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Diversity & Community Studies - Current Semester Offerings


Summer 2018

DCS Core Courses:

GWS 200: Introduction to Gender & Women’s Studies, with D. Cuomo (Web)

Drawing on historical perspectives and cultural analysis, this course examines such topics as women and work, violence against women, family, and the social construction of gender, sexuality, race, and class.

Approved Electives:

     1. Formation of Identity and Narratives of Oppression (minimum of 6 hours):

PSY 355: Issues in Cross-Cultural Psychology, with K. Clayton (Web)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 100/PSYS 100 or equivalent and sophomore standing. Examines the impact of culture on major principles, theories, and applications of psychology, including social behavior, gender, communication, development and abnormal psychology. Involves interacting with people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

     2. Advocacy and Social Change (minimum of 6 hours):

AFAM 343: Communities of Struggle, with A. Rosa (Web)

Prerequisite(s): AFAM 190 or permission of instructor; 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. Examines the relationship between distinct communities of struggle in Africa and the African Diaspora and the impact of African American social movements on a range of liberation struggles within this context.

     3. Systems, Local to Global (minimum of 6 hours):

GEOG 110: World Regional Geography, with K. Cary (On-Demand) and L. North (Web)

A general survey of the political, social, and ecological systems of the world. The course is concerned with the complexity and diversity of world peoples and cultures.

SOCL 240: Global Social Problems, with D. Lovell (On-Demand) and J. Musalia (Web)

Prerequisite(s):21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. Examines causes of and responses to critical social problems in different world regions, with a focus on the   dimensions and impacts of globalizations. Diverse social theories are applied to interpret problems such as environmental degradation, AIDS, family violence, racism, migration, international poverty, and crime.

SOCL 360: The Community in Rural and Urban Settings, with D. Lovell (On-Demand)

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of sociology. Study of the structure and function of community life and the process of balancing community needs and resources.

 

Fall 2018

DCS Core Courses:

CSJ 200: Introduction to Social Justice, with D. Cuomo

An introductory study of theories, concepts and strategies of social justice, including individual action, policy, advocacy, and collective action.

DCS 300: Public Problem-Solving, with M. Kerby

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations & Explorations Courses, or junior status. Investigation of historical perspectives and theoretical dimensions of public problem solving with attention to the development of collective power, capacities, and responsibilities.

AFAM 190: The African American Experience, with S. Ardrey, C. Hopson (Web) and A. Rosa

African American life and experiences in the United States viewed from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Seven core subjects are surveyed: African American history, religion, politics, creative productions (music, dance, theatre), economics, social organizations and psychology.

GWS 200: Introduction to Gender & Women’s Studies, with K. Branham, B. Button and W. Wood (Web)

Drawing on historical perspectives and cultural analysis, this course examines such topics as women and work, violence against women, family, and the social construction of gender, sexuality, race, and class.

Approved Electives:

  1. Formation of Identity and Narratives of Oppression (minimum of 6 hours):

COMM 463: Intercultural Communication, with J. Kong

Prerequisite(s): Any Colonnade K-SC or K-LG course, all with a grade of "C" or better, or instructor permission. Advances understanding and application of intercultural communication theory and research for examining, analyzing, and evaluating challenges of engaging cultural difference in today's interconnected world.

ENG 393: African American Literature, with C. Lewis

Prerequisite(s): Colonnade Category F-AH. Study of literature by African American writers

FACS 395: Child and Family Stress, with D. Haynes-Lawrence (On-Demand)

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor. Acquaint students with major concepts from the research and conceptual literature on family stress and resilience. Examines stress as experienced and perceived by children and their families. Factors that influence children's coping with stress are emphasized.

PSY 355: Issues in Cross-Cultural Psychology, with H. Lewis (Owensboro) and A. Paquin

Prerequisite(s): PSY 100/PSYS 100 or equivalent and sophomore standing .Examines the impact of culture on major principles, theories, and applications of psychology, including social behavior, gender, communication, development and abnormal psychology. Involves interacting with people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

SOCL 210: Interaction Self & Society, with D. Smith

Study of the individual in social context. Emphasis is on group, social, and cultural factors and their consequences for self-development, role perception, role performance and value orientation.

  1. Advocacy and Social Change (minimum of 6 hours):

AFAM 343: Communities of Struggle, with A. Rosa (Web)

Prerequisite(s): AFAM 190 or permission of instructor; 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. Examines the relationship between distinct communities of struggle in Africa and the African Diaspora and the impact of African American social movements on a range of liberation struggles within this context.

HIST 380: Human Rights in History, with P. Minter

Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or HIST 102; 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. This course examines the historical origins of human rights, key disputes surrounding the content and legitimacy of human rights, and the enforcement of international humanitarian law in theory and practice.

PS 374: Women and Politics, with V. Gordon

An examination of the political, economic and social status of American women from an historical and contemporary perspective; explores issues of concern to women in a political context.

  1. Systems, Local to Global (minimum of 6 hours):

FLK 330: Cultural Connections and Diversity, with T. Evans

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. Service learning course that examines the diversity of American culture and engages students in activities to develop skills in working with a variety of cultural groups

GEOG 110: World Regional Geography, with C. Alego, K. Cary and E. Greunke

A general survey of the political, social, and ecological systems of the world. The course is concerned with the complexity and diversity of world peoples and cultures.

GEOG 225: Visualizing Geography, with D. Keeling

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status. Visualizing Geography uses photographs, maps, and illustrations to explain the diversity of human societies, political systems, resources, and population movement across space and time, from local communities to our increasingly interconnected world.

HIST 200: Latin America Past and Present, with M. Eagle

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. A broad interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin America, emphasizing its regions, peoples, and cultures. Equivalent(s): GEOG 200, PS 200 and SPAN 200.

SOCL 240: Global Social Problems, with D. Lovell (Web and On-Demand)

Prerequisite(s):21 hours of Foundations and Explorations courses, or junior status. Examines causes of and responses to critical social problems in different world regions, with a focus on the   dimensions and impacts of globalizations. Diverse social theories are applied to interpret problems such as environmental degradation, AIDS, family violence, racism, migration, international poverty, and crime.

SOCL 360: The Community in Rural and Urban Settings, with D. Lovell (On-Demand)

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of sociology. Study of the structure and function of community life and the process of balancing community needs and resources.

SWRK 330: Human Behavior in Social Environments, with L. Hazlett and L. Owens (Glasgow)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 101 and SWRK 205. Prerequisite(s): for majors: Admission to the program. The social, natural, and behavioral sciences are used to examine human behavior across the life span, especially as influenced by ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and ability.

 

Schedule of Classes

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 Last Modified 3/21/18