Western Kentucky University

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Dr. Anthony Harkins

Dr. Anthony Harkins

Director of Popular Culture Studies/ Assoc. Prof. of History

Office:  218 Cherry Hall
Phone:  745-3149
Email:  anthony.harkins@wku.edu

Courses

POP 201: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies

HIS 447: History of American Popular Culture since the Civil War

HIS 320: American Studies

Research

Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).

Editor, “Media Section,” Encyclopedia of Appalachia (Knoxville: University of Tennessee
Press, 2006).

“Hillbillies, Rednecks, Crackers, and White Trash,” The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture,  v. 21: Social Class (University of North Carolina Press, forthcoming).

“From ‘Sweet Mamas’ to ‘Bodacious’ Hillbillies: Billy DeBeck’s Impact on American Culture,” Studies in American Humor (New series 3, No. 14, 2006), 55-72.

  
“The Hillbilly in the American Imagination,” Historically Speaking: The Bulletin of the Historical
Society (Jan./Feb., 2005): 4-7.

“Commies, H-Bombs and the National Security State: The Cold War in the Comics” in Gail W.
Pieper and Kenneth D. Nordin, eds., Understanding the Funnies: Critical Interpretations of
Comic Strips (Lisle, IL: Procopian Press, 1997): 12-36.

 

My current research extends my exploration of postwar urban and rural images and identities and my focus on popular culture as an important site of struggle over social power. This new project explores the origins, development and potential consequences of envisioning the great center of the nation as “the middle of nowhere” from the perspectives of both coastal commentators and self-defined “Flyover People.” In particular, I am investigating the impact of central transportation and communication developments (especially transcontinental passenger air travel, the interstate highway system, and the programming and conceptions of television executives) on the changing ways Americans envisioned the cultural and geographic boundaries and intersections of the nation. 

 Last Modified 7/23/13