Facebook Pixel WKU International Recruitment Partners | Western Kentucky University

 

Skip to main content

WKU International Partner Resources


inforgaphic about WKU

 

Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public institution that offers an authentic American experience in the beautiful and lively city of Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Our hilltop campus is a place of diversity and friendliness. It embraces a proud heritage and a bold, ambitious future. WKU is home to many highly ranked and nationally recognized academic programs such as Business/Management, Journalism and Broadcasting, Engineering, Computer Science, Social Sciences, and Math, including an award-winning speech and debate team.  

In addition to our top academic programs, WKU is also home to competitive Division I Athletic teams including tennis, basketball, soccer, and football.  More than 20,000 students grace WKU's campus, including students from over 60 countries. WKU is one of four nationally recognized Safe Communities America by the National Safety Council and is ranked as one of the most beautiful southern campuses by U.S. News.  Centrally located and easily accessible to many major U.S. cities, WKU is known for the southern hospitality and charm that Kentucky has to offer.  Bowling Green, Kentucky (home to WKU) is ranked one of the top 10 U.S. college towns. 

Watch an incredible video that shows what it is like to be an international student on our campus, download our international student brochures and schedule time to video chat or WhatsApp with a current international student below.


 

 Video Preview

 


  

 

WKU International View Book
Western Kentucky University Overview

WKU Admissions and cost for international students studying in the usa

 

Funding Opportunities 
International Scholarships

Scholarship opportunities for international students studying in the USA

 


 

 

We're here to help students apply! 

 checklist

 Video Preview

 

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

 

 

checklist

  

 

GET YOUR EASY APPLICATION CHECKLIST HERE

 


 

Questions? We're here to help!

Want to know what it's really like to be a student at WKU? Schedule a one-on-one 
Skype or WhatsApp chat with one of our student diplomats! 

2019-20 Diplomats

 

CHAT WITH A DIPLOMAT

  

 

 

 

CONTACT US: 

