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Dr. Peake Research

Dr. Peake Research

 

Does one bad apple spoil the bunch? An exploration of broad consumption changes in response to food recalls.

Abstract: While it is widely known that food recalls can have large, negative financial and reputational impacts, we know relatively little related to what factors increase consumers’ propensity towards broad consumption changes during food recalls. Consequently, we designed a survey instrument to better understand consumer reaction to food recalls, and in particular, uncover the driving influences behind these broad consumption changes. Results were analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. We find that recall concern, propensity to reduce consumption beyond the recall parameters in the situation of both specific branded and unbranded products, and media reliance hold strong, direct effects on broad consumption changes. Further, recall awareness exhibited a minimal role as a moderating influence, but held a strong, direct relationship with the broad consumption changes dependent measure. In addition, using chi-square tests of differences, we find two distinct points of divergence between Millennials and Non-Millennials. First, Millennials have much lower recall awareness. Secondly, Millennials are more likely to react in ways unwarranted by the recall than older generations for the peanut butter recall scenario. These findings are extremely important as policymakers, commodity processors, food manufacturers, and food retailers develop strategies for minimizing the negative impacts from food recalls.

 

Peake, W.O., Detre, J.D., & Carlson, C.C. (In Press). Does one bad apple spoil the bunch? An exploration of broad consumption changes in response to food recalls. Food Policy, 49(1): 13-22

 

Ties that bind? A mediation analysis exploring contract use in family versus nonfamily firms.

Abstract: Based on the assumptions of agency theory, family business researchers have often argued that family firms are less likely to use formal methods of monitoring and control than nonfamily firms. We explore the relationship between family firm status and presence of a written agreement among the owners, a formal measure of control. We hypothesize economic goals and perceived level of risk taking and management efficacy will mediate the relationship between family firm status and presence of a written agreement. Results indicate that the primary goal of the firm serves as a partial mediator of this relationship.

 

Peake, W.O., & Watson, W.E. (In Press). Ties that bind? A mediation analysis exploring contract use in family versus nonfamily firms. Journal of Small Business Management.

 

The impact of management experience on firm performance: A meta-analysis.

Abstract: Both academics and practitioners generally agree that management experience serves as an important factor in determining entrepreneurial venture success; however, prior literature reviews have found no consistent empirical link between management experience and entrepreneurial firm performance. Using meta-analysis, this research explores factors that may impact the estimated effects obtained for the management experience-entrepreneurial firm performance relationship reported across the current set of primary studies. The way in which researchers specified management experience was found to have a large, significant impact on the estimated effect obtained, which indicates researchers should work to develop a more comprehensive management experience measure for future research.

 

Peake, W.O. (2014). The impact of management experience on firm performance: A meta-analysis. American Journal of Entrepreneurship, 7(1): 40-77.

Emotional Intelligence and Venture Performance. Journal of Small Business Management.

Ingram, A., Peake, W., Stewart, W., and Watson, W. Emotional Intelligence and Venture Performance. Journal of Small Business Management.

 

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 Last Modified 12/1/15