Olympian
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/01/16/the-olympian/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/01/16/the-olympian/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-01-16
            [date] => 2020-01-16
            [description] => Eight years ago, Emmanuel Dasor was watching the London 2012 Summer Olympics on the T.V.  with his friends. This was the same year Usain Bolt broke the Olympic record for the 100-meter dash with a time of 9.63 seconds. Dasor, who did not have much experience running yet, told himself he would be in the Olympics one day. “I told myself I would be in the Olympics. My friends believed in me…They said yeah, you can do it,” said Dasor.  Dasor stuck true to his word. Dasor was recruited to the track and field team at Western where he worked with coach Erik Jenkins to train for the Olympics. While at Western, Dasor set 6 school records such as the 60-meter indoor dash record with a time of 6.68 seconds, the 200-meter indoor dash meter with a time of 20.89 seconds, and the 400-meter record with a time of 46.21 seconds. “I work myself hard every day. Every day, I never stopped working,” said Dasor.  That hard work paid off. Dasor qualified for the 2016 summer Olympics in Rio, running for his home country of Ghana.  During his time at WKU, Dasor has not just been training for the Olympics but also connecting to the campus community. He says he liked WKU for its diversity and the fact that it is located so close to everything, but also because of the people.  “People are lovely here; the President, the international office, and the students. Everybody is just lovely wherever you go.” 
            [summary] => Eight years ago, Emmanuel Dasor was watching the London 2012 Summer Olympics on the T.V.  with his friends. This was the same year Usain Bolt broke the Olympic record for the 100-meter dash with a time of 9.63 seconds. Dasor, who did not have much experience running yet, told himself he would be in the Olympics one day. “I told myself I would be in the Olympics. My friends believed in me…They said yeah, you can do it,” said Dasor.  Dasor stuck true to his word. Dasor was recruited to the track and field team at Western where he worked with coach Erik Jenkins to train for the Olympics. While at Western, Dasor set 6 school records such as the 60-meter indoor dash record with a time of 6.68 seconds, the 200-meter indoor dash meter with a time of 20.89 seconds, and the 400-meter record with a time of 46.21 seconds. “I work myself hard every day. Every day, I never stopped working,” said Dasor.  That hard work paid off. Dasor qualified for the 2016 summer Olympics in Rio, running for his home country of Ghana.  During his time at WKU, Dasor has not just been training for the Olympics but also connecting to the campus community. He says he liked WKU for its diversity and the fact that it is located so close to everything, but also because of the people.  “People are lovely here; the President, the international office, and the students. Everybody is just lovely wherever you go.” 
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/01/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-9.22.09-AM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/01/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-9.22.09-AM-350x250.png
        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [title] => Winter Break Resources
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/13/winter-break-resources/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/13/winter-break-resources/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-12-13
            [date] => 2019-12-13
            [description] => With winter break just around the corner, diplomats Kate and Abdullah have compiled a list of places on and off campus that are open during winter break. Check it out! Cravens library will be closed after 4:30 on Friday, December 13th. They will reopen on Jan. 6th, Monday-Friday from 8am-4:30pm. More info can be found here. Except for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day (Dec. 24th, 25th, 31st, and Jan. 1st), Preston will have the following hours from Dec. 16th through Jan. 1st: Fitness Center: Monday – Friday 6am-6pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday – Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-5:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Except for being closed on Jan. 20th for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, from Jan. 6th to Jan. 26th, Preston will have the following hours: Fitness Center: Monday-Friday 6am-8pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday-Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-7:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Preston Center will return to normal operating hours on Jan. 26th. The computer lab at JRH will be closed from Dec. 14th to Jan. 5th and reopens Jan. 6th. All of WKU’s buses will be out of service until spring semester begins, except the Shopping Shuttle will run on Wednesday and Saturday of intersession service and holidays. BG’s Go bus comes through campus; however. You can explore BG Go’s bus routes, schedules and prices here. The residence halls will close on Saturday, December 14, 2019 at 6pm for winter break, with the exception of Douglas Keen, Northeast, and Hilltopper Halls. All residence halls will reopen on Friday, January 24, 2020 at 8am. 6. Off-Campus Resources — Groceries Wal-Mart: 12/24: Closes approximately 7:00 PM 12/ 25: Closed 12/26: Opens 7:00 AM, resumes normal hours (open 24/7) Meijer: 12/24 – Closes at 7:00 PM 12/25- Closed 12/26 – Opens 6:00 AM, resumes normal hours (Open 24/7) Target: 12/ 24: Closes at 10 PM 12/25: Closed 12/ 26: Resumes normal hours Kroger: 12/25 – Closed all-day 12/26- Opens at 7:00 AM 12/31- Closes at 9:00 PM 1/1- Opens at 7:00 AM 7. Off-Campus Resources — Restaurants Waffle House: all locations open Dec. 24th and 25th Zaxby’s Chicken: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 9:30pm, Friday-Saturday 10:45 – 10:00pm Taco Bell: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 7 am – 12 am, Friday & Saturday 7 am – 2 am Arby’s: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10am – 11pm, Friday & Saturday 10am – 12am Chili’s Bar & Grill: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 10pm, Friday & Saturday 10:45am – 11:30pm Mellow Mushroom: Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm, Friday-Saturday 11am-11pm For more restaurant holiday’s hours, check out WBKO’s list.
            [summary] => With winter break just around the corner, diplomats Kate and Abdullah have compiled a list of places on and off campus that are open during winter break. Check it out! Cravens library will be closed after 4:30 on Friday, December 13th. They will reopen on Jan. 6th, Monday-Friday from 8am-4:30pm. More info can be found here. Except for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day (Dec. 24th, 25th, 31st, and Jan. 1st), Preston will have the following hours from Dec. 16th through Jan. 1st: Fitness Center: Monday – Friday 6am-6pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday – Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-5:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Except for being closed on Jan. 20th for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, from Jan. 6th to Jan. 26th, Preston will have the following hours: Fitness Center: Monday-Friday 6am-8pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday-Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-7:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Preston Center will return to normal operating hours on Jan. 26th. The computer lab at JRH will be closed from Dec. 14th to Jan. 5th and reopens Jan. 6th. All of WKU’s buses will be out of service until spring semester begins, except the Shopping Shuttle will run on Wednesday and Saturday of intersession service and holidays. BG’s Go bus comes through campus; however. You can explore BG Go’s bus routes, schedules and prices here. The residence halls will close on Saturday, December 14, 2019 at 6pm for winter break, with the exception of Douglas Keen, Northeast, and Hilltopper Halls. All residence halls will reopen on Friday, January 24, 2020 at 8am. 6. Off-Campus Resources — Groceries Wal-Mart: 12/24: Closes approximately 7:00 PM 12/ 25: Closed 12/26: Opens 7:00 AM, resumes normal hours (open 24/7) Meijer: 12/24 – Closes at 7:00 PM 12/25- Closed 12/26 – Opens 6:00 AM, resumes normal hours (Open 24/7) Target: 12/ 24: Closes at 10 PM 12/25: Closed 12/ 26: Resumes normal hours Kroger: 12/25 – Closed all-day 12/26- Opens at 7:00 AM 12/31- Closes at 9:00 PM 1/1- Opens at 7:00 AM 7. Off-Campus Resources — Restaurants Waffle House: all locations open Dec. 24th and 25th Zaxby’s Chicken: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 9:30pm, Friday-Saturday 10:45 – 10:00pm Taco Bell: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 7 am – 12 am, Friday & Saturday 7 am – 2 am Arby’s: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10am – 11pm, Friday & Saturday 10am – 12am Chili’s Bar & Grill: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 10pm, Friday & Saturday 10:45am – 11:30pm Mellow Mushroom: Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm, Friday-Saturday 11am-11pm For more restaurant holiday’s hours, check out WBKO’s list.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/12/1-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/12/1-350x250.png
        )