EMAIL: iem@wku.edu

Phone: +1270-745-4857

facebook icon Instagram Icon WKU International WKU International YouTube  iWKU 


CHAT WITH AN ADMISSIONS COUNSELOR 


Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [title] => Responding To Bosnia: The Downing Museum to host a reception & gallery talk featuring the work of two WKU faculty members
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/02/07/responding-to-bosnia-the-downing-museum-to-host-a-reception-gallery-talk-featuring-the-work-of-two-wku-faculty-members/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/02/07/responding-to-bosnia-the-downing-museum-to-host-a-reception-gallery-talk-featuring-the-work-of-two-wku-faculty-members/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-02-07
            [date] => 2020-02-07
            [description] => Post-war struggle and perseverance are still prevalent in the daily lives of those living in Bosnia and Herzegovina decades after a horrific war broke out that lasted several years. Through the exploration of mourning and what it means to return to “normalcy,” two WKU faculty members, photographer James Kenney and artist Yvonne Petkus, utilized the 2017 Zuheir Sofia Endowed International Faculty Seminar (ZSEIFS) fellowship program to make connections with those whose stories illustrate the trials and hardships endured in an effort to overcome a complex past. WKU’s International Year Of series started in 2014 in an effort to recognize different cultures by creating a year-long immersive experience focused on a specific country that includes course-work related to that country, research projects, campus and community events, exhibits, lectures, guest speakers and study abroad opportunities. The 2017-2018 academic year focused on Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country that endured war from 1992-1995, with exhibitions in the Kentucky Museum and Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center. For the 2019-2020 academic year, IYO dedicated an interim year to revisit and reflect on countries from previous IYO’s, including Bosnia and Herzegovina. The names of Petkus’ individualized paintings establish different sentiments in the midst of chaos, with titles such as, “Flight,” “Untitled (Seeker),” “Wreckage” and “Dash (Siege of Sarajevo),” that establishes a common theme throughout her works: trauma. Her impasto technique that builds layers of paint on top of one another creates a blue and black abyss as the barely recognizable features of those caught in the middle of conflict are established with dashes of warm colors in contrast to the brooding landscape in the background. Figures flee and struggle to prevail in nearly every scene Petkus depicts and her artistry makes it seem as if these people are stuck in time, moving slowly through the thick paint but unable to escape their surroundings. Although the contrast in colors separates figures from the background, the paint blends in a way that is symbolic of being dragged by the weight of the war and its remnants that still weigh heavily on those who lived through it. Petkus’ experience in Bosnia led her to focus on a big exhibition called “Proof of Existence” that included 12 Bosnian and Balkan artists ranging from those who still live in Bosnia or are part of the Bosnian diaspora, and one of the artists was one of Petkus’ former students who was the first Bosnian baby born in Bowling Green. “So we tried to make this inclusive exhibit that was about contemplation, understanding and a place to… reflect on the war and people,” Petkus said. Process-based painting is Petkus’ method that allows her to respond to experiences by looking at multiple sources with a philosophical point of view. She has previously responded to other traumatic experiences such as the Boston Marathon bombing, and as a runner herself, said it’s something that has stuck with her that translated to her work about Bosnia. The “running gesture” is a concept that has influenced her work and is prevalent in the aforementioned titles of her work on exhibit at The Downing Museum. “The run gesture has been present in my work even from grad school, and there’s a lot behind that for me – historically, it meant more than just running,” Petkus said. “But when I was in Bosnia, I would see photos taken during the Siege of Sarajevo, of people in a gesture, of what I call a “dash.” They’re running across the street doing their normal activities of getting groceries or trying to go from one place to another, with the threat fo snipers, unseen. This run, I found through my sketches, had a different weight and a different meaning than before and I have since created several ‘Dash’ paintings from those sketches.” While Petkus’ works depict the reality of the midst of war, Kenney’s photographs complement them by giving a glimpse of the aftermath. Some of Kenney’s photos show a genocide memorial established to honor those remembered in the war, while another photo shows a little girl standing in a window who is part of the Banlozi Romani community, a group of victims forgotten by it. Grief, loss, and hope are central to Kenney’s photographs, especially the story of Gina Dzelil, a Bosnian whose family fled the war and eventually ended up in Bowling Green. Her father returned to Bosnia and Herzegovina in an attempt to rescue her grandparents but was ultimately captured and killed. Years later, Gina married and returned to her home country and photos show her visiting her childhood home as well as the area where her father was killed. Petkus and Kenney worked together to create a series of artworks and photographs that captured the essence of what it means for Bosnians to face a new reality after all traces of familiarity has been stripped away from them. Petkus’ oil on canvas paintings paired with Kenney’s photographs collectively depict what it means to move forward while still being tied to the past. Twenty-five years after the Bosnian War, Bosnians are still working on rebuilding their communities, their culture and most importantly, their identities. The reception for the IYO: Responding to Bosnia Exhibition will be Friday, Feb. 7 at 6 p.m. at The Downing Museum, 4801 Morgantown Road. Foods from Bosnia and Herzegovina will be featured, courtesy of WKU’s Office of Global Learning & International Affairs. The exhibition will be on display until April 4.
