Western Kentucky University

Department of Psychology

Specialist in Education: School Psychology

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On internship with supervisor.
A School Psychology student works with a child.
Internship meeting.
Students and Dr. Myers present at the National Association of School Psychologists
School graduate students on internship meet with school personnel.
School Psychology graduate students "bond" on the steps.
The School Psychology Graduate Students
School Psychology Awareness Week Bake Sale 2013
School Psychology Awareness Week Bake Sale 2013
Dr. Elizabeth Jones and school psychology student Sean Reeder present a poster at the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)
School Psychology faculty and student "network" with famous names at the NASP conference in Washington.
School psychology student Sean Reeder explains his research to an attendee at NASP.
School psychology students at the NASP conference
Clinical and school faculty meet with community groups to explore additional graduate options.
Lauren Martin is a graduate of our School Psychology Ed.S. program and is currently employed as a school psychologist for the Warren County Schools. Lauren defended her dissertation March 27, 2014.

Ed.S. Faculty

"You get a lot of individual attention and get to know the faculty on a one-to-one level." -- program graduate

 

Elizabeth L. Jones (Ph.D., University of Georgia, Associate Professor). Her interests include psychoeducational and personality assessment, multicultural issues, intervention strategies and services for children birth to five years of age. Dr. Jones has had nine years experience as a practicing school psychologist. She has worked in both rural and metropolitan public school systems within Georgia and South Carolina. She has also worked in a residential treatment center for seriously emotionally disturbed children. She holds certification as a school psychologist by the Kentucky Department of Education, a Kentucky license for the practice of psychology and is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP). Dr. Jones is a member of the National Association of School Psychologists, American Psychological Association and Division 16 of APA. She has been at Western Since 1989.

Carl. L Myers (Ph.D., Iowa State University, Associate Professor, Program Director). His interests include early childhood services, behavioral consultation with parents, early interventions with children with autism or ADHD, and functional behavioral assessment procedures. Dr. Myers has worked as a school psychologist in Iowa for nine years, primarily with children from birth to 6 years of age, but additional assignments included an elementary school and an adolescent shelter care facility. He has consulted with Head Start Programs, daycare centers, and early childhood special education programs. He completed his predoctoral internship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland where he specialized in the inpatient and outpatient treatment of children with behavioral problems related to health issues (e.g., traumatic brain injury, lead poisoning, compliance with therapies). He is a member of the National Association of School Psychologists and the Kentucky Association for Psychology in the Schools (KAPS). He served as President of KAPS during the 2001-2002 school year. He is a licensed psychologist in Kentucky. He is certified as a school psychologist by the Department of Education in Kentucky and is also a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP). He has been at WKU since 1995.

William F. Pfohl (Psy.D., Rutgers University, Professor). His interests include: cognitive behavior therapy, and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy. He is also interested in researching the concept of emotional intelligence in school age populations. Dr. Pfohl has had four and one half years of experience as a practicing school psychologist within rural and urban public school systems of New York and New Jersey. In New York, he worked in rural school districts serving regular and special education students from K-12. In New Jersey, he worked with urban, minority juvenile delinquents. He also provided regular school psychology services to a rural school system. In addition, he has worked in New York as an outpatient staff psychologist in a community mental health clinic for three years. He has had experiences in rehabilitation settings with severe disabilities from birth through adulthood. He has worked for over 35 years as a practicing psychologist. He is a licensed psychologist in Kentucky and he holds Kentucky certification as a school psychologist and is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP). Dr. Pfohl has held elected office at both the state (Kentucky & New York) and national (NASP) levels in school psychology, including the Presidency of NASP during the 1996-97 year and again in 2005-2006. Recently, he was the president of the International School Psychologists Association. He has been at Western since 1979.

Ronda Talley (Ph.D. Indiana University and MPH from Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Professor). Dr. Talley is a frequent writer and speaker on caregiving issues and on public policy and practice issues in health, education, and human services reform. She specializes in organizational planning and development, and in program evaluation. Currently, Dr. Talley is Editor-in-Chief of the Springer Caregiving book series on diverse caregiving issues and has edited nine series books since 2011. Dr. Talley received the Outstanding Alumni Award from Indiana University and the Jack Bardon Distinguished Service Award from the Division of School Psychology of the American Psychological Association. She serves on the national board of the American Association of Caregiving Youth, the Indiana University School of Education Board of Visitors, and is a past member of the Western Kentucky University National Alumni Advisory Board. Dr. Talley's professional experience includes providing national leadership on caregiving issues and organizational development as Executive Director of the Rosalynn Carter Institute for Caregiving and the National Quality Caregiving Coalition; working with federal government groups to promote caregiving issues as Associate Director of Legislation, Policy, and Planning/Health Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in Atlanta, GA; and promoting the science and practice of psychology in the schools as Associate Executive Director of Education and Director of Policy and Advocacy in the Schools at the American Psychological Association in Washington, DC. Dr. Talley worked as a teacher of students with special needs, school administrator, and director of school psychological services for almost 20 years in the Jefferson County (KY) Public Schools. She holds private practice licensure in psychology with health provider certification in Kentucky and has a private psychological practice in Bowling Green, KY, and Louisville, KY.

 Last Modified 4/14/14