    [7] => Array
        (
            [title] => Best Places to Study Around Campus
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/04/best-places-to-study-around-campus/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/04/best-places-to-study-around-campus/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-12-04
            [date] => 2019-12-04
            [description] => Finals are just around the corner, so international student diplomats Joel and Gabby are here to tell you about their favorite study spots on campus. The DSU Study Lounge , has  many comfortable chairs, sofas, and tables that are great to share with friends while you study together. You can even schedule free tutoring sessions. Plus, you are near to DSU food court, and the rec room whenever you need to recharge between study sessions! It offers all the facilities you need to feel comfortable and give the best of yourself in your studying process. Click here to see the Study Lounge hours. This  building offers you many areas for studying. Not just comfortable sofas and big tables you can share with friends, but  private study rooms.If you are taking any language or honors classes, this might be your spot. If you need to change your environment while still taking full advantage of your studying time, Starbucks offers you what you are looking for. The smell of coffee and good music makes for a welcoming environment for students and coffee lovers. All this makes the studying daily activity such an enjoyable experience. You can always go for more coffee if you feel tired and enjoy it with friends. Jody Richards Hall, formerly known as Mass Media and Technology Hall, is the home of the School of Media, and is endowed with electronic classrooms, photojournalism labs, a 24-hour computer lab and a 250 seat auditorium. The third floor in MMTH is also great for study especially if you prefer a quiet atmosphere. The Registry Club House at the Registry apartment complex near campus is a community center open to all students. to help support their productivity by giving them a fully equipped computer lab and individual study rooms at their fingertips. It is equipped with an on-site state-of-the-art fitness facilities to keep you healthy. The clubhouse at Registry Bowling Green provides a unique center off campus to stay engaged with your books in an enjoyable atmosphere.
            [summary] => Finals are just around the corner, so international student diplomats Joel and Gabby are here to tell you about their favorite study spots on campus. The DSU Study Lounge , has  many comfortable chairs, sofas, and tables that are great to share with friends while you study together. You can even schedule free tutoring sessions. Plus, you are near to DSU food court, and the rec room whenever you need to recharge between study sessions! It offers all the facilities you need to feel comfortable and give the best of yourself in your studying process. Click here to see the Study Lounge hours. This  building offers you many areas for studying. Not just comfortable sofas and big tables you can share with friends, but  private study rooms.If you are taking any language or honors classes, this might be your spot. If you need to change your environment while still taking full advantage of your studying time, Starbucks offers you what you are looking for. The smell of coffee and good music makes for a welcoming environment for students and coffee lovers. All this makes the studying daily activity such an enjoyable experience. You can always go for more coffee if you feel tired and enjoy it with friends. Jody Richards Hall, formerly known as Mass Media and Technology Hall, is the home of the School of Media, and is endowed with electronic classrooms, photojournalism labs, a 24-hour computer lab and a 250 seat auditorium. The third floor in MMTH is also great for study especially if you prefer a quiet atmosphere. The Registry Club House at the Registry apartment complex near campus is a community center open to all students. to help support their productivity by giving them a fully equipped computer lab and individual study rooms at their fingertips. It is equipped with an on-site state-of-the-art fitness facilities to keep you healthy. The clubhouse at Registry Bowling Green provides a unique center off campus to stay engaged with your books in an enjoyable atmosphere.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/1-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/1-350x250.png
        )