            [summary] => Post-war struggle and perseverance are still prevalent in the daily lives of those living in Bosnia and Herzegovina decades after a horrific war broke out that lasted several years. Through the exploration of mourning and what it means to return to “normalcy,” two WKU faculty members, photographer James Kenney and artist Yvonne Petkus, utilized the 2017 Zuheir Sofia Endowed International Faculty Seminar (ZSEIFS) fellowship program to make connections with those whose stories illustrate the trials and hardships endured in an effort to overcome a complex past. WKU’s International Year Of series started in 2014 in an effort to recognize different cultures by creating a year-long immersive experience focused on a specific country that includes course-work related to that country, research projects, campus and community events, exhibits, lectures, guest speakers and study abroad opportunities. The 2017-2018 academic year focused on Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country that endured war from 1992-1995, with exhibitions in the Kentucky Museum and Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center. For the 2019-2020 academic year, IYO dedicated an interim year to revisit and reflect on countries from previous IYO’s, including Bosnia and Herzegovina. The names of Petkus’ individualized paintings establish different sentiments in the midst of chaos, with titles such as, “Flight,” “Untitled (Seeker),” “Wreckage” and “Dash (Siege of Sarajevo),” that establishes a common theme throughout her works: trauma. Her impasto technique that builds layers of paint on top of one another creates a blue and black abyss as the barely recognizable features of those caught in the middle of conflict are established with dashes of warm colors in contrast to the brooding landscape in the background. Figures flee and struggle to prevail in nearly every scene Petkus depicts and her artistry makes it seem as if these people are stuck in time, moving slowly through the thick paint but unable to escape their surroundings. Although the contrast in colors separates figures from the background, the paint blends in a way that is symbolic of being dragged by the weight of the war and its remnants that still weigh heavily on those who lived through it. Petkus’ experience in Bosnia led her to focus on a big exhibition called “Proof of Existence” that included 12 Bosnian and Balkan artists ranging from those who still live in Bosnia or are part of the Bosnian diaspora, and one of the artists was one of Petkus’ former students who was the first Bosnian baby born in Bowling Green. “So we tried to make this inclusive exhibit that was about contemplation, understanding and a place to… reflect on the war and people,” Petkus said. Process-based painting is Petkus’ method that allows her to respond to experiences by looking at multiple sources with a philosophical point of view. She has previously responded to other traumatic experiences such as the Boston Marathon bombing, and as a runner herself, said it’s something that has stuck with her that translated to her work about Bosnia. The “running gesture” is a concept that has influenced her work and is prevalent in the aforementioned titles of her work on exhibit at The Downing Museum. “The run gesture has been present in my work even from grad school, and there’s a lot behind that for me – historically, it meant more than just running,” Petkus said. “But when I was in Bosnia, I would see photos taken during the Siege of Sarajevo, of people in a gesture, of what I call a “dash.” They’re running across the street doing their normal activities of getting groceries or trying to go from one place to another, with the threat fo snipers, unseen. This run, I found through my sketches, had a different weight and a different meaning than before and I have since created several ‘Dash’ paintings from those sketches.” While Petkus’ works depict the reality of the midst of war, Kenney’s photographs complement them by giving a glimpse of the aftermath. Some of Kenney’s photos show a genocide memorial established to honor those remembered in the war, while another photo shows a little girl standing in a window who is part of the Banlozi Romani community, a group of victims forgotten by it. Grief, loss, and hope are central to Kenney’s photographs, especially the story of Gina Dzelil, a Bosnian whose family fled the war and eventually ended up in Bowling Green. Her father returned to Bosnia and Herzegovina in an attempt to rescue her grandparents but was ultimately captured and killed. Years later, Gina married and returned to her home country and photos show her visiting her childhood home as well as the area where her father was killed. Petkus and Kenney worked together to create a series of artworks and photographs that captured the essence of what it means for Bosnians to face a new reality after all traces of familiarity has been stripped away from them. Petkus’ oil on canvas paintings paired with Kenney’s photographs collectively depict what it means to move forward while still being tied to the past. Twenty-five years after the Bosnian War, Bosnians are still working on rebuilding their communities, their culture and most importantly, their identities. The reception for the IYO: Responding to Bosnia Exhibition will be Friday, Feb. 7 at 6 p.m. at The Downing Museum, 4801 Morgantown Road. Foods from Bosnia and Herzegovina will be featured, courtesy of WKU’s Office of Global Learning & International Affairs. The exhibition will be on display until April 4.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/02/Screen-Shot-2020-02-06-at-7.45.02-PM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/02/Screen-Shot-2020-02-06-at-7.45.02-PM-350x250.png
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [title] => The Olympian
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/01/16/the-olympian/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2020/01/16/the-olympian/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2020-01-16
            [date] => 2020-01-16
            [description] => Eight years ago, Emmanuel Dasor was watching the London 2012 Summer Olympics on the T.V.  with his friends. This was the same year Usain Bolt broke the Olympic record for the 100-meter dash with a time of 9.63 seconds. Dasor, who did not have much experience running yet, told himself he would be in the Olympics one day. “I told myself I would be in the Olympics. My friends believed in me…They said yeah, you can do it,” said Dasor.  Dasor stuck true to his word. Dasor was recruited to the track and field team at Western where he worked with coach Erik Jenkins to train for the Olympics. While at Western, Dasor set 6 school records such as the 60-meter indoor dash record with a time of 6.68 seconds, the 200-meter indoor dash meter with a time of 20.89 seconds, and the 400-meter record with a time of 46.21 seconds. “I work myself hard every day. Every day, I never stopped working,” said Dasor.  That hard work paid off. Dasor qualified for the 2016 summer Olympics in Rio, running for his home country of Ghana.  During his time at WKU, Dasor has not just been training for the Olympics but also connecting to the campus community. He says he liked WKU for its diversity and the fact that it is located so close to everything, but also because of the people.  “People are lovely here; the President, the international office, and the students. Everybody is just lovely wherever you go.” 