    [8] => Array
        (
            [title] => Student Spotlight: Peruvian Amelia Ampuero serves Bowling Green community with internship at local veterinarian clinic
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/26/student-spotlight-peruvian-amelia-ampuero-serves-bowling-green-community-with-internship-at-local-veterinarian-clinic/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/26/student-spotlight-peruvian-amelia-ampuero-serves-bowling-green-community-with-internship-at-local-veterinarian-clinic/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-26
            [date] => 2019-11-26
            [description] => You may know Amelia as one of the front desk staff for ISSS & Study Abroad & Global Learning, however, aside from serving students with a warm & friendly smile in HCIC suite 1014, she’s taking advantage of some incredible learning opportunities outside the classroom and off campus at All Creatures Animal Hospital. Video by: Jake Stevenson
            [summary] => You may know Amelia as one of the front desk staff for ISSS & Study Abroad & Global Learning, however, aside from serving students with a warm & friendly smile in HCIC suite 1014, she’s taking advantage of some incredible learning opportunities outside the classroom and off campus at All Creatures Animal Hospital. Video by: Jake Stevenson
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-1.42.16-PM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-1.42.16-PM-350x250.png
        )

    [9] => Array
        (
            [title] => Ayman Alwehaibi – WKU Student Receives Internship at Tristar Greenview Hospital
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/21/ayman-alwehaibi-wku-student-receives-internship-at-tristar-greenview-hospital/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/21/ayman-alwehaibi-wku-student-receives-internship-at-tristar-greenview-hospital/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-21
            [date] => 2019-11-21
            [description] => Ayman Alwehaibi from Buraydah, Saudi Arabia, came to Western Kentucky University as a transfer student in 2017. Alwehaibi says he wishes he would have known about the school sooner. It was not until an acquaintance who was also a student at Western Kentucky University introduced Ayman to the school that he applied and was accepted that he transferred to WKU to pursue a degree in health care administration. “I’m glad I transferred here because everybody is friendly, helpful, and everybody wants you to succeed,” said Ayman. Ayman says he especially found this to be true when Melanie Eaton, a faculty member of the public health department at WKU, helped him get an internship in his desired field of health care administration.  “If Eaton wasn’t there, giving me that hand to help me, I wouldn’t have gotten the [internship].” Ayman interned at TriStar Greenview from January to August of this year. During his internship, he helped with several areas of hospital administration, especially in administration, an area he wanted to gain direct experience with. Ayman aided in buying and selling medical equipment for the hospital, gathering and dispersing information on patient and employee satisfaction, as well as transferring calls to desired areas of the hospital.  Ayman says that if he could give advice to his fellow international students it would be this:  “Don’t waste your time, come here. You’re going to find yourself. Everybody feels that we are one community which is great. That’s what I love [about] WKU.”
            [summary] => Ayman Alwehaibi from Buraydah, Saudi Arabia, came to Western Kentucky University as a transfer student in 2017. Alwehaibi says he wishes he would have known about the school sooner. It was not until an acquaintance who was also a student at Western Kentucky University introduced Ayman to the school that he applied and was accepted that he transferred to WKU to pursue a degree in health care administration. “I’m glad I transferred here because everybody is friendly, helpful, and everybody wants you to succeed,” said Ayman. Ayman says he especially found this to be true when Melanie Eaton, a faculty member of the public health department at WKU, helped him get an internship in his desired field of health care administration.  “If Eaton wasn’t there, giving me that hand to help me, I wouldn’t have gotten the [internship].” Ayman interned at TriStar Greenview from January to August of this year. During his internship, he helped with several areas of hospital administration, especially in administration, an area he wanted to gain direct experience with. Ayman aided in buying and selling medical equipment for the hospital, gathering and dispersing information on patient and employee satisfaction, as well as transferring calls to desired areas of the hospital.  Ayman says that if he could give advice to his fellow international students it would be this:  “Don’t waste your time, come here. You’re going to find yourself. Everybody feels that we are one community which is great. That’s what I love [about] WKU.”
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/B3_6914-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/B3_6914-350x250.jpg
        )

)
  

 


 

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