            [summary] => Eight years ago, Emmanuel Dasor was watching the London 2012 Summer Olympics on the T.V.  with his friends. This was the same year Usain Bolt broke the Olympic record for the 100-meter dash with a time of 9.63 seconds. Dasor, who did not have much experience running yet, told himself he would be in the Olympics one day. “I told myself I would be in the Olympics. My friends believed in me…They said yeah, you can do it,” said Dasor.  Dasor stuck true to his word. Dasor was recruited to the track and field team at Western where he worked with coach Erik Jenkins to train for the Olympics. While at Western, Dasor set 6 school records such as the 60-meter indoor dash record with a time of 6.68 seconds, the 200-meter indoor dash meter with a time of 20.89 seconds, and the 400-meter record with a time of 46.21 seconds. “I work myself hard every day. Every day, I never stopped working,” said Dasor.  That hard work paid off. Dasor qualified for the 2016 summer Olympics in Rio, running for his home country of Ghana.  During his time at WKU, Dasor has not just been training for the Olympics but also connecting to the campus community. He says he liked WKU for its diversity and the fact that it is located so close to everything, but also because of the people.  “People are lovely here; the President, the international office, and the students. Everybody is just lovely wherever you go.” 
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/01/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-9.22.09-AM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2020/01/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-9.22.09-AM-350x250.png
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [title] => Winter Break Resources
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/13/winter-break-resources/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/13/winter-break-resources/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-12-13
            [date] => 2019-12-13
            [description] => With winter break just around the corner, diplomats Kate and Abdullah have compiled a list of places on and off campus that are open during winter break. Check it out! Cravens library will be closed after 4:30 on Friday, December 13th. They will reopen on Jan. 6th, Monday-Friday from 8am-4:30pm. More info can be found here. Except for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day (Dec. 24th, 25th, 31st, and Jan. 1st), Preston will have the following hours from Dec. 16th through Jan. 1st: Fitness Center: Monday – Friday 6am-6pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday – Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-5:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Except for being closed on Jan. 20th for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, from Jan. 6th to Jan. 26th, Preston will have the following hours: Fitness Center: Monday-Friday 6am-8pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday-Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-7:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Preston Center will return to normal operating hours on Jan. 26th. The computer lab at JRH will be closed from Dec. 14th to Jan. 5th and reopens Jan. 6th. All of WKU’s buses will be out of service until spring semester begins, except the Shopping Shuttle will run on Wednesday and Saturday of intersession service and holidays. BG’s Go bus comes through campus; however. You can explore BG Go’s bus routes, schedules and prices here. The residence halls will close on Saturday, December 14, 2019 at 6pm for winter break, with the exception of Douglas Keen, Northeast, and Hilltopper Halls. All residence halls will reopen on Friday, January 24, 2020 at 8am. 6. Off-Campus Resources — Groceries Wal-Mart: 12/24: Closes approximately 7:00 PM 12/ 25: Closed 12/26: Opens 7:00 AM, resumes normal hours (open 24/7) Meijer: 12/24 – Closes at 7:00 PM 12/25- Closed 12/26 – Opens 6:00 AM, resumes normal hours (Open 24/7) Target: 12/ 24: Closes at 10 PM 12/25: Closed 12/ 26: Resumes normal hours Kroger: 12/25 – Closed all-day 12/26- Opens at 7:00 AM 12/31- Closes at 9:00 PM 1/1- Opens at 7:00 AM 7. Off-Campus Resources — Restaurants Waffle House: all locations open Dec. 24th and 25th Zaxby’s Chicken: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 9:30pm, Friday-Saturday 10:45 – 10:00pm Taco Bell: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 7 am – 12 am, Friday & Saturday 7 am – 2 am Arby’s: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10am – 11pm, Friday & Saturday 10am – 12am Chili’s Bar & Grill: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 10pm, Friday & Saturday 10:45am – 11:30pm Mellow Mushroom: Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm, Friday-Saturday 11am-11pm For more restaurant holiday’s hours, check out WBKO’s list.
            [summary] => With winter break just around the corner, diplomats Kate and Abdullah have compiled a list of places on and off campus that are open during winter break. Check it out! Cravens library will be closed after 4:30 on Friday, December 13th. They will reopen on Jan. 6th, Monday-Friday from 8am-4:30pm. More info can be found here. Except for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day (Dec. 24th, 25th, 31st, and Jan. 1st), Preston will have the following hours from Dec. 16th through Jan. 1st: Fitness Center: Monday – Friday 6am-6pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday – Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-5:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Except for being closed on Jan. 20th for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, from Jan. 6th to Jan. 26th, Preston will have the following hours: Fitness Center: Monday-Friday 6am-8pm, Saturday 9am-6pm, Sunday 1pm-6pm Natatorium: Monday-Friday 6am-9am, 11:30am-1pm, 3pm-7:30pm, Saturday 9am-5:30pm, Sunday 1pm-5:30pm Preston Center will return to normal operating hours on Jan. 26th. The computer lab at JRH will be closed from Dec. 14th to Jan. 5th and reopens Jan. 6th. All of WKU’s buses will be out of service until spring semester begins, except the Shopping Shuttle will run on Wednesday and Saturday of intersession service and holidays. BG’s Go bus comes through campus; however. You can explore BG Go’s bus routes, schedules and prices here. The residence halls will close on Saturday, December 14, 2019 at 6pm for winter break, with the exception of Douglas Keen, Northeast, and Hilltopper Halls. All residence halls will reopen on Friday, January 24, 2020 at 8am. 6. Off-Campus Resources — Groceries Wal-Mart: 12/24: Closes approximately 7:00 PM 12/ 25: Closed 12/26: Opens 7:00 AM, resumes normal hours (open 24/7) Meijer: 12/24 – Closes at 7:00 PM 12/25- Closed 12/26 – Opens 6:00 AM, resumes normal hours (Open 24/7) Target: 12/ 24: Closes at 10 PM 12/25: Closed 12/ 26: Resumes normal hours Kroger: 12/25 – Closed all-day 12/26- Opens at 7:00 AM 12/31- Closes at 9:00 PM 1/1- Opens at 7:00 AM 7. Off-Campus Resources — Restaurants Waffle House: all locations open Dec. 24th and 25th Zaxby’s Chicken: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 9:30pm, Friday-Saturday 10:45 – 10:00pm Taco Bell: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 7 am – 12 am, Friday & Saturday 7 am – 2 am Arby’s: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10am – 11pm, Friday & Saturday 10am – 12am Chili’s Bar & Grill: Monday – Thursday & Sunday 10:45am – 10pm, Friday & Saturday 10:45am – 11:30pm Mellow Mushroom: Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm, Friday-Saturday 11am-11pm For more restaurant holiday’s hours, check out WBKO’s list.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/12/1-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/12/1-350x250.png
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [title] => Best Places to Study Around Campus
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/04/best-places-to-study-around-campus/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/12/04/best-places-to-study-around-campus/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-12-04
            [date] => 2019-12-04
            [description] => Finals are just around the corner, so international student diplomats Joel and Gabby are here to tell you about their favorite study spots on campus. The DSU Study Lounge , has  many comfortable chairs, sofas, and tables that are great to share with friends while you study together. You can even schedule free tutoring sessions. Plus, you are near to DSU food court, and the rec room whenever you need to recharge between study sessions! It offers all the facilities you need to feel comfortable and give the best of yourself in your studying process. Click here to see the Study Lounge hours. This  building offers you many areas for studying. Not just comfortable sofas and big tables you can share with friends, but  private study rooms.If you are taking any language or honors classes, this might be your spot. If you need to change your environment while still taking full advantage of your studying time, Starbucks offers you what you are looking for. The smell of coffee and good music makes for a welcoming environment for students and coffee lovers. All this makes the studying daily activity such an enjoyable experience. You can always go for more coffee if you feel tired and enjoy it with friends. Jody Richards Hall, formerly known as Mass Media and Technology Hall, is the home of the School of Media, and is endowed with electronic classrooms, photojournalism labs, a 24-hour computer lab and a 250 seat auditorium. The third floor in MMTH is also great for study especially if you prefer a quiet atmosphere. The Registry Club House at the Registry apartment complex near campus is a community center open to all students. to help support their productivity by giving them a fully equipped computer lab and individual study rooms at their fingertips. It is equipped with an on-site state-of-the-art fitness facilities to keep you healthy. The clubhouse at Registry Bowling Green provides a unique center off campus to stay engaged with your books in an enjoyable atmosphere.
            [summary] => Finals are just around the corner, so international student diplomats Joel and Gabby are here to tell you about their favorite study spots on campus. The DSU Study Lounge , has  many comfortable chairs, sofas, and tables that are great to share with friends while you study together. You can even schedule free tutoring sessions. Plus, you are near to DSU food court, and the rec room whenever you need to recharge between study sessions! It offers all the facilities you need to feel comfortable and give the best of yourself in your studying process. Click here to see the Study Lounge hours. This  building offers you many areas for studying. Not just comfortable sofas and big tables you can share with friends, but  private study rooms.If you are taking any language or honors classes, this might be your spot. If you need to change your environment while still taking full advantage of your studying time, Starbucks offers you what you are looking for. The smell of coffee and good music makes for a welcoming environment for students and coffee lovers. All this makes the studying daily activity such an enjoyable experience. You can always go for more coffee if you feel tired and enjoy it with friends. Jody Richards Hall, formerly known as Mass Media and Technology Hall, is the home of the School of Media, and is endowed with electronic classrooms, photojournalism labs, a 24-hour computer lab and a 250 seat auditorium. The third floor in MMTH is also great for study especially if you prefer a quiet atmosphere. The Registry Club House at the Registry apartment complex near campus is a community center open to all students. to help support their productivity by giving them a fully equipped computer lab and individual study rooms at their fingertips. It is equipped with an on-site state-of-the-art fitness facilities to keep you healthy. The clubhouse at Registry Bowling Green provides a unique center off campus to stay engaged with your books in an enjoyable atmosphere.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/1-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/1-350x250.png
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [title] => Student Spotlight: Peruvian Amelia Ampuero serves Bowling Green community with internship at local veterinarian clinic
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/26/student-spotlight-peruvian-amelia-ampuero-serves-bowling-green-community-with-internship-at-local-veterinarian-clinic/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/26/student-spotlight-peruvian-amelia-ampuero-serves-bowling-green-community-with-internship-at-local-veterinarian-clinic/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-26
            [date] => 2019-11-26
            [description] => You may know Amelia as one of the front desk staff for ISSS & Study Abroad & Global Learning, however, aside from serving students with a warm & friendly smile in HCIC suite 1014, she’s taking advantage of some incredible learning opportunities outside the classroom and off campus at All Creatures Animal Hospital. Video by: Jake Stevenson
            [summary] => You may know Amelia as one of the front desk staff for ISSS & Study Abroad & Global Learning, however, aside from serving students with a warm & friendly smile in HCIC suite 1014, she’s taking advantage of some incredible learning opportunities outside the classroom and off campus at All Creatures Animal Hospital. Video by: Jake Stevenson
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-1.42.16-PM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-1.42.16-PM-350x250.png
        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [title] => Ayman Alwehaibi – WKU Student Receives Internship at Tristar Greenview Hospital
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/21/ayman-alwehaibi-wku-student-receives-internship-at-tristar-greenview-hospital/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/21/ayman-alwehaibi-wku-student-receives-internship-at-tristar-greenview-hospital/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-21
            [date] => 2019-11-21
            [description] => Ayman Alwehaibi from Buraydah, Saudi Arabia, came to Western Kentucky University as a transfer student in 2017. Alwehaibi says he wishes he would have known about the school sooner. It was not until an acquaintance who was also a student at Western Kentucky University introduced Ayman to the school that he applied and was accepted that he transferred to WKU to pursue a degree in health care administration. “I’m glad I transferred here because everybody is friendly, helpful, and everybody wants you to succeed,” said Ayman. Ayman says he especially found this to be true when Melanie Eaton, a faculty member of the public health department at WKU, helped him get an internship in his desired field of health care administration.  “If Eaton wasn’t there, giving me that hand to help me, I wouldn’t have gotten the [internship].” Ayman interned at TriStar Greenview from January to August of this year. During his internship, he helped with several areas of hospital administration, especially in administration, an area he wanted to gain direct experience with. Ayman aided in buying and selling medical equipment for the hospital, gathering and dispersing information on patient and employee satisfaction, as well as transferring calls to desired areas of the hospital.  Ayman says that if he could give advice to his fellow international students it would be this:  “Don’t waste your time, come here. You’re going to find yourself. Everybody feels that we are one community which is great. That’s what I love [about] WKU.”
            [summary] => Ayman Alwehaibi from Buraydah, Saudi Arabia, came to Western Kentucky University as a transfer student in 2017. Alwehaibi says he wishes he would have known about the school sooner. It was not until an acquaintance who was also a student at Western Kentucky University introduced Ayman to the school that he applied and was accepted that he transferred to WKU to pursue a degree in health care administration. “I’m glad I transferred here because everybody is friendly, helpful, and everybody wants you to succeed,” said Ayman. Ayman says he especially found this to be true when Melanie Eaton, a faculty member of the public health department at WKU, helped him get an internship in his desired field of health care administration.  “If Eaton wasn’t there, giving me that hand to help me, I wouldn’t have gotten the [internship].” Ayman interned at TriStar Greenview from January to August of this year. During his internship, he helped with several areas of hospital administration, especially in administration, an area he wanted to gain direct experience with. Ayman aided in buying and selling medical equipment for the hospital, gathering and dispersing information on patient and employee satisfaction, as well as transferring calls to desired areas of the hospital.  Ayman says that if he could give advice to his fellow international students it would be this:  “Don’t waste your time, come here. You’re going to find yourself. Everybody feels that we are one community which is great. That’s what I love [about] WKU.”
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/B3_6914-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/B3_6914-350x250.jpg
        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [title] => The White City: Experiences at the Corso de la Amistad
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/06/the-white-city-experiences-at-the-arequipa-festival/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/06/the-white-city-experiences-at-the-arequipa-festival/#comments
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-06
            [date] => 2019-11-06
            [description] => Our International Student Diplomat Gabby Vargas took at little bit of WKU home with her this summer to the festival called the “Corso de la Amistad” in Arequipa, Peru. Read more to hear from Gabby about her experience. My name is Gabriela, and I am a current student at Western Kentucky University and an International Student Diplomat. I was born in Arequipa which is called “The White City” of Peru. This is because of its architectural monuments built with a white volcanic rock called sillar. Arequipa people are proud of having been born in the skirts of volcanoes where the sillar came from. They honor this with a big celebration.  On August 15 of each year, Arequipeños  and tourists from all around the world arrive to Arequipa to celebrate its anniversary.  The “Corso de la Amistad” is the central activity of Arequipa’s anniversary. It is a festivity full of color and joy, where the various institutions and people pay homage to the city with the presentation of traditional dances, like “Montonero Arequipeño”. This dance represents the joy and celebration of the villagers, the “montoneros,” after the war finished and they can finally return home. I had the honor of moving WKU’s red flag next to Arequipa’s and Peru’s flag. And, as the “Montoneros”, I am excited and honored to represent my country far away from home.  
            [summary] => Our International Student Diplomat Gabby Vargas took at little bit of WKU home with her this summer to the festival called the “Corso de la Amistad” in Arequipa, Peru. Read more to hear from Gabby about her experience. My name is Gabriela, and I am a current student at Western Kentucky University and an International Student Diplomat. I was born in Arequipa which is called “The White City” of Peru. This is because of its architectural monuments built with a white volcanic rock called sillar. Arequipa people are proud of having been born in the skirts of volcanoes where the sillar came from. They honor this with a big celebration.  On August 15 of each year, Arequipeños  and tourists from all around the world arrive to Arequipa to celebrate its anniversary.  The “Corso de la Amistad” is the central activity of Arequipa’s anniversary. It is a festivity full of color and joy, where the various institutions and people pay homage to the city with the presentation of traditional dances, like “Montonero Arequipeño”. This dance represents the joy and celebration of the villagers, the “montoneros,” after the war finished and they can finally return home. I had the honor of moving WKU’s red flag next to Arequipa’s and Peru’s flag. And, as the “Montoneros”, I am excited and honored to represent my country far away from home.  
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/gabby_arequipa_2-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/gabby_arequipa_2-350x250.jpg
        )

    [7] => Array
        (
            [title] => Ali Abdulraheem: WKU grad succeeds as an Industrial Hygienist in the Health, Safety, and Environment Group at Kuwait Oil Company
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/04/ali-abdulraheem/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/04/ali-abdulraheem/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-04
            [date] => 2019-11-04
            [description] => We love it when international alumni stay in touch and share how they’re using their WKU degree. We were fortunate enough to recently catch up with Ali Abdulraheem, a Chemistry graduate from Kuwait. He now resides in Kuwait and works for Kuwait Oil Company. Last Spring when some of the team members from WKU’s Global Learning & International Affairs spent some time in Kuwait, he was kind enough to give them a full tour of Kuwait City and host them in his home for a meal. Not only does Ali generously give up his time to us, but also to students interested in studying at WKU by offering to connect with incoming students before they travel to campus for the first time. Ali graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry and a minor in Astronomy in 2015. Then he went on to complete his Masters of Science in Chemistry in 2017. We spoke to Ali about his experience at WKU and how that led him to the job he has now. Here’s what he had to say: “Although a lot of people can be qualified, the beautiful environment and people at WKU has shaped the way I am today.” Ali, like many of our international students, had the unique experience of being immersed in American culture while also getting to know people from all over the world. “The experience of the American culture and also international students can be rewarding in terms of opening up minds and expanding your horizons. Such experiences will definitely help you succeed in your career and life in general,” said Ali. Now Ali is working as an Industrial Hygienist in the Health, Safety, and Environment Group at Kuwait Oil Company. “My job is mostly related to controlling anything that can affect employees’ health from ergonomics to chemicals or radiation. It’s a very large field and we try to ensure that certain measures and standards are implemented and practiced in the company for the health and safety of all workers,” said Ali. In this photo, Ali says he was doing a survey to find out how hazardous certain jobs are to employees’ health. “In this case we were evaluating the hazards of aircrafts, which are used in medical emergencies, to see how the noise and ergonomics affected the pilots and the paramedics. Once we have all of the data, we can categorize the job as hazardous or not hazardous.” Special thanks to Ali for sharing his success story with us! If you are a international WKU alumni and are interested in being featured on the WKU, reach out to us at wkuiempr@gmail.com.
            [summary] => We love it when international alumni stay in touch and share how they’re using their WKU degree. We were fortunate enough to recently catch up with Ali Abdulraheem, a Chemistry graduate from Kuwait. He now resides in Kuwait and works for Kuwait Oil Company. Last Spring when some of the team members from WKU’s Global Learning & International Affairs spent some time in Kuwait, he was kind enough to give them a full tour of Kuwait City and host them in his home for a meal. Not only does Ali generously give up his time to us, but also to students interested in studying at WKU by offering to connect with incoming students before they travel to campus for the first time. Ali graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry and a minor in Astronomy in 2015. Then he went on to complete his Masters of Science in Chemistry in 2017. We spoke to Ali about his experience at WKU and how that led him to the job he has now. Here’s what he had to say: “Although a lot of people can be qualified, the beautiful environment and people at WKU has shaped the way I am today.” Ali, like many of our international students, had the unique experience of being immersed in American culture while also getting to know people from all over the world. “The experience of the American culture and also international students can be rewarding in terms of opening up minds and expanding your horizons. Such experiences will definitely help you succeed in your career and life in general,” said Ali. Now Ali is working as an Industrial Hygienist in the Health, Safety, and Environment Group at Kuwait Oil Company. “My job is mostly related to controlling anything that can affect employees’ health from ergonomics to chemicals or radiation. It’s a very large field and we try to ensure that certain measures and standards are implemented and practiced in the company for the health and safety of all workers,” said Ali. In this photo, Ali says he was doing a survey to find out how hazardous certain jobs are to employees’ health. “In this case we were evaluating the hazards of aircrafts, which are used in medical emergencies, to see how the noise and ergonomics affected the pilots and the paramedics. Once we have all of the data, we can categorize the job as hazardous or not hazardous.” Special thanks to Ali for sharing his success story with us! If you are a international WKU alumni and are interested in being featured on the WKU, reach out to us at wkuiempr@gmail.com.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/10/IMG_0709-75x75.jpg
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/10/IMG_0709-350x250.jpg
        )

    [8] => Array
        (
            [title] => Meet Muhammad, “Salal” Kahn, a WKU grad from Pakistan
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/01/meet-muhammad-salal-kahn-a-wku-grad-from-pakistan/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/11/01/meet-muhammad-salal-kahn-a-wku-grad-from-pakistan/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-11-01
            [date] => 2019-11-01
            [description] => We have so much pride for this #wkugrad. Muhammad Salal Khan graduated with a mechanical engineering degree last spring and now works as an engineer at a local company. Hear first-hand his experience studying in the U.S. and his advice for new international students.
            [summary] => We have so much pride for this #wkugrad. Muhammad Salal Khan graduated with a mechanical engineering degree last spring and now works as an engineer at a local company. Hear first-hand his experience studying in the U.S. and his advice for new international students.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-1.54.50-PM-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/11/Screen-Shot-2020-01-16-at-1.54.50-PM-350x250.png
        )

    [9] => Array
        (
            [title] => Finding Your Groove: Balancing Life With School
            [link] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/10/25/finding-your-groove-balancing-life-with-school/
            [comments] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/2019/10/25/finding-your-groove-balancing-life-with-school/#respond
            [pubDate] => 2019-10-25
            [date] => 2019-10-25
            [description] => Leading a balanced life can actually make you more productive at school. Taking time for yourself can benefit you and your grades in the long run. Here are some tips from students Alessia, Niyati, and Grace on how to find your groove. Before you start stressing, get organized. Organizing your room and desk can go a long way. According to an article by the Journal of Neuroscience having a cluttered environment can interfere with your ability to focus. Clean up and then start on your homework.  When planning out your week, don’t forget to make self-care a priority. Eating right, sleeping well, and exercising regularly leads to balanced, healthy life. Plus, not having enough sleep can make you less productive. According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute “[People who are sleep deficient] take longer to finish tasks, have a slower reaction time, and make more mistakes.”  Give yourself fun things to look forward to between study sessions. Once you cross something off your list, do something that you love for 30 minutes and make sure you set a timer so you don’t get off track. Eat a snack, watch Netflix, chat with friends or take a walk.   When you’re ready to sit down and do your homework, find a quiet spot. Turn off your phone and put it away. Better yet, consider leaving your phone at home when you go study. According to a study done by the University of Chicago, even the mere presence of your phone can be distracting. By following these simple steps, you’ll be able to have more time to yourself while increasing productivity. That way, at the end of the week, you can kick back and relax with friends.
            [summary] => Leading a balanced life can actually make you more productive at school. Taking time for yourself can benefit you and your grades in the long run. Here are some tips from students Alessia, Niyati, and Grace on how to find your groove. Before you start stressing, get organized. Organizing your room and desk can go a long way. According to an article by the Journal of Neuroscience having a cluttered environment can interfere with your ability to focus. Clean up and then start on your homework.  When planning out your week, don’t forget to make self-care a priority. Eating right, sleeping well, and exercising regularly leads to balanced, healthy life. Plus, not having enough sleep can make you less productive. According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute “[People who are sleep deficient] take longer to finish tasks, have a slower reaction time, and make more mistakes.”  Give yourself fun things to look forward to between study sessions. Once you cross something off your list, do something that you love for 30 minutes and make sure you set a timer so you don’t get off track. Eat a snack, watch Netflix, chat with friends or take a walk.   When you’re ready to sit down and do your homework, find a quiet spot. Turn off your phone and put it away. Better yet, consider leaving your phone at home when you go study. According to a study done by the University of Chicago, even the mere presence of your phone can be distracting. By following these simple steps, you’ll be able to have more time to yourself while increasing productivity. That way, at the end of the week, you can kick back and relax with friends.
            [wp_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/10/1-75x75.png
            [wp_big_image] => https://international.blog.wku.edu/files/2019/10/1-350x250.png
        )

)
  

 


 

@wkuinternational

APPLY NOW

 

 CONNECT WITH US:

 


Some of the links on this page may require additional software to view.

 Last Modified 8/1